Miscalculated for years

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F+V

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Good for you! I'm making food once a month and that's already too much for me :lol:
I use this and they don't show much on the label ImmoPlex Glandulars 60 Vegicaps
I emailed the manufacturer about the iodine content but don't think they have the asnwer to that...

It doesn't matter what form of potassium supplement I use, does it? I searched differences of potassium citrate, chloride, gluconate but didn't find meaningful answers. Morton lite salt contains potassium chloride.
 
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Jabzilla

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You're welcome, I'm very glad to help! =D Hmm, not knowing what the nutritional info is for the glandular supplement is a challenge. I don't use them since one of my cats can't eat beef, so I'm afraid I don't have any more info on that than you do. As for the potassium supplement goes, I'm not sure. I know mineral supplements that are chelated are more easily absorbed by the body, but I don't know what citrate, chloride, and gluconate mean either. I just looked through this Potassium Chloride vs. Potassium Citrate (livestrong.com) and it says potassium citrate is alkalizing and reduces urine acidity. I've never used a potassium supplement since my cats get all of theirs from their food via a combo of turkey, pork, rabbit, and/or kangaroo, so I'm not sure which of those types is best. If there's a potassium chelate, I'd aim for that.
 
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Rabbit is a good source of potassium! might have to try. can't handle the whole rabbit because it makes me feel sad and sorry...
I'm usually dreading having to make kitty food with grinder and everything but this time I'm a little excited to try the new recipe 😁
 
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A book called Raising Cats Naturally by Michelle Bernard lists nutritional value of 100g bone (doesn't say what bone) as 25,000mg calcium, 12,000mg phosphorus, 370mg magnesium, 700mg potassium, 9mg zinc and 0.5mg copper. So I created a new column in the spreadsheet to see how it looks if I replaced Chicken Leg Quarter w/S RMB with just bones, but the results are somewhat inconclusive in that calcium and phosphorus values skyrocketed. Michelle also writes that use of raw ground bone will change the Ca to P ratios substantially as well as many of the mineral figures, so I guess we don't really know the accurate values of raw ground bones... it's probably safer to add lacking microminerals in the forms of supplement.
 

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Yeah, I wish we had accurate info on the nutritional breakdowns of various animal bones. I agree that its safer to supplement what's missing rather than assuming it's there in the bones. Especially since those minerals are also found in various other meats and organs. If those aren't available then supplementing is the safe way to go.
 
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I got a reply from the manufacturer of ImmoPlex Glandulars 60 Vegicaps.

Because iodine is not typically found in appreciable levels in any of the tissues in the supplement, they haven't tested it specifically for iodine, nor would they expect it to contain significant levels of iodine.
 

TortieCat

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Hey there,
I HIGHLY recommend using a formulation sheet like this one Raw Fed and Nerdy Formulation Sheet - Raw Fed and Nerdy to check the nutritional information for your recipe. The sheet uses your cat's weight, calorie intake, and metabolic energy to calculate how much of every protein, fatty acid, vitamin, and mineral your cat needs based on NRC, FEDIAF, or AAFCO (you can switch between them on the sheet) requirements. If you plug in all of the ingredients and supplements you're using onto the sheet, it will show you what's too much/not enough/possibly missing. If you use a sheet, there isn't any guess work and you will know exactly how much of every nutrient your cat is getting from their food.
I also recently purchased this spreadsheet and completed the free course, they're awesome resources for anyone making their own pet food at home. They also have a FB group that has a lot of useful information!
 

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Hi, I’ve been looking for a sheet since forever. My cat has kidney failure, but I still feed him raw. I think I have some understanding for what he need lest and what he needs more of. All the sheets that I’ve found until now don’t show be the content that is in my formulated food and rather just show me what needs to be changed to what for a healthy cat. I hope this makes sense. Does the sheet that you recommended show things like phosphorus/phosphate %? Cause if so I think that I could make it work even if the sheet is meant for healthy cats :D
 

Jabzilla

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Hi, I’ve been looking for a sheet since forever. My cat has kidney failure, but I still feed him raw. I think I have some understanding for what he need lest and what he needs more of. All the sheets that I’ve found until now don’t show be the content that is in my formulated food and rather just show me what needs to be changed to what for a healthy cat. I hope this makes sense. Does the sheet that you recommended show things like phosphorus/phosphate %? Cause if so I think that I could make it work even if the sheet is meant for healthy cats :D
Hey there,
The RFN sheet shows you exactly how much of every vitamin, mineral, protein, fatty acid, etc is in both the recipe and each individual ingredient. It shows the amount of phosphorus in mg and provides a calcium to phos ratio. Both of those, and all of the other nutrient values change and update as you add or remove meats/ingredients from the recipe. For example, if you add some raw meaty bones, the amount of calcium and phos in mg on the sheet will increase based on what chosen RMB is. The information used is based on nutrition facts from the USDA food database. It doesn't tell you the phos percentage. Instead you get the actual physical amount of phos that's in the food.
 

TortieCat

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Hi, I’ve been looking for a sheet since forever. My cat has kidney failure, but I still feed him raw. I think I have some understanding for what he need lest and what he needs more of. All the sheets that I’ve found until now don’t show be the content that is in my formulated food and rather just show me what needs to be changed to what for a healthy cat. I hope this makes sense. Does the sheet that you recommended show things like phosphorus/phosphate %? Cause if so I think that I could make it work even if the sheet is meant for healthy cats :D
As J Jabzilla said the spreadsheet will show you how much phosphorus you have in your recipe (in mg) and it’ll show you the total weight of the recipe and the dry matter weight so you can calculate the % of phosphorus based on those numbers.
 
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