New Kitten Introduction

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I caught her venturing into his room one time but she scurried away when she saw me coming.
Can you do more of the above...Where you place Audrey into Elliot's room, and leave her in there for a bit of time...not long...say 20-30 minutes.
By doing these type of 'Room Swaps'...and more "Scent Swaps"....you are allowing both Audrey and Elliot to smell and leave their own Scents in each other's rooms.
Exchanging Scents and Mingling Scents will lessen the 'unknown factor' ...for both cats...and lessen their fears.
...I opened the door for her and just held him on my lap, and she came a few steps into the room and watched him for a couple of minutes. No hisses or growls. They were about 7ft apart. He was watching her too. The she turned around and wandered away. I gave her a few treats afterwards. That was a good moment I think.
If you can get more interactions,...like the one above...then that is fantastic.
Thinking about how to let them encounter one another in a more controlled way (!) when the time comes, I think it would be ideal if she would scratch at the door again and I would just let her in. But there's no guarantee she will do that! - Of course, she's a cat, she will just be able to tell that I want her to do it, and saunter off...
" Of course, she's a cat, she will just be able to tell that I want her to do it, and saunter off..."
Goodness, this line above is hilarious!...Yup, she will know what you want her to do...and do the opposite...because..."she's a cat" :crackup::spew::lol:
....Is it better for me to hold him at a safe distance at first, and then set him down when she's had a couple of minutes to observe? I feel like he is just going to be super excited and rush towards her! I could try distracting him with toys (he really likes ribbons - so does she) but she is just going to seem like the best toy in the room...
It's really hard to say what is best to do for the first 'controlled encounter'.
I think what you are doing is excellent. Your instincts are really good.

Does Audrey still growl at you...if you have the Scent of Elliot on your hands or clothes?

I would probably just keep him on my lap, and do more of the observing...that you are already doing.

A ArtNJ ...has given some great advice...so I'd be curious to hear...how he would do the 'first controlled encounter'.
 

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A ArtNJ ...has given some great advice...so I'd be curious to hear...how he would do the 'first controlled encounter'.
I tend to look at it this way. Face to face is always a bit of a higher stress test than has gone before. So, for the most part, there will be some hissing and growling no matter how well you did. Not always, but usually, there will be a bit of anxiety left to work through. So I'm not a fan of 5 minutes at a time. I say when your clear its go time, pick a time when you have 90 minutes or so, an let them do their thing with you in the room. If there is growling and hissing, ignore it. If there is screaming, spitting or yowling, I'd either go back a step or at least be hovering and scared. But growling and hissing, just wait and see -- don't hover except for the first few minutes when you might be worried they will fight. If the introduction process has done its work, one or both will eventually wander off and settle down like there isn't something big going on. When your clear they aren't going to fight, after perhaps a couple more supervised sessions, then I'd let them be together all day as long as your not too far off that you wouldn't hear a problem. Thats basically my approach -- when its "go time," let them have the time to work out the rest, just being very cautious initially in case it turns out that they want to fight.

I don't recall the ages here, but if the newcomer is a kitten that still looks like a kitten, then its wildly unlikely there would be fighting. Adult cats don't attack kittens with intent to injure. They might do a "get away" swat, or somewhat rarely a get away charge, but thats about the extent of it. You might or might not decide to back up and lengthen your process if there is a lot of charge swatting -- its not the same as a fight, but it still warrants some heightened caution.
 
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Moggielady

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Hi M Moggielady ...I just wanted to say that you have two adorable 'fluff balls' in those cats of yours.:blush:
and such an amazing set-up for kitten-to-cat introductions.
That sliding glass door, and the photo of Elliot near the glass while Audrey looks down from above is just great.

How are they doing today?
And though I read above how you named beautiful fluffy Audrey after Audrey Hepburn, ...where did Elliot's name come from?
Thank you so much cat nap! Yes we are feeling super lucky to have the glass door.

