There's a DOG in my house

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squirtle

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This dog is something else. I had to pick him up and carry him from the sliding glass door out to the grass for him to use the bathroom
He had to go, but wouldn't walk out there.
I took the baby gate down for about an hour this evening and let him come down the hall in the office while I was studying. Dori was sitting up on my desk and Brody walked over and sat about 3 feet from her. He kept inching closer and Dori didn't really have any reaction. He then got up on his back legs and tried to get close enough to sniff Dori, she didn't like that and hissed at him. I made him lay down at that point. I was so suprised she let him so close though.
I was thinking it might be a good idea to let him spend a little supervised time back here with Dori. I thought it may help them get used to eachother.
If this was 3 days ago I would think that was trying to move things along too fast, but Dori has surpised me as to how accepting she seems to be of him.
 

KitEKats4Eva!

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I don't know if you've had this advice, but you did the right thing....

Apparently when introducing dogs and cats you have to be in control of the dog the whole time, and let the cat roam around and do what they want - even to the point of holding the dog in a sit for the duration of the interaction.

Also, it would really help if you gave Brody treats when he does what you want - although he sounds pretty well trained, lucky you!!
 

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If you can't get a crate right away, you could restrict his area by tying him. We had a dog (Logan) who we would tie on a short lead to the foot of our bed when he was young. That way he was with us at night, but learned to lay down and sleep.

We even used that for our other pup Jack. His crate was in our bedroom, but when he was being housebroken I did not want to lug it from room to room, so dh put a hook in a door frame in the kitchen and living room. That way Jack was always with someone, but also restrained so he didn't have any accidents.

I do not think a leash inside would be safe for all day, in case they got tangled. But a crate is a great way of keeping a dog well behaved while you are gone all day.
 
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squirtle

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Oh no not another forum! My fiance asked me if I was going to join a dog forum now, I told him I would never get anything done!
I will probably check it out for informational purposes though. I do need some help with this guy.

About tying him off in the house, I actually did that a bit last night when I let him in the office with me. I hooked the end of his leash around the day bed post. That was so he couldn't take off after Dori. I would like to have him be able to sleep in the room with us at night but I can't do that just yet, even with him tied off because Dori sleeps in bed with me. She doesn't relax when he is in the same room with her yet so she needs some more time to adjust. I truly do feel guilty about this.... I am trying so hard to keep this transition as easy as possible on Dori. I hate that the dog has to sleep all alone in the living room but he is safe and warm there. Once he and Dori are adjusted he will not be confined anymore. He is doing great with the housebreaking, he must have been housebroken at his prior home. As I mentioned there were no accidents while he was home alone for the day yesterday, and no problems last night either.
We made a little progress with the leash last night as well. I actually left it clipped on his collar while he was inside so he could drag it around and get used to it actually being there. I was able to walk him around the house a little bit without him fighting it. I hope this is a step in the right direction

I am working with him as often as I can. After I get past the next week and a half I will have plenty of time to spend with him and Dori. I just have 3 finals and a huge presentation/ research paper to write and turn in. Then classes are out for the semester and I have about 3 weeks off. I work full time too, but my evenings and weekends will be free. I am hoping that during this time off from school things will really settle down a bit.
 
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squirtle

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Last night Dori and Brody actually sniffed each other nose to nose for a minute or so. Then Dori just casually walked off and hopped over the baby gate to our room.

Then, later in the evening I decided to take the baby gate down and let the dog come hang out with us in the office. I had just brought him outside where he went to the bathroom. He walked into the office and stopped at Dori's basket that has all of her toys in it (there are a lot of them) and he cocked his leg out and started peeing on her toys!!!!
I was so angry. I said "Bad Dog" and picked him up and put him outside in the yard. I got so upset once he was outside because I had to throw away some of her toys. I figure he was just marking his territory since he isn't neutered. I was ready to make him an appointment for today to be neutered but my fiance said we have to wait the 21 days that animal control told us to wait in case someone claims him. I know we have to wait but I can't have him peeing on Dori's stuff!
It is so frustrating!
 

loveysmummy

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Hi

Awww. Not nice, Brody!
Here are some tips for this dominant marking doggie:
Feed, and play with Brody in the area where Dori's toys are.
(put his food bowl next to Dori's basket and toys for now). He will be less inclined to mark over her scent if he finds it a neutral feel good place


Obviously, he sounds a bit dominant. I hope you are still thinking of enrolling him in obedience training right after he is up to date on shots and neutered. It will really make life easier !


