Only senior cats for senior citizens: good idea or not?

solomonar

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The probability does not apply to individual cases.

Also, they are a number of causes of death. If one wants to relate individuals to statistics, then the risk shall be computed taking into account most of the risk factors, such as occupation, weight, heart diseases, family, smoking, drinking a.s.o. Each factor shalll be weighted by the expected impact and the cross-influence between them should be analyzed and translated into a matrix.

To me, such a complex calculation falls far behind the capability of an animal shelter. Accepting only age as a risk factor is misleading. I don't say age is to be neglected, but looking only to age is a mathematical mistake.

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Why somebody will bother to gather personal data (which in Europe is not a simple operation, I don't know how it is in the USA), then evaluate the accuracy, spot the errors, and then go to a complex calculation, which results in percentages which at their turn is very complicated to judge?!

In my opinion, it is more simple to ask every single adopter, regardless the age, about backup plans and to include a "return-at-will" clause into the adoption contract.

This contract provision does not mean that potential adopters shouldn't be interviewed.

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In my country people are happy to find adopters, very few- if any - question the capacity of the adopter.
 
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Dacatchair

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Barring the more extreme situations, I really think it is 6 of one 1/2 dozen of the other... People over 60 are more likely to unexpectedly die, or be unable to care for a cat, but as long as they are healthy, older people tend to be more stable and are more able to fully commit. People who are younger often have their lives change in unexpected directions, they are more likely to marry, divorce, or have children who may have allergies. Young people are more likely to loose or gain a job or need to move, or there is an unexpected opportunity, and it seems these changes often won't work well for a cat. Young people with many responsibilities are often less able to prioritize the needs of the cat... So either way, cats can end up needing another home. And it is always really sad as this is often hard on them...
 

Kokomo

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Regardless of right or wrong morally and ethically I am pretty sure that refusing an adoption based only on age is illegal in America. Same for anyone refused because of something covered under ADA laws.
 

Willowy

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Regardless of right or wrong morally and ethically I am pretty sure that refusing an adoption based only on age is illegal in America. Same for anyone refused because of something covered under ADA laws.
I think the age discrimination laws only apply to employment and housing, not animal adoption :/.
 

Kokomo

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I think the age discrimination laws only apply to employment and housing, not animal adoption :/.
From folks who I have known who have pushed it it applies to a lot of things. I would seriously question the legality of turning someone down for anything over age alone.
 

Willowy

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It's possible that would be illlegal in the US. The OP is in Germany and I'm not familiar with their laws.
 

CatladyJan

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Regardless of right or wrong morally and ethically I am pretty sure that refusing an adoption based only on age is illegal in America. Same for anyone refused because of something covered under ADA laws.
I'm honestly not certain if that is illegal here in the states or not.

We do need to consider things that rescues and humane societies look for in proper homes and someone who is unable to properly care for any pet due to age or disability should not be allowed any pet. It is not age discrimination when pets cannot be adopted by minors.

I don't have a problem with an older person/couple having a kitten, but I honestly think fostering is the best all around for all involved.
 

CatladyJan

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From folks who I have known who have pushed it it applies to a lot of things. I would seriously question the legality of turning someone down for anything over age alone.
As I just stated, then it would be discrimination to adopt to a 16 year old in the US, but it is not because that person is a minor and unable to make adult decisions and or legally bound.
 

Kokomo

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It's possible that would be illlegal in the US. The OP is in Germany and I'm not familiar with their laws.
I have no idea what laws are like there! It seems messy to me, but might be totally legal there.

As I just stated, then it would be discrimination to adopt to a 16 year old in the US, but it is not because that person is a minor and unable to make adult decisions and or legally bound.
Underage is not a protected class. It is totally legal to not allow certain things to minors. It is after a certain age, or the person has a disability, when they fall into a protected class. And denying services or such things only due to something that is considered a protected class gets really messy legally.
 

solomonar

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1) Simple question: what does mean "old person"? Is it 65 y? 60? 70?
Is the definition to be related to the average life span? Or to what demographic indicator?

2) Each country, region, area have their own demographic status and health status. Although I am not familiar with USA demography, given its large area and population, I dare to assume that each state and county (and even each neighborhood!) has a distinct demographic situation. And its particular health circumstances.

3) Everyone thinks of "old age" through his/her own experience and knowledge. But what I believe about old persons is not the same as other ones believe.
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These 3 arguments above work in the same line as my previous post: mathematically speaking, there is no ground (or the factors range is too complex to be handled) to relate the adoption potential assessment to the age of the applicant. I don't think maths can be defeated by contracts or by procedures: -)
 
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