The name Elliot is sort of a joke. There was a screenwriter in the very early years of Hollywood called Elliot J. Clawson and I just thought that was such a funny name for a cat. That's his full name really but we don't scold, 'Elliot J. Clawson, you get off the curtains!' when he is being naughty.

We had some good moments today.
1) Audrey came right up to the glass to inspect Elliot a couple of times. Still growling and hissing but she chose to come closer.
2) They ate their evening meals either side of the glass for the first time! (see pic attached)
3) Audrey went into Elliot's basecamp of her own volition again and didn't immediately scurry out.
4) Audrey came into the glass room and hung out for a few minutes when Elliot wasn't there. She had a good sniff of his toys and even ate a little bit of his food, the cheeky lady.
5) I sat with him in my lap about 4ft away from her a couple of times (no glass between). She growled at him but she didn't hiss or run away. And she would also blink and look aside after a few moments. Before resuming growling! He was very good and just sat in my lap and purred.

Can you do more of the above...Where you place Audrey into Elliot's room, and leave her in there for a bit of time...not long...say 20-30 minutes.
By doing these type of 'Room Swaps'...and more "Scent Swaps"....you are allowing both Audrey and Elliot to smell and leave their own Scents in each other's rooms.
Exchanging Scents and Mingling Scents will lessen the 'unknown factor' ...for both cats...and lessen their fears.
I have been a bit hesitant about this because I feel like Audrey will HATE being shut in a room she doesn't use much, especially when it smells of another cat. She generally doesn't like being enclosed unless she is fast asleep in which case we can shut the door no problem. Maybe if I sit in there with her it won't be so bad? I just don't want to create negative association with his smell - which is why I have been leaving her to explore it when she's ready.

Does Audrey still growl at you...if you have the Scent of Elliot on your hands or clothes?
Generally no. She is happy to be petted and will occasionally jump up in my lap when I smell of him. The only time she growls at me is if I give her a little stroke when she is sleeping. She always used to miaow in a grumpy way if I stroked her when she was asleep, but now it mutates into a growl at the end - I'm not even sure this is anything to do with Elliot though, it almost seems like she has learned how to make a new noise and has decided to use it at other times too! I had to pick her up to brush her earlier, which she doesn't like, and she growled at me then too. Just a little growl.

Thanks so much for your interest :)
 

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Moggielady

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I tend to look at it this way. Face to face is always a bit of a higher stress test than has gone before. So, for the most part, there will be some hissing and growling no matter how well you did. Not always, but usually, there will be a bit of anxiety left to work through. So I'm not a fan of 5 minutes at a time. I say when your clear its go time, pick a time when you have 90 minutes or so, an let them do their thing with you in the room. If there is growling and hissing, ignore it. If there is screaming, spitting or yowling, I'd either go back a step or at least be hovering and scared. But growling and hissing, just wait and see -- don't hover except for the first few minutes when you might be worried they will fight. If the introduction process has done its work, one or both will eventually wander off and settle down like there isn't something big going on. When your clear they aren't going to fight, after perhaps a couple more supervised sessions, then I'd let them be together all day as long as your not too far off that you wouldn't hear a problem. Thats basically my approach -- when its "go time," let them have the time to work out the rest, just being very cautious initially in case it turns out that they want to fight.

I don't recall the ages here, but if the newcomer is a kitten that still looks like a kitten, then its wildly unlikely there would be fighting. Adult cats don't attack kittens with intent to injure. They might do a "get away" swat, or somewhat rarely a get away charge, but thats about the extent of it. You might or might not decide to back up and lengthen your process if there is a lot of charge swatting -- its not the same as a fight, but it still warrants some heightened caution.
Thank you ArtNJ, it's lovely to hear from you again and v helpful. One question: when you say "let them do their thing with you in the room", do you mean that I should bring Audrey into the room where Elliot is, and then close the door behind her, i.e. 'trap' her in the room with him? Like I said to cat nap above I have been a bit hesitant about shutting her in anywhere with his scent and have wanted her to feel free to leave and go at her own pace. But I guess that's not going to get her to overcome her uncertainties about him if she can just run away when he moves towards her...