For now, what I would do is put Brody on your own NILIF (Nothing IN Life is Free) program. Here's a quick rundown and it works wonders on curbing misbehaviours in Brody's everywhere
... This is a safe, non-confrontational way to establish your leadership and requires your dog to work for everything he wants from you. Have your dog obey at least one command (such as "sit") before you pet him, give him dinner, put on his leash or throw a toy for him. Don't allow Brody to exit outside ahead of you or get up on the couch, for example, without your invitation after "sitting" or "down"ing etc. Establishing yourself as a strong leader can help stabilize the hierarchy and thus diminish your dogâ€[emoji]8482[/emoji]s need to mark his territory.

Hope this helps for now!~
 
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squirtle

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Originally Posted by Loveysmummy

Hi

Awww. Not nice, Brody!
Here are some tips for this dominant marking doggie:
Feed, and play with Brody in the area where Dori's toys are.
(put his food bowl next to Dori's basket and toys for now). He will be less inclined to mark over her scent if he finds it a neutral feel good place


Obviously, he sounds a bit dominant. I hope you are still thinking of enrolling him in obedience training right after he is up to date on shots and neutered. It will really make life easier !


For now, what I would do is put Brody on your own NILIF (Nothing IN Life is Free) program. Here's a quick rundown and it works wonders on curbing misbehaviours in Brody's everywhere
... This is a safe, non-confrontational way to establish your leadership and requires your dog to work for everything he wants from you. Have your dog obey at least one command (such as "sit") before you pet him, give him dinner, put on his leash or throw a toy for him. Don't allow Brody to exit outside ahead of you or get up on the couch, for example, without your invitation after "sitting" or "down"ing etc. Establishing yourself as a strong leader can help stabilize the hierarchy and thus diminish your dogâ€[emoji]8482[/emoji]s need to mark his territory.

Hope this helps for now!~
Oh, Brody is absolutely going to obedience school just as soon as he is neutered and up to date on shots. He gets shots Saturday and we have 2 more weeks until time for neuter.
I feel like this is necessary.

I read about the NILIF program on one of the sites you linked in a previous post
I have been making him sit before petting, and eating as well. It's doesn't really work on taking him outside or puttting the leash on him because he hates both. I have to carry him outside to use the bathroom. For example, this morning I got him to go out to pee and then he ran back to the door. He has been going "#2" in the mornings as well. So I had to pick him up from the door and carry him back to the grass so he would go, and he did. It seems strange that if he has to go, I have to drag him out there. He hasn't been going inside the house. The poor thing is terrified of the leash. If he sees me reach for it he runs and hides. I wonder if he thinks I am going to take him out and not come back.


Loveysmummy, I wanted to thank you so much for all of the help and information you have given me. I truly appreciate it. I know I sound frustrated sometimes and I am trying not to get that way, I really am. It's just an adjustment that I know we will make sucessfully. My fiance keeps picking on me because he says I am used to having a cat. He says the cat trained me so it was easy, a dog however is like a kid.


I called around to several vets offices this morning, and also to the pet stores (including Pet Smart) to see if anyone reported a dog like Brody missing. I placed an ad in Petfinder's found ads and checked the local paper as well. Still not having any luck.
 

leto86

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Also a good thing to do is to either tie a rope or a short leach to his collar. Let him wear that when he was free rage of the house.. of he goes at the cat or goes to do something bad, then grab it and snap it/tug it along with the No command.

The poor thing is terrified of the leash. If he sees me reach for it he runs and hides. I wonder if he thinks I am going to take him out and not come back.
I ahve seen alot of peole hit the dog with the leash.. this may have been done to him. I know my grandmother would do that to correct her large dogs behavior, I think its wrong.. but it worked.

and he does look French Bulldog... but maybe mixed? or possibly just bad breeding. =\\
 

ravyn

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He probably is afraid of the leash. Some people use leashes to beat their dogs...sad but true. Keeping the leash hooked to him and letting him drag it around the house from time to time without actually taking him out is good for him. Also, sometimes, just go and randomly get the leash out, carry it around with you, or lay it in your lap or on the floor. Whenever he goes near it on his own, even if he's not paying attention to the leash, tell him he's a good boy. Make a BIG fuss, like he just won the nobel prize or something.

Bulldogs of all kinds are extremely stubborn. If he was my dog, this is what I would do on the 'hating to go outside' thing.

