Likelihood of trapping the same cat?

thewarriors

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Hello, i trapped two kittens last night using a drop trap with the intent to adopt them out. My initial plan was to TNR them once they got older but i decided to try and give them a home. They’re staying in my shed right now as i cannot bring them inside my home. I also cant foster fail either cause i already have 3 cats and gf says no more.

Now i am still trying to find them a home, but in the event that i fail. I’m considering dropping them off at the ACC here in NYC or releasing them with the intent to trap them again. My question is if i decide to release them, what are my chances at trapping them again using a drop trap?
 
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thewarriors

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For those wondering, they are too young for surgery right now and can still be socialized.
 

Jcatbird

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Socialize them and you may not need to re trap. They may come right to you. However, can you make the shed into a safe home until you find them a permanent home? Releasing them before spaying or neutering means you are very likely to have a pregnancy or they will leave the area. You have them now, take full advantage of this. Keep them until spayed or neutered! This allows socializing time and will allow you to monitor them once they are spayed or neutered. Once that is done you have greatly increased their safety in so many ways! If hormones don’t kick in, they are far more likely to stay right there in or near that shed. I understand you have three cats but getting them social is a primary concern along with spay neutering. If they can be located and isolated in a bathroom or other space, they will be safe and quickly socialize. Spend as much time as possible with them wherever you keep them. Having done kitten rescues, I know we get attached but look at it this way, if you get them safely adopted, if others ever show up, you will have freed up the space to help another. Bravo for helping them! You just saved two lives. You are a kitty guardian and that makes you a kitty hero! :clap2::rock::goldstar:
 

kittychick

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I know this post is a few days old, but I wanted to say how great it is that you’re caring so much for these babies now AND that you’re concerned about their future! As Jcatbird Jcatbird said - you’re a kitty hero for caring for them!

And Jcatbird Jcatbird said so much of what I would have said - she gave great advice (as always!). I definitely would do my best to avoid re-releasing them if at all possible (two feral kittens in the hand are better then two in the bush, avoiding being caught :lol:). Especially since they’re too young to fix - - - kittens can get pregnant at 4 months (WAY before most people realize) and they don’t hesitate to mate with family members. The big bonus is they’re at an age that socializing should be relatively easy (socializing after young kitten stage is absolutely possible - but 99.9% of the time it’s far faster when they’re small. The absolute best thing would be to start socializing them immediately. If you do bring them into your home - - a bathroom works fine if you don’t have a room you can spare for the (hopefully short) time you’re socializing. Also -if they are coming in temporarily (and in this heat, being in a home is preferable if at all possible), even if they can’t be fixed yet, if possible I’d take them to your vet to get them treated for fleas and other parasites. You can do that yourself, but having a vet look at them (particularly since they’ll hopefully go right from your care to a forever home) would be a big positive draw for potential adopters. And lots of us in this forum have socialized kittens - -so I’m sure you’ll get plenty of help/advice from members if you need it!

I also agree that if you have no option to bring them inside (which is definitely best), you could certainly try to keep them in the shed safely (with safely being the operative word!). You’d want to make sure they can’t dig out, etc. I’m guessing since you mentioned New York you live there - - so one of my big concerns about them being in an enclosed outdoor shed is heat. Kittens can overheat VERY quickly. I know in Ohio we’ve had really high temps and it’s not even August… and it’s likely even warmer inside the shed then outside. If you’re going to go that direction - I’d at least get a cheap outdoor thermometer and set it up in there for a few days to see how hot it does get in there. The last thing you want is for them to succumb to heatstroke!

And to avoid the dreaded (kidding on that - we’ve had several of them!) “foster fail” - do what we do - rope friends who might actually be considering adopting a kitten and have them come help socialize. It helps expose the kittens to more people (always a plus), will likely help the socializing go more quickly, and biggest bonus? While helping socialize, sometimes they fall in love - - we’ve found homes for many kittens that way (we had a friend cat sit for a whole litter over a weekend - - and our friend fell so in love in this 3 days she adopted all 5!!!!!

Lastly (maybe I missed it) - you mention they’re too young to fix - - do you know how young they are? Is mom around Or is she gone?

I hope you keep us posted - - Would love to hear how this goes for you!
 
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