The details about the swatting and charging and what to look out for are very helpful too! Yes he definitely still looks like a kitten, he is only about 15 weeks old and weighs just under 3lb. Audrey isn't really a fighter anyway, though I guess she could surprise us. She tends to slink off and hide if she is worried.
 

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I've wouldn't confine cats during the face-to-face as it would increase the stress on Audrey if she doesn't have access to her favorite safe spaces to retreat, if she wants to retreat. Admittedly, it would be super annoying if you figure "I've got time to supervise the initial meeting now" open the barriers, and they don't actually mingle, but in practice the kitten is likely to be way too curious for that too happen.

It sounds like its going very well. The holding on the lap thing I regard as maybe good for taking the temperature, at least when it goes well, like it did for you. I don't regard it as a way to make progress. So you sort of need to make the calculation as whether its go time, and when its go time, you let them do their thing without interference if at all possible. Audrey hissing and growling, giving a little get away swat, thats all fine.
 
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Moggielady

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Yeah Elliot will definitely be curious and try to follow after her wherever she goes I think. It's good to know I shouldn't shut the doors or confine them in any way. I will just let them have the run of the place when it's time, and follow along monitoring. My only concern here is that there isn't really anywhere Audrey could retreat to that Elliot couldn't follow her. She isn't much of a climber at all. Her hidey spot is under our bed but he can totally get under there too if he wants...
 

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Yeah Elliot will definitely be curious and try to follow after her wherever she goes I think. It's good to know I shouldn't shut the doors or confine them in any way. I will just let them have the run of the place when it's time, and follow along monitoring. My only concern here is that there isn't really anywhere Audrey could retreat to that Elliot couldn't follow her. She isn't much of a climber at all. Her hidey spot is under our bed but he can totally get under there too if he wants...
You could make her a little house type thing out of a box. One of the members was recently recommending that. But the scratching posts tops and the bed will help as well.
 

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The name Elliot is sort of a joke. There was a screenwriter in the very early years of Hollywood called Elliot J. Clawson and I just thought that was such a funny name for a cat. That's his full name really but we don't scold, 'Elliot J. Clawson, you get off the curtains!' when he is being naughty.
"'Elliot J. Clawson, you get off the curtains!' " :lol:
I think Elliot would exactly know who you are talking to,...but like every normal cat...act like he does not hear you...or recognize that name. :blush: When cats are doing something they know we don't like,...they always act like we must be talking to someone else...or it's another animal to blame. The look on their faces when they get caught in the act, is priceless.

"Clawson....get your claws off those curtains" :biggrin:
We had some good moments today.
1) Audrey came right up to the glass to inspect Elliot a couple of times. Still growling and hissing but she chose to come closer.
2) They ate their evening meals either side of the glass for the first time! (see pic attached)
3) Audrey went into Elliot's basecamp of her own volition again and didn't immediately scurry out.
4) Audrey came into the glass room and hung out for a few minutes when Elliot wasn't there. She had a good sniff of his toys and even ate a little bit of his food, the cheeky lady.
5) I sat with him in my lap about 4ft away from her a couple of times (no glass between). She growled at him but she didn't hiss or run away. And she would also blink and look aside after a few moments. Before resuming growling! He was very good and just sat in my lap and purred.
This sounds like things are really progressing well.
That Audrey is coming closer to Elliot is a very good sign of becoming more accepting of him in her territory.

Audrey going into Elliot's basecamp and not immediately running out, also shows that she is not afraid of being near his scent,...as is sniffing his toys...and also eating a bit of his food (cheeky lady indeed. :blush:)
I think this shows that Audrey is accepting Elliot, ...and probably leaving her Scent on his things and food...just to tell him whose 'boss' here.