I'd buy him a cheap harness and put it on him. Let him run around in that until he's used to it being there (treat him and act like its a massively big deal that he's 'getting' to wear this). Hook the leash to the harness and let him drag it around a bit (he may be neck shy from having the rope tied so tight around his neck...and stubborn dogs are often pulled hard around the neck by idiot owners).

Now, here's the trick to getting him outside. Open the door wide to the yard, then start playing with him (ignoring the door, make sure the cat is enclosed somewhere so there's no sneaking out, if its an indoor only cat). Get him REALLY hyper and excited and chasing you around. Then, with no warning, snatch hold of his leash and run, still excited, right out the door. If it works right, he'll be so eager and excited about chasing you around that he'll run right out the door with you before realizing what's going on. Once outside, praise him excitedly, give him a treat, and take him right back inside. Do this a dozen or so times (without expecting him to potty, just outside, praise, right back in) and he should be eager to go out the door even without the happy play. Then work on taking him out to the grass area (holding his leash to prevent him going back to the door) and waiting until he potties before letting him go back to the door. You really want to work on getting him to go out on his own. Carrying does nothing toward getting him to do it on his own. All it is teaching him is that it's only potty time when Mom carries me outside. To his mind potty=carry, and potty needs to equal 'walking outside and doing my business'.

Remember. You are in charge. Don't let him manipulate you (and he will try
). You have to be more stubborn than the dog. NILIF is a fabulous method especially if you have a dominant dog. Neutering will definately help with the marking and some of the behavior. I, too, recommend crate training but I am also very aware of how expensive crates are. You can sometimes find them fairly cheap on ebay, or at swap meets. Crates are fabulous for many aspects of training, just not potty training.
 

loveysmummy

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Originally Posted by Leto86

Also a good thing to do is to either tie a rope or a short leach to his collar. Let him wear that when he was free rage of the house.. of he goes at the cat or goes to do something bad, then grab it and snap it/tug it along with the No command.


I ahve seen alot of peole hit the dog with the leash.. this may have been done to him. I know my grandmother would do that to correct her large dogs behavior, I think its wrong.. but it worked.

and he does look French Bulldog... but maybe mixed? or possibly just bad breeding. =\\
Of course, you are frustrated, Squirtle! This is a new and trying experience at times. Don't worry, you will get the hang of being a dog lover!

I believe in you !


But Leto, I don't agree with Brody having ANY negative connection with the leash for now. Whatever happened to him, someone made him fearful of the leash in some way. So, sure, tugging and "NO"ing and even gasp..hitting a dog with a leash WILL work, it won't make your dog respect or love you. It will make your dog fear you (I speak here mainly about the hitting as yes, there is "some" tugging and correction in training).
But for a dog with fearful associations to something, you don't want to terrorize them with the object of their fear.

So, for now, no corrections while he is on lead. Use re-direction and positive direction. What you want to do is shape a positive behaviour.. Have the leash sitting out on the floor. If Brody even so happens to glance at the leash, treat him (or use whatever motivates Brody..for some dogs its play, but food is the big one). Use small treats when doing this. Bits of meat, bought treats or I use to use cheerios as they were small, easy to keep in your pocket.
Then gradually shape that into treating Brody when he goes near the leash, sniffs the leash, sees you holding the leash...Until he is allowing you to put the leash on. Then treat when he takes a step with the leash...See where we are going with this? You simply want to make the connection between object and good things happening.. I guarantee you success if you approach it this way..

Also, No more picking him up to go outside!
Start working on going outside when he doesn't have to go to the bathroom. Use words to associate the command with what you want. Ie, "Outside" for going outside but not to the bathroom..."Potty" or "Business" or whatever you want for going to the bathroom. Of course, if its an emergency and he has to go, pick him up for now. But I would really try not to. It will become a behaviour that will be hard to rid him of otherwise.
Poor little baby to be afraid of these things!

Good luck! I think you are doing really great work right now.
 
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squirtle

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Hi guys!

