There's a DOG in my house

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squirtle

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I have to vent here...

The dog has humped my cat today
, peed and pooped on my Christmas tree skirt. To make things worse after having cleaned everything up and taking a hot bath I went to lay on the couch to watch tv and find myself laying in a soaking wet spot, smell my hand and it is dog pee, on my couch!!!! The dog is not allowed on the couch, so apparently while we were gone to dinner he decided he would make himself comfortable on the couch, and had the nerve to pee on it. I am so frustrated I feel like I could cry
I take him out 20 times a day.

It is so hard to be patient and understanding sometimes.
 

percysmom

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I have dogs and cats. You have a bad boy, he is trying to claim evrything as his, dogs pee on things as dominant behaviour. Maybe obedience class would help but use natures miracle on the pee spots and crate that dog when ever you are not able to supervise. Look online for the Nothing In Life Is Free training. It might help you get dominance over that boy. Dogs are pack animals and you must be the leader of the pack or he will continue to think he has a chance to be.
Crating is not for punishment but as a safe place to keep the dog out of mischief it works.I like the idea of the leash left on to redirect the dog from the cat but make it a positive thing. when the dog chases the cat grab the leash and say LEAVE IT turn around and walk away from the cat praising the dog for going away. eventually you will only need to say leave it and the dog will walk away. honest it does work.
 

KitEKats4Eva!

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We use the `leave it' command for our pups, and it works a charm.

Peeing is not always a sign of dominance - didn't you say that he is not neutered? That will help. And, much like with cats, it does tend to be a habit thing, as well. A dog can easily learn that pee on the floor is bad, but that does not necessarily mean he will make the connection that it is bad but that HE PUT IT THERE. They simply do not think like us, and you have to listen to and watch them to understand them. It makes all training much, much easier.

I highly recommend the book `The Dog Listener' by Jan Fennell. It's just an outstanding book and has made our lives with our pups a lot better - for us and for them. They have always been very responsive to training, and I only use positive reinforcement with them anyway, but this really helps you to understand them and understand how to become the alpha dog, without resorting to punishments and force.

It's funny how some things in the States that are commonplace are virtually unheard of here. If you talk to a vet in Australia about crate training, they just look at you as if you spoke in tongues. It's widely considered not necessary unless you are given to travelling long distances. There are plenty of ways you can toilet train your pup without using a crate. Same with declawing, just to get off the subject - apart from it being illegal here anyway, no one does it, cos, well, they just don't! But it seems very common in the US.

I think both these things have mostly arisen from the much higher proportion of apartment living and/or houses without yards in the States, as compared to here.
 
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squirtle

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We worked out our finances and will be getting a crate this evening after work.
I know it's in a seprate thread, but Brody has heart worms and shouldn't be neutered until they have been cured. He can't go to oberdience training until they are cured either.
I got up this morning feeling better about the whole thing. He didn't have any accidents in the house last night, at least not that I could find. But when I let him out this morning, on the way through the door he stopped and peed on the rug
All I could do was laugh and think about how much fun it will be to get him used to the crate.
Also, I have been working with him on the NILIF program. It has helped, he has learned to sit, but of course he will still need more work in the training area.
 

loveysmummy

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Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva!

We use the `leave it' command for our pups, and it works a charm.
I agree..."Leave it" is useful for anything from a cat to a piece of garbage on the ground to advanced training technique (you know you are a successful trainer when you can effect a great "leave it" and a "down" with a dog sitting right in front of a piece of steak
)

It's funny how some things in the States that are commonplace are virtually unheard of here. If you talk to a vet in Australia about crate training, they just look at you as if you spoke in tongues. It's widely considered not necessary unless you are given to travelling long distances. There are plenty of ways you can toilet train your pup without using a crate. Same with declawing, just to get off the subject - apart from it being illegal here anyway, no one does it, cos, well, they just don't! But it seems very common in the US.

I think both these things have mostly arisen from the much higher proportion of apartment living and/or houses without yards in the States, as compared to here.
I didn't know that crating wasn't a tool used in Australia. You learn something new every day! Here I have to state though that crate training has nothing to do with a size of a yard (its looked down upon more here to leave your dog in a yard unsupervised all day than to crate your dog safely in the house).
And its not necessarily used for housebreaking.

Here is a great link on why crate-training is nowhere near similiar to declawing and can actually make your dog feel like a safe, secure member of the family.
(ie, its not a punishment tool).
My dogs have always gone into their crates willingly with their toys or bones on their own...It was their own little "mine" space


http://www.barkbytes.com/training/crate.htm
 

loveysmummy

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Originally Posted by squirtle

We worked out our finances and will be getting a crate this evening after work.
I know it's in a seprate thread, but Brody has heart worms and shouldn't be neutered until they have been cured. He can't go to oberdience training until they are cured either.
I got up this morning feeling better about the whole thing. He didn't have any accidents in the house last night, at least not that I could find. But when I let him out this morning, on the way through the door he stopped and peed on the rug
All I could do was laugh and think about how much fun it will be to get him used to the crate.
Also, I have been working with him on the NILIF program. It has helped, he has learned to sit, but of course he will still need more work in the training area.
Yes, you are right, Tanya....Got your pm after reading about Brody's latest escapades.