The growling could be her way of communicating her displeasure. And also her way of communicating that she's not quite sure of this little 'intruder.
Kittens do move fast and in erratic ways, so she could also be warning him of "NOT trying" to attempt any fast movements.
Growling could also mean that she wants him to know that she is still "top cat" in her territory...and he better behave.
I would think she is warning him of not coming too close, she is aware of him, and no sudden movements.

I have been a bit hesitant about this because I feel like Audrey will HATE being shut in a room she doesn't use much, especially when it smells of another cat. She generally doesn't like being enclosed unless she is fast asleep in which case we can shut the door no problem. Maybe if I sit in there with her it won't be so bad? I just don't want to create negative association with his smell - which is why I have been leaving her to explore it when she's ready.
I totally agree with what you are saying.
Sorry, I misunderstood.
I was under the impression that she was afraid of walking around his basecamp, or rejecting of smelling anything that is his.
If she is freely walking around and already doing these things...then his Scent is already being accepted and exchanged.

And you are totally right...you don't want to create any negative association with his smell, so closing a door would probably do that in this case. Having her walk around freely and Scent and Mark with her cheeks, body, paws would be ideal.
(My cats also hate having closed doors in the house, ...unless like you said, one of us is sitting with them...but even then, I figure they like the 'open door policy'.)
Generally no. She is happy to be petted and will occasionally jump up in my lap when I smell of him. The only time she growls at me is if I give her a little stroke when she is sleeping. She always used to miaow in a grumpy way if I stroked her when she was asleep, but now it mutates into a growl at the end - I'm not even sure this is anything to do with Elliot though, it almost seems like she has learned how to make a new noise and has decided to use it at other times too! I had to pick her up to brush her earlier, which she doesn't like, and she growled at me then too. Just a little growl.
That is so interesting.
So Audrey does use her growl to communicate displeasure with other events, too,...such as getting brushed...or being interrupted when sleeping.
I wonder if she will continue with this 'new growl sound'...or eventually change and mellow.

Try 'shushing her'...or 'saying something soothing'...and see if she lessens the growls.
Perhaps the brushing pulls her fur at times...so she really does not appreciate the necessary grooming.
Or is it the 'picking her up' she does not appreciate. Hmm.

Thank you so much for the added photo. I really get a kick at seeing kittens and cats, in all type of settings.
Especially when being introduced. :)
 
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Moggielady

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Thanks cat nap. No progress to report today, or yesterday really. Audrey is keeping a low profile. I'm actually a little worried about her: she seems very slow and lethargic and oddly 'heavy', so I'm making a vet appointment for her as soon as possible. It's just stress adjustment, but just in case: I'd hate for Elliot's arrival to mask anything else going on with her. Plus she needs her booster. I won't try and press her anymore until the vet gives her the all clear. It's so hard seeing her upset.
 

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Ah, poor Audrey. Very good of you to make that Vet appointment.
Ruling out anything medical would always be the first thing to do.

Like you said, Audrey could have some medical issue going on which cats will often hide and mask, until they feel quite ill, and stop eating.

Besides the lethargy and acting slow, have you noticed any differences in her food intake, drinking amount or litter box habits?
Does she try to steal more food from Elliot's food dish, versus eating her own food?

Being 8 years old, it's probably best to get a full senior blood panel done, and look at SDMA kidney test, heart, teeth, urinary analysis, and whatever else the Vet thinks is appropriate.
Ask the Vet if they think that a B12 shot would help Audrey, or if checking her levels would help?

As for stress, I know it affects them,...but I think that cats are very strong and resilient.
Perhaps the cat-intros are moving a tad fast for her...so it is good that you are stepping back, and waiting for the Vet's all clear.

Give them both some cat scritches from me and my fur crew. :catrub:
Sending you loads of Health Vbes and Calm Vibes for your Audrey to feeling her best quickly again. :blackcat:

ETA: I wonder if you should ask if it is okay to hold off on her booster, ...until she is feeling better?
 
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The vet feels that there's nothing physically wrong with her. She's had her booster and is actually acting a lot brighter and more herself last night/today.

