Will my cat be ok if his teeth are removed?

georgiagirl8

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I had the vet check stinkie's mouth and she said it's in very bad shape. She said he needs surgery to have all of his teeth extracted. She said he'll be able to eat anything and will be like a different cat afterwards, which sounds great. But it still worries me. How can he chew? He loves dry cat food. Has anyone else had to have all of a cat's teeth removed before? How did the cat deal with it afterwards?
 

ldg

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Oh, I'm sorry! The good news is, your vet is right! There are a number of toothless kitties on TCS, and I think most of them eat at least some dry food. I'm sure they'll check in, but if his mouth is in such bad shape, he'll thank you and be happier for it! And he can still enjoy his kibble. Most cats don't chew much as it is. :hugs: :vibes: :vibes: :vibes: :vibes: :vibes:
 

Willowy

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One of my mom's cats lost most of her teeth (she has a couple fangs left but no back teeth). She gets mostly canned food, but she still eats her kibble just fine.
 

white cat lover

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Two of mine have no teeth, and one of my parent's cats has no teeth.

They all eat canned & dry food w/o any problems at all. All at a good weight, look good, and are happy.
 

orientalslave

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I've seen a cat with just canine teeth eat a mouse - whole, head first!  I'm sure if your cat's teeth are that bad she will be a lot better off without them.  It might not be too wonderful immediately afterwards, but the long-term benefits are not only will she lose the discomfort she probably has and be able to eat properly, but bad teeth are associated (in humans at least) with quite a few other health problems.
 

momofmany

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Was your cat diagnosed with LPGS (Lyphocyctic, plasmacyctic gingivitis stomatitis)? That is an auto-immune disease where a cat's body thinks their teeth are foreign invaders. My Stumpy has that disease, and had the last of his teeth pulled about 5 years ago. He eats dry food with no problems at all, in fact, he loves to steal dog kibble, which is much larger than cat kibble. He just sucks it down. Stumpy was eating kibble at the vets after the teeth extraction before the drugs had worn off from the surgery (the vet tech had some food out for another cat and didn't think Stumpy would be interested in food - ha! Shows them). I was talking to a vet last week about the topic, and he claims that most cats don't really chew kibble in the first place.

I wouldn't worry too much, they adapt very well.
 

angela smith

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Hi, I was searching the internet and saw this site and clicked on to read - im sure this is what my pedigree maine coon has and my vet has recommended extracting all his teeth. I feel so horrified by this that I have put it off for a while and just keep taking him for antibiotic injections that are clearly not working. I'm so sad at the thought of the poor soul having to end up with no teeth - he's only a couple of years old! I was pleased to see that your reply (and others) to the first lady asking about toothless cats seemed to be fairly positive on how they would cope. I think it's me who won't! Do you soften the kibble at all? I'm doing that just now as my cats will only eat their special maine coon kibble and its brick hard!

Regards, angela.
 

ldg

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Again, I expect the others will chime in, but I can say with confidence that they do not soften the kibble. There's no need to. It sounds like your little fella is in a LOT of pain. I hope you'll be able to get comfortable with this. I don't know if you've had a toothache before... but your baby will really thank you for ending that pain! :rub: :heart2:
 

nurseangel

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My RB cat Redman had to have many of his teeth removed.  He had teeth cleanings prior, but needed the extractions anyway.  He actually seemed a happier cat after the teeth were gone; he was in pain and we didn't even realize.  I don't recall him having any problems with eating after he recovered from the surgery. 
 
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catwoman707

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Yes, absolutely!

There have been several cats through our rescue, the latest one was Cookie, a feral prego who I trapped and had her babies the next day.

She must have suffered terribly as any/all kitties, they are so good at hiding their pain but feel just as much as we do.

Within 2 days after the removal of all of her teeth, she was scooping up canned, learning how I'm sure, and as soon as I put dry in her cage she was chowing again, but without the pain!

She is now living her life out at an awesome sanctuary, any cat's idea of pure heaven, since I could not put her back where she came from, and doing great.

