Why do breeders wait until the kitten is at least 12 Weeks?

Alexis1993

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Why do cat breeders wait until the kitten is at least 12 weeks and dog breeders usually at 8 weeks to give them to the owners, why the difference?
 

lutece

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Here are a couple of articles that might help.

How young is too young? How old should a kitten be when it goes to a new home?

Early weaning increases aggression and stereotypic behaviour in cats
 

goingpostal

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Dogs aren't cats for one thing, why would we treat one species the same as a completely different one? It's based on what has proven to be best for the animal.
 
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Alexis1993

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Dogs aren't cats for one thing, why would we treat one species the same as a completely different one? It's based on what has proven to be best for the animal.
Well of course I know they arent the same, i wanted know the reason as to why , and i know its best for the animal if breeders decide to do that.
 

Willowy

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Many dog breeders keep the puppies until 12 weeks, too, especially small breeds. But this is really only advisable if they're doing some training, or else the pup misses out on some valuable training time.

But dogs are pack animals, and will look to their human for guidance once they leave their mother. Cats aren't pack animals, and they don't learn cat lessons from humans, so if a kitten hasn't learned his cat lessons from his mother and littermates, watch out!
 
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Alexis1993

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Many dog breeders keep the puppies until 12 weeks, too, especially small breeds. But this is really only advisable if they're doing some training, or else the pup misses out on some valuable training time.

But dogs are pack animals, and will look to their human for guidance once they leave their mother. Cats aren't pack animals, and they don't learn cat lessons from humans, so if a kitten hasn't learned his cat lessons from his mother and littermates, watch out!
Thank you this answers my question
 

sivyaleah

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Aside from learning manners, reputable breeders keep them longer for health reasons. When you get a cat from a breeder they have already brought the kittens for their initial shots, and other types of basic health care that may be necessary.

Additionally sometimes a breeder is considering keeping one of the kittens for their own breeding program and it can be difficult to tell if a particular kitten is the one they want until it's a bit older and their personality, behavior, appearance and health is further