Also, we have realised she is sneaking into Elliot's basecamp and polishing off his food when he's downstairs with us...
 

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Whew...thanks for this update.
Hurray, for Audrey. :clap2:

Perhaps she was just having some off-days, like us humans sometimes do.
Also, we have realised she is sneaking into Elliot's basecamp and polishing off his food when he's downstairs with us...
Sneaky and Smart.:cool2:
Maybe that caused her to feel a bit different since kitten food has more calories and such.

I even thought that she may need some 'calming treats' like they sell in pet food stores, ...but figured that her Vet would suggest if they were needed...or if they would help. (I've never used them on my animals, so wouldn't know if any really work.)
Members here, have said that classical music, or online 'music for cats' have helped their cats feel better, but again, I've not really tried that long, so would not know.
Beaphar Calming Cat Treats, 35 g: Amazon.co.uk: Pet Supplies

If the weather where you live is changing, then that too, can affect animals, since they feel the pressure changes ahead of what we humans do.
Regardless, I'm glad she got a clean bill of health.:heartshape:
 

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Glad the vet cleared her. Was never exactly sure what you meant by "heavy," but its super common for a cat with a little stress from a newcomer to not want to do much -- because they have to be vigilant against threats! Its like they think they are on guard duty. My now past cat Rocky, had these symptoms when we adopted a kitten, even though he was relatively chill and not all that pushy for a kitten. When I would close the door to the bedroom, she seemed to relax a bit and I could pet her. She would even do that thing she liked where she would climb on my chest and get petted. However, ANY noise, any noise at all, and she would dig her claws in and spring off my chest like an olympian after an air raid alert. Even with the door closed.

A mild version of "guard duty" seems to happen even if they are doing ok and in the process of coming to fully accept the newcomer. So I suspect that you have some version of this altering her behavior. Its not forever, dont worry.
 
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Was never exactly sure what you meant by "heavy"
I meant literally heavier-seeming than usual when I picked her up, especially around her belly, but also just heavy in her movements, like there was no lightness or spring in her step. Generally a bit lumpen and low to the ground. Of course the extra calories from the sneaked kitten food could explain something of that. But she's in good shape, so phew!
 
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Whew...thanks for this update.
Hurray, for Audrey. :clap2:

Perhaps she was just having some off-days, like us humans sometimes do.

Sneaky and Smart.:cool2:
Maybe that caused her to feel a bit different since kitten food has more calories and such.

I even thought that she may need some 'calming treats' like they sell in pet food stores, ...but figured that her Vet would suggest if they were needed...or if they would help. (I've never used them on my animals, so wouldn't know if any really work.)
Members here, have said that classical music, or online 'music for cats' have helped their cats feel better, but again, I've not really tried that long, so would not know.
Beaphar Calming Cat Treats, 35 g: Amazon.co.uk: Pet Supplies

If the weather where you live is changing, then that too, can affect animals, since they feel the pressure changes ahead of what we humans do.
Regardless, I'm glad she got a clean bill of health.:heartshape:
Thank you cat nap! I've never used calming treats or music before either. Something think about...
 

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I think I would only use 'calming treats' if things were more stressful.
In this case, no. Audrey and Elliot seem fine.
I always think it's better to not use anything that will alter a cat's mind and body, unless they were really, really fearful.

With cat intros, ...it's mostly just time and patience...on the part of all cats and humans, too. :bluepaw:

ETA: (to give you a smile for the day...take a look at this thread...involving 'classical music concerto and a cat')
Meanwhile in the music scene - Featuring a 'Cat-certo' Symphony Meow Meow Meow No 9
I watched it twice, ...it made me laugh. That cat definitely appreciates classical music.)
 
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So this morning they both seemed in normal-ish spirits and they ate near the glass, and it's been *almost* three weeks, so I thought... let's see what happens? We had time to monitor them for an hour or two if the encounter would last that long.