Last night went fairly well. I got home from work and went in and said hello to Dori (I do everything with her first so she doesn't feel like she has been replaced). Then I brought Brody outside, I did carry him out to the grass
It's just that he has to go because as soon as I put him in the grass he goes, but he won't walk to it. It happened the same as before though, I put him in the grass and he peed and ran to the door. I carried him back out to the grass and he did his "#2"
and ran back to the door. I just can't figure him out, if he has to go why not go?
Then I decided to work with him on the leash a bit. I attached the leash to his collar and let him run around like that for a while. Then we went out the front door and I managed to get him to walkout to the road. He shook his head a lot trying to shake the collar off but for the most part it went well. There was no rolling over and playing dead until we got back to the grass... As soon as we got there he immediately rolled onto his back and stuck his legs in the air. Could he just be scared of grass? It's odd, but he does like to roll around in the grass so it couldn't be that. I was proud of him for walking the bit that he did walk though.
It was progress.
I kept little doggie treats in my pockets all evening and rewarded him when he did something I have been working with him on. I think we have made progress with "sit". He does very well with it now.
He is still getting excited and running after Dori when she comes over the baby gate. He doesn't want to hurt her, he wants to play. I am able to keep him from running towards her when he is right in my eye sight. But for example, last night I was washing up dishes and I heard Dori jump over the gate. Immediately Brody ran towards her so she jumped back over and hid under my bed. I said "Brody no" and "stay" but he ignores me and keeps running until Dori is out of sight. Any idea on the best way to handle that?
I am going today to get Brody a harness to replace his collar. I think I may have better luck with that. I am also going to pick him up a tag, and him and Dori both a special treat. Dori has been so good through all of this and despite being harrassed by Brody when she comes into the living room she still ran in to get one more goodbye kiss before I left for work this morning
 

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I never said to hiy him with it. I yself would never hit a dog with anything, let alone a leash. But tugging and saying no is what I was told when we got the cats, to make him not chase them. But my dog is walked 5 times a day and has never been afraid of a leash.

Yeah.. let him know that the leash is a wonderful thing. Treat sand more treats while he is wearing it.. but not if he's acting scared.. then you'll only be rewarding scared behavior.

Have you thought about getting a crate to kennel train him? I crate trained my dog and he loves his kennel.. he will go in there if he wants to be alone or get away from the cats. Its like his own bedroom.

Another thing, you should get him a Kong. Its a large rubber toy that is hallow in the middle, you can fill it with goodies. I like to fill mine with Peanut butter and small peices of lunchmeat, but alot of dogs enjoy just kibble in it. It can keep them entertained for long periods of time.. and if given to him while Dory is out and about you could give it to him and it should distract him from her completely.

Eventually they will get used to each other. My dog still doesn't 'like' the cats.. but he puts up with them rubbing all over him.
 

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Tanya,

Sorry I missed this thread. Brody sounds like he did indeed come from a puppy mill and you will likely have better luck with getting him a harness. I would keep him on harness and lead inside the house, and when he runs at Dori, I would tug on the lead and tell him sharply NO CHASE. If he does it again, then put him into a dog crate for about 15 mins. You may think he wants to play with Dori, but he could hurt her until they find their way with each other.

He isn't afraid of the grass, he doesn't know what it is. Puppies from puppy mills are kept in cages so small you would be amazed. They are only let out when they are old enough to breed. When they have outlived their usefulness- or they get sick, the owners will just dump them somewhere, or tie them up and leave them.


I would get him neutered, and put him in obedience class right away. It will do everyone good especially Dori. You will not be able to control Dori, but you can control the dog once he learns basic obedience/

Bless your good-natured heart-
 

KitEKats4Eva!

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Isn't crate training, though, meant to be an on-the-whole positive experience and not used as a punishment?
 

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Leto: I didn't think you meant hitting..no worries
I just wanted to convey that you don't want to make leash training a negative thing with a fearful response (Ie, simply pulling and negative reinforcement).

Also, Tanya...Look around for a good trainer and research their methods. Bulldogs are notoriously stubborn. They need a consistent and firm handler, but you don't want to attend a class that focuses on corrections/choke or spike collars. It will undoubtedly make it harder on you and Brody but unfortunately there are still many trainers that employ only this to get results. I once (note "once") attended a class that had the trainer employing some rather dubious methods on the long-out-of-sight down. Needless to say, my boy didn't cotton to her fierce corrections and she almost lost a hand... I never went back to this class or any other such class.

Positive re-direction and motivation (ie treat/clicker or other) is the way to a stubborn dog's heart
and even then it can be trying at times
Good luck and let us know how the class goes.
 

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Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva!

Isn't crate training, though, meant to be an on-the-whole positive experience and not used as a punishment?
Yes. Crating should never be a punishment. Its a dog's safe haven.
 

leto86

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Originally Posted by Loveysmummy

Yes. Crating should never be a punishment. Its a dog's safe haven.
Yup. The only time we ever even shut the doors is if we have a repair guy coming to look at something, as Apollo isn't too fond of them at all.
 
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