Introducing new cat

LoveIgor18

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Hi all!
I've read a lot of forum posts about resident cat being aggressive towards new cat, but not the other way around, so I'm hoping to find some shared experiences here with this post.
My husband and I have been slightly busier with our work and felt like our loving cat, Igor (1y 8mo), could be lonely from having to spend more time alone in the house. He meows a lot and follows us everywhere, so we figured it might be time to get him a friend. We decided to adopt a new girl, Ginger (8mo).
I'm current trying to follow Jackson Galaxy's method in introducing our cats. We currently have Ginger in her base camp (2nd floor bathroom), and she seems a bit timid and stressed so we think she will need some time to adjust. Igor has come by and investigated a lot, and seems pretty nonchalant. He also spends most of his days downstairs with us. However, he comes upstairs at night and meows nonstop and I think it's scaring her (heard her hiss once in response and lots of clanging and banging like she's running around). I'm so worried that this might be stressing her out and preventing her from adapting to her new home. Does anyone have tips on what I should do to help Ginger (or quiet Igor down)? We do not let our cats into our bedroom but we have 2 floors with plenty of space to explore.
 
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LoveIgor18

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Update: now they are both meowing nonstop! DX
 

ArtNJ

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That is probably good. Means they are curious, I think? Anyway, being stressed and hissing during introductions is normal. The passage of time with nothing bad happening is mostly how they get it out of their system. Everything else Jackson Galaxy recommends is mostly gravy -- its really the passage of time. Oh, do the steps he recommends, but just don't take them as a bible. For example, if feeding on opposite sides of the door is causing too much stress, don't do it -- move the bowls further from the door or do it later, or even not at all.

At the end of the process, they may hiss and have some stress when you put them together. The really important part is getting them comfortable enough that a little hissing (and maybe a get away swat) is all they do, and there is no actual fighting. With time together, they can work through the rest.

It doesn't change anything which cat is the stressed one. It is more often the resident, but that is because the resident tends to be older (which makes it a bit harder), and the newcomer is often a kitten (usually very adaptable). But the resident being chill and the newcomer being stressed is plenty common too -- maybe more common when they are both past kittenhood.
 
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LoveIgor18

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That is probably good. Means they are curious, I think? Anyway, being stressed and hissing during introductions is normal. The passage of time with nothing bad happening is mostly how they get it out of their system. Everything else Jackson Galaxy recommends is mostly gravy -- its really the passage of time. Oh, do the steps he recommends, but just don't take them as a bible. For example, if feeding on opposite sides of the door is causing too much stress, don't do it -- move the bowls further from the door or do it later, or even not at all.

At the end of the process, they may hiss and have some stress when you put them together. The really important part is getting them comfortable enough that a little hissing (and maybe a get away swat) is all they do, and there is no actual fighting. With time together, they can work through the rest.

It doesn't change anything which cat is the stressed one. It is more often the resident, but that is because the resident tends to be older (which makes it a bit harder), and the newcomer is often a kitten (usually very adaptable). But the resident being chill and the newcomer being stressed is plenty common too -- maybe more common when they are both past kittenhood.
Thank you! She is now taking naps on my lap (no petting yet) and I think it's a good sign. Given that she was a stray it might take some time and patience :3
 
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LoveIgor18

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