Audrey stayed in 'her' room on the other side of the glass, and when I opened the door, Elliot immediately went scampering through. Audrey was up on the windowsill so she could look down at him. She hissed and growled like always. He would freeze and watch her when she growled at him, and then maybe back away, at which point she would stop growling and lick her lips, and when she was quiet again he would venture back over.

He got bolder and bolder with this, getting as close as he could without jumping up, until she had had enough and she ran away into another room. He followed her, of course. Then the growling/hissing, hanging back, backing off, then returning once it seemed 'safe' resumed - except that a couple of times she swatted him (not hard) when he got too close.

After a while she went behind a chair I think to try and hide from him. We had the cat carrier open on the floor and Elliot went inside and looked at her through the mesh, and she charged at the carrier and swatted it, which gave him a fright. Then she went back behind the chair. And at this point we felt bad for her (it had been about 20 minutes) and we separated them again for an hour or so.

Audrey went back to her windowsill and she stayed there again when we let Elliot approach her for the second time. This time though we tried to distract him more with a toy so maybe he wouldn't chase her so much and that seemed to help. Audrey even started watching the toy some of the time instead of *just* focusing on him. And we gave them both treats. I really didn't think Audrey would eat while he was there but she seemed to feel safe enough up on the windowsill to eat a couple.

Again we let this go on about 20 minutes and then we closed Elliot away and Audrey ran upstairs and went under the bed for about 45 minutes. That's where she goes when she is grumpy... She came out again though and went to sleep in her normal bed after that.

He is clearly going to *annoy the hell out of her* but it's good to know that he *can* be distracted from her with a wand toy and that he is obeying her hisses and growls at least when she is looking at him!

Oh, and later when I was holding him and putting out some of his food with my other hand (if I don't hold him while I put it out he will shove his head in the bowl and get it all over my hand), Audrey came running over and hardly noticed he was there because she was so eager to get some of his kitten food!
 
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Moggielady

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I think I would only use 'calming treats' if things were more stressful.
In this case, no. Audrey and Elliot seem fine.
I always think it's better to not use anything that will alter a cat's mind and body, unless they were really, really fearful.

With cat intros, ...it's mostly just time and patience...on the part of all cats and humans, too. :bluepaw:

ETA: (to give you a smile for the day...take a look at this thread...involving 'classical music concerto and a cat')
Meanwhile in the music scene - Featuring a 'Cat-certo' Symphony Meow Meow Meow No 9
I watched it twice, ...it made me laugh. That cat definitely appreciates classical music.)
Just watched it, LOL!
 

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Audrey was up on the windowsill so she could look down at him. She hissed and growled like always. He would freeze and watch her when she growled at him, and then maybe back away, at which point she would stop growling and lick her lips, and when she was quiet again he would venture back over.
That is a fantastic meeting.
I'm really glad that you noticed the 'licking the lips' behaviour.
(When I notice it in my cats, ...it sometimes means that they are preparing to do something. Anticipation...or right before they engage in rough play.)
He got bolder and bolder with this, getting as close as he could without jumping up, until she had had enough and she ran away into another room. He followed her, of course. Then the growling/hissing, hanging back, backing off, then returning once it seemed 'safe' resumed - except that a couple of times she swatted him (not hard) when he got too close.
Excellent.
Glad that Elliot is getting more confident, and Audrey is allowing him to be near her, ...but also showing him her 'boundaries'...and not to get too close.
Growling, hissing, swatting is all normal....especially if Elliot is 'learning to read her cues'.
Cat communication at it's best.
After a while she went behind a chair I think to try and hide from him. We had the cat carrier open on the floor and Elliot went inside and looked at her through the mesh, and she charged at the carrier and swatted it, which gave him a fright. Then she went back behind the chair. And at this point we felt bad for her (it had been about 20 minutes) and we separated them again for an hour or so.
Still good. Using any obstacles for protection, and to break 'open lines of sight'.
Elliot is very smart to get into that carrier and look at Audrey from there. Wow, what a smart kitten