Will see if I can dig up some old resources and offer you more info. later.

Cheers
Cin
 

KitEKats4Eva!

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Originally Posted by Loveysmummy

I agree..."Leave it" is useful for anything from a cat to a piece of garbage on the ground to advanced training technique (you know you are a successful trainer when you can effect a great "leave it" and a "down" with a dog sitting right in front of a piece of steak
)



I didn't know that crating wasn't a tool used in Australia. You learn something new every day! Here I have to state though that crate training has nothing to do with a size of a yard (its looked down upon more here to leave your dog in a yard unsupervised all day than to crate your dog safely in the house).
And its not necessarily used for housebreaking.

Here is a great link on why crate-training is nowhere near similiar to declawing and can actually make your dog feel like a safe, secure member of the family.
(ie, its not a punishment tool).
My dogs have always gone into their crates willingly with their toys or bones on their own...It was their own little "mine" space


http://www.barkbytes.com/training/crate.htm
I actually think crate training is a very good idea. I really wanted to do it with Ruby, but Max wouldn't let me. I tried to explain that it's not used as a punishment blah blah, but he refused. I read lots about it and definitely thought it would be a very effective way to help with many things with dogs, but I had to do it the hard way!! Lol...

Although, I have to say, I've been very fortunate to have dogs that are extremely intelligent and responsive, and learnt very quickly with the method I use, which is clicker-training.

In the course that I'm doing to become an obedience trainer, I'm learning a lot about behaviour and psychology of animals, and of course dogs in particular, and I certainly do agree that crating can actually help create a secure, happy dog. We don't leave our dogs in the yard either, and crating would have been a nice way to stop all the messes in the house we had to clean up for months!
 

hissy

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The only way that the crate training turns into punishment is after the dog goes in there, if you yell and scream at them, or god forbid hit them (not that you would Tanya) then it turns into a punishment. But we have used our crate for time outs on all our puppies without problems. They know if they do something they shouldn't like chase the cats, or jump on the table to grab food, they have to go to bed. They also go into their crate (it's actually a large cage big enough for two shephed dogs) every night without question and sleep there till morning.

Tanya, I would put Brody in his crate anytime you cannot keep an eye on him. Until he is neutered, until he is healthy and until he is obedience trained he should be crated or watched. Many people would have just opened up their back gate for this dog and let him loose after going through all of this. My hat is off to you for not losing patience, and I feel sorry for this dog for what he has more than likely been through before now. He is lucky he found you, and hopefully one day you too can say the same-
 
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squirtle

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I ended up buying a crate for Brody on Saturday. I got this one:
http://www.petsmart.com/global/produ...Text=crate&N=2

It is for a dog up to 25 pounds and Brody weighs 20. This crate has made a world of difference in our home.
Saturday afternoon started what I call "Camp Brody". I got the crate together and he jumped right in, a big plus for me because I was worried about getting him used to it. I praised him like crazy when he got inside and gave him a few treats. While he was in his crate I got to work. I had to steam clean the sofa and mop all of the wood floors in the house. I also used an enzyme spray to clean all of the areas I could find that Brody had marked on.

After I was finished I let Brody out of the crate and attached his leash to his collar. I kept him within leash distance of me for the rest of the evening. I didn't let him get away with anything. I gave him a very firm "NO" when he did soemthing he wasn't supposed to. I did give him a slight tug on the leash (he had the harness on) and a firm "NO" when he tried to go after Dori. I also made him sit or lay down before I would pet him or play with him. I rewarded him with a "Good Sit" or "Good lay down" and a treat everytime he did what he was supposed to do.

I brought him out several times that evening and highly praised him everytime he walked out into the grass on his own, and even more so when he used the bathroom. He slept in his crate for the first time Saturday night and did great. I woke up at 4am, to let him outside to use the bathroom and he did and when we came back inside he got right back into his crate which rewarded him with lots of praises and treats.

Sunday was the 2nd day of "Camp Brody". I brought him for a walk that morning around half of the block. I was very firm during the walk, he normally rolls over and plays dead to get out of walking. I carried treats with me and praised him for walking short distances. The first half was tough, but the second half he walked right next to me like any other dog.
When we got him I put him in his crate for a few hours while I did my weekly house cleaning and then I let him out for several hours while i watched football. This day was not as trying as the previous. He was practically ignoring Dori when she walked into the room, and I of course rewarded him with praises and treats.

