Stomatitis

tvet

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Hello. My cat, Sabboth, was diagnosed with stomatitis several years ago. He has had antibiotics and steroids on a few occasions to help with flare ups. At the beginning of the year he had an especially bad flare up. His vet recommended a dental cleaning and he went in for his appointment. When he was put under anesthesia, the vet said he "went blue" so they brought him out of it. They tried again with the same results. They are afraid to put him under, as am I, with the fear that he could die. They cleaned the best they could while bringing him out. That was in February. Since, I have been putting an additive in his water to reduce plaque build-up and put him on a wet food diet. He was back to almost normal for awhile. Now, he eats very little and has dropped almost 1 pound. He is lethargic and sleeps most of the time. He doesn't want to leave my side, which breaks my heart because I feel he is asking for help and I don't know what to do for him. I know antibiotics and steroids long term are not good for him. I am thinking of trying a cat food delivery service, like Nom Nom, to get him eating again. But it's not taking care of his main problem. Any suggestions? Thanks.
 

neely

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I'm sorry your cat and you are going through this health problem. :hugs: When you took him to the vet for a dental cleaning did you see a certified veterinary dental specialist, i.e. not your regular vet? What is a Veterinary Dentist? | AVDC.org This might help your cat's situation or at least give you some other options. Regarding anesthesia, some cat breeds who are brachycephalic have more difficulty when being put under and there are alternative anesthetics that may help your cat too. I had this experience with several of our cats and for that reason I only see a vet dental specialist now.

I thought this Article might give you some additional information: Gingivitis And Stomatitis In Cats
Perhaps other members can weigh in with their advice or suggestions. Keeping my fingers crossed for you. :crossfingers:
 

mrsgreenjeens

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I just read this yesterday regarding a slightly different issues (maybe)...mouth ulcers. This is from the website felinecrf.org. Perhaps something here would be useful: (sorry, it didn't "cut and paste" very well)

Mouth Ulcers: Holistic Treatments


Slippery elm bark can be made into a syrup and used to help heal mouth ulcers. This has been found to be a very effective treatment by many people on Tanya's CKD Support Group.

Another natural remedy for mouth ulcers is to mix white cheddar cheese with water to make a paste and spread it on the gums. The enzymes in the white cheddar cheese are supposed to eat the bacteria and help alleviate the infection, though I have not tried this myself and would not recommend it for dental problems other than mouth ulcers (see Related Diseases for more information on dealing with dental problems generally).

I tried eel serum homeopathic remedy for Tanya, and I would say it did help, though perhaps not as much as the slippery elm bark might have done.

Mouth Ulcers: Other Treatments


For really obstinate ulcers, talk to your vet about using sucralfate, which forms a protective coating over the ulcers and allows them to heal. Sucralfate is discussed below.

For severe mouth ulcers, antibiotics may be necessary.
 

posiepurrs

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When my boy Boo was still with me (crossed the bridge due to kidney failure in Feb this year) he dealt with stomatitis for about half of his life. I researched and found this website: Feline chronic lymphocytic plasmacytic gingivostomatitis It helped Boo immensely. I stopped feeding him any poultry, took away dry food and stopped giving him steroids. I also used a raw honey and slippery elm solution for him twice a day. When he had a flare up I gave him pulse doses of antibiotics. Here is the way I made the slippery elm solution. Mix 6 mls water, 1/4 teaspoon raw honey, 1- 350mg capsule slippery elm. Mix together - let sit for a few minutes - draw up into 1 ml syringes and give twice daily for maintenance - give more frequently when treating severe mouth ulcers. I am NOT saying this is your solution, just that this is what worked for us. When we stated treating him like this, he never had an issue eating again and his death breath subsided. Before, if he breathed in your face it was nauseating. He maintained his weight until his kidneys started to go.
 
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tvet

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Update: Sabboth has recently had bad flare ups of his stomatitis. Like, screaming out in pain bad. So I took him to the emergency vet who prescribed gabapentin (sp?) and an antibiotic. She recommends teeth extraction. She said the fang teeth are especially bad. So I am making an appointment with the feline dentist today. My new question is, it is over an hour away from where I live. The emergency vet was about 50 minutes away and it stressed him out so bad, which research says can aggravate the stomatitis even worse. Is there anything I can give him to keep him calm during the long trip? Thanks.
 

neely

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There are certain anti-anxiety medications for cats. However, you should speak with your vet, (feline dental specialist), before administering anything prior to surgery since it may or may not be in your cat's best interest. Best wishes for your cat's upcoming dental surgery. :crossfingers:
 
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Talien

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Extraction is, unfortunately, the only "cure" for Stomatitis. Anything else is basically just managing the symptoms because it doesn't do anything for the root cause, which is an exaggerated immune reaction to the teeth themselves (or more specifically, to bacteria on the surface of the teeth). Regular cleanings can sometimes help because it cuts down on bacterial growth but it sounds like that isn't going to be possible for your Cat. One of my fosters had Stomatitis and an Assisi Loop brought the inflammation down by about 50%, but that was still just managing the symptoms and it continue to be a problem until her teeth were pulled.
 

mrsgreenjeens

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Yes, to answer your question, as Neely said, call the cat dentist and ask if there is anything you can give him to calm him for the trip. Hopefully they can advise you.

Let us know how it goes :vibes: :vibes: :vibes:
 

daftcat75

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My previous vet has recommended gabapentin to reduce the stress of a vet visit. But you'll want to discuss this with your vet as they may not want gabapentin in his system before a procedure.

My Krista had resorptive lesions. Her mouth was eating her teeth. We did the best we could with piecemeal extractions as the teeth and roots were going bad. Ultimately, her vets said they didn't want to extract any more teeth and recommended I took her to a veterinary dentist instead. For us, the closest veterinary dentist that could see her within two weeks instead of two to six months like all the others was still 2 hours away. Krista fortunately travels well. But I wanted to make the dentist day easier on her. So I got us a hotel room in the dentist's city. We arrived on a Tuesday, her appointment was Wednesday morning, and we departed for home on Thursday. We repeated this in two weeks for her follow up visit. This meant on the mornings she saw the dentist, her car ride was only 10 minutes across town.

Krista had resorptive lesions and not stomatitis. But if a full mouth extraction is an option for Sabboth, I highly recommend it. Battling her dental issues for the better part of two years was terrible on the both of us. Those all ended the afternoon I brought her back from having her remaining teeth extracted by the dentist. She doesn't miss her teeth at all. Last year, I was taking her to the vet every couple of months because her eating was slowed or stopped. This year, not a single, "she's not eating" visit. She makes a little more mess than before occasionally flinging her food. But aside from that, she still puts away her fair share of food.
 
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