I would have felt bad for Elliot, getting that fright,:fear:...and not Audrey...but I guess I understand that you just want Audrey to be less stressed and accepting.
Either way, it's really good that Audrey charged and swatted at the carrier, and not at Elliot himself.
She needed to release extra adrenaline, energy,...so why not take a run and charge.
Again, she's showing Elliot who the 'top cat' is. Teaching him manners and such.
Audrey went back to her windowsill and she stayed there again when we let Elliot approach her for the second time. This time though we tried to distract him more with a toy so maybe he wouldn't chase her so much and that seemed to help. Audrey even started watching the toy some of the time instead of *just* focusing on him. And we gave them both treats. I really didn't think Audrey would eat while he was there but she seemed to feel safe enough up on the windowsill to eat a couple.
Nice. Good thinking about using the toy for Distraction, and also equally doling out the treats.
Again we let this go on about 20 minutes and then we closed Elliot away and Audrey ran upstairs and went under the bed for about 45 minutes. That's where she goes when she is grumpy... She came out again though and went to sleep in her normal bed after that.
Good she came back.
I would imagine that she was a bit tired too, ...since it makes total sense what ArtNJ said about Audrey having to be on "guard duty".
Grumpy or not, she seems to bounce back to her usual self, which is good.
He is clearly going to *annoy the hell out of her* but it's good to know that he *can* be distracted from her with a wand toy and that he is obeying her hisses and growls at least when she is looking at him!
So true.
I'm hoping that he is a very fast learner.
Oh, and later when I was holding him and putting out some of his food with my other hand (if I don't hold him while I put it out he will shove his head in the bowl and get it all over my hand), Audrey came running over and hardly noticed he was there because she was so eager to get some of his kitten food!
"if I don't hold him while I put it out he will shove his head in the bowl and get it all over my hand),"
Haha...that has to be some sort of 'learning curve' for you too, then.
What a fun riot must be taking place, when you have to feed them. :blush:
Who would think that a small kitten would be so strong when it comes to eating from his food dish. :lol:

"Audrey came running over and hardly noticed he was there because she was so eager to get some of his kitten food!"
Perhaps using a small amount of his kitten food as a 'treat' for Audrey, would be okay...to associate Elliot with positive things.
And so she thinks that she is getting an equal good food, too. A tiny amount.

Though, I guess, you don't want her to 'want to eat his food all the time'.
Hmmm....This is going to be a difficult dilemma, and situation to circumvent.
Ahhh...the joys of cats and kittenhood. :biggrin:
 

lily2021

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I’m so happy I found this thread and I’m so
Happy Audrey & Elliot are making great progress :) My husband and I have also been trying to introduce our current cat who is about 4-5 years old to a 4 month old kitten. They are both females and we honestly feel like it has been getting worse. The first week or so we did not let them visually see each other, just be heard through the door. Our resident adult cat thought something was off since we started to shut the office door where the new kitten resides. I then started to drop treats near the door, began feeding them through the door, there were hisses from our resident cat but after a few days I was able to move her closer and even open the door a bit so they can see each other (before that I have been doing so much scent swapping with blankets/toys/etc and our cat just hisses/growls and swishes tail low and aggressively). It’s been about 2 weeks and we moved to feeding them In the same room but we have to hold the kitten since I get a sense that we should not trust her to roam around alone, I feel our cat would hurt the kitten (we are not able to clip her nails as she gets soooo aggressive and she bites, she is the type of cat that lets you know when she’s had enough and she huffs a lot). Our resident cat will also try to bang on the door the kitten is in so we have started to let her in while we hold the kitten and she watches, but our cat is just going in there for food and will full on aggressively hiss and today we tried to distract them by play but our cat cannot be distracted- they were about 6ft apart and our older cat tried to lunge with her teeth at the kitten. Since then they have been separated again and she remains to have access to the house while the kitten remains in her safe zone. We are becoming SO discouraged and stressed over this and feel we cannot trust our resident cat’s aggressive behavior at the end of the day. Any advise would be so appreciated. Thank you!!!
 
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