Yesterday was basically the same but it was my first day at work since we got the crate. I let him out before leaving, then put him back in the crate. I left him with his "Kong" toy with a treat inside so he had something to occupy him. I went home at lunch time to let him outside as well. There were no problems whatsoever.

Things are really looking better as far as Brody's training and I couldn't be more happy. I have dedicated my time the past few days to working with Brody and it has really paid off. I would have never thought there would be this much improvement so quickly and I know it is going to get better. Brody seems very happy in his new home as well.

This morning Dori was waiting at the sliding glass door when I was coming in from letting Brody use the bathroom. She greeted him by sniffing and sat next to him while he sniffed at her. He sniffed for a moment then walked away and left her alone. THAT alone was very impressive to me


I have a few questions about the crate..... I am putting him in it when I begin doing something that prevents me from keeping an eye on him. Last night I put him in his crate while I took a hot bath. Is that mean? I know he has to be in it when we sleep and when we are at work but is it mean to use it at other times like that?
Is the crate a permanent thing, will he always sleep in it at night and when I am at work?

I also want to make sure I think everyone who has given me such wonderful invaluable advice on how to handle life with a dog. I can not thank you enough.


I stopped at lunch time today and bought Brody a new tag with his name and MY address and phone number on it. He's my dog now so he should have a tag. I also picked him up a treat for being so good, a braided bully stick which I read dogs love.
 

hissy

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You are on the right track, and no you are not being mean! I put Chyna in her crate many times during the day, however, I also bring her out and take her outside and play with her. You can buy pads for the cages that are fit to size so they can be comfortable. We also have those dishes that attach to the sides of the cage for water and food. I put treats in those dishes, and keep fresh water available. Chyna is not neglected, nor do I suspect that Brody is.
She goes with us when we take off somewhere, and we let her outside during the day to run around the property- she can't get off our acreage unless she goes down by the creek and wriggles under the fence. We have put a picket fence gate across our new addition, otherwise she comes in and takes my clean or dirty clothes and spreads them all over the backyard, or she eats the cat food left for the two barn cats. The gate keeps her away from this type of mischief.
 
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squirtle

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Thanks Hissy.
I feel better now. Last night when I put him in it to take my bath I felt terrible. He looks at me with those sad little eyes. He falls asleep very quickly though once he is inside, and he snores louder than I ever imagined a dog could snore. When he used to sleep in the living room I could hear him back in my room


I saw those pads you are mentioning at Petsmart. For now I have 2 blankets folded up so he is nice and comfy. After the holidays pass I am going to buy a couple of the pads to put down instead of the blankets. I thought 2 would be good so we have a spare in case one needs to be washed.

Brody gets himself into mischief just like your Chyna
He drags things all over the place inside the house.
I can't let him outside by himself though. He really hates to be alone outside. At first he hated being out there period, now he just hates it if he gets stuck out there by himself. I think he feels we are going to leave him out there and not come back. We also have an inground swimming pool, and I have read that because of the type of dog he is he will not be able to swim. I don't want to take any chances.
I do take him out to play a couple of times a day. I have to watch his energy level because of the heart worms so we don't spend a great deal of time playing. He has so much fun though that I can't imagine preventing him from having any play time for 7 months.
 

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Tanya,
It sounds as if you and Brody are doing wonderful at the training...
I read the latest sicky thread and hope he is doing much better.

And no, you are not being mean....With dogs, you need to be firm and consistent. Crating IS the best preventive. Its meant to keep your dog safe while you can't watch him. Its the best thing for him.
I disagree with Hissy on taking a dog over to his crate when he has acted up, but we all have different methods. I don't want a dog to associate you using your corrective MAD voice with his crate. And dogs simply do not understand things like 15 minute time-outs. This isn't how they process good and bad behaviour. This is what I have learnt under the tutelage of several trainers anyway..

But as a preventive, a housebreaking tool and a safe den, I think its perfect.
You keep going, girl!!


Kisses and skritches to Brody.
 

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Originally Posted by squirtle

We also have an in ground swimming pool, and I have read that because of the type of dog he is he will not be able to swim. I don't want to take any chances.
I've read that, too, but I've never actually seen a satisfactory explanation. Some dogs won't stay outside because they're afraid they're "missing something" inside. Others who were kept exclusively outdoors, and then learned the comforts of indoor living, seem afraid that they'll have to forego those comforts if they don't object to being outdoors.
As far as crate training is concerned, I've never used it, though I've confined puppies to playpens, but I have seen how my mom's dog reacts to a crate. My sister crate-trained a puppy, and once he got past the chewing stage, she was going to get rid of the crate. My mom said she'd take it, and stored it in the cellar recreation room. One of her dogs immediately started sleeping in the crate (the door has been removed), which we now refer to as "Kano's cave". He seems to feel very safe there. I suppose it replaces a "wolf's lair" for many dogs.
 

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