Food for thought, if you've ever cleaned up a cat's vomit not too long after they ate, notice the dry food still looks whole? They don't chew their food up like it sounds anyway!

Kitty will do fine, no worries  
 

greycat2

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 I have a foster that has had 7 of his teeth removed and may need more done eventually. (He and his brother have auto-immune issues). He's doing fine eating dry kibble and feeling much better. He was back to eating dried in a couple of days. (We're watching him closely on his remaining teeth.)
 

novemberflowers

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My grandma's cat needed to have all her teeth removed and she is doing great! Eats dry food..and you wouldn't even know she didn't have teeth unless you inspected her mouth!
 

alicejane

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Our kitty has only the two mandibular cuspids left - bottom "canines." Vet is concerned that sometimes, when you extract those cuspids, the mandible (jaw bone) can lost its integrity. He says those teeth help stabilize the bone but is ready to extract them if she continues to be uncomfortable.

Oh, I'm SO glad to see this!! Our VERY favorite kitty - the one that make my sweet husband (a "dog man") fall completely and utterly in LOVE with cats - has the same problem that is cited here. She has had several extractions; the vet was always hopeful to spare a few teeth. But, the poor baby keeps having problems. With each extraction, she did MUCH better... until it would flare up again.

Our kitty has only the two mandibular cuspids left - bottom "canines." Vet is concerned that sometimes, when you extract those cuspids, the mandible (jaw bone) can lost its integrity. He says those teeth help stabilize the bone but is ready to extract them if she continues to be uncomfortable.

I have TWO questions:

1) Has anyone here seen this happen with full dental extraction? Anyone see the mandible become resorbed and kitty is left with pretty much no jaw? Or the bone becomes fragile and can fracture while romping with the other kitties.

2) She has trouble eating and it LOOKS like those monster cuspids are poking her mouth - the junction between the lip and the upper mandible. I don't know the name for that part of the anatomy - but ever since the top two cuspids were extracted, she's looked like she has had a lot of difficulty eating. I'm assuming there is some poking going on - our vet doesn't think so. I'm curious - anyone here see that happen? I love my vet, but I have to ask you guys - you all are so smart and experienced!! This is our first stomatitis kitty. Poor lass.

Thank you for your time!! BIG HUG!
 
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sondrann

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Hi All

My eight year old indoor Birman female cat has only 4 front teeth remaining. She has eosinophilic granuloma, an autoimmune disease which inflames her gums and rots her teeth. Unfortunately the cortisone injections she has been having no longer seem to be holding the disease and she will soon have to have the remaining teeth removed I fear. I was concerned about how she would be able to eat, as both my babies live on Hills dry food. Also, my vet has told me that her tongue may hang out of her mouth after. Has anyone else experienced this happening? How do they cope? I only care about her comfort and wellbeing, not how she will look.
Sondra
 

txcatmom

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I'm pretty sure the 4 front teeth aren't being used right now for chewing kibble.  So, there should be no difference in the mechanism of her eating.   We have one who had all but the 4 front teeth removed and her tongue sticks out a tiny bit at times.  She doesn't seem to notice.

Good luck.  Hope your kitty feels better soon.
 

gooned

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My 14 y/o cat only has her front canines left. She eats everything in sight including kibble. I think she just swallows the kibble but every so often hear some crunching. Apparently their gums harden allowing them to chew. 
 

beth1955

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My 18 yr old cat was recently diagnosed with stomatitis.  She is getting over a URI right now, but will have some teeth extracted after that.............First time in my 58 yrs that I've ever heard of that! Sounds like it's not that uncommon!!
 

callista

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IIRC, cats, being carnivores, have sharp, pointed teeth because they use them mostly to hold on to prey and to tear it apart into swallowable chunks while eating it. They don't grind their food when they chew, like we do (humans are omnivorous, so our back teeth are large, with broad tops). At one point when poor Christy threw up a hairball right after she had her breakfast of dry kibble, I noticed that practically all of the kibble was still whole--and Christy's not a particularly hasty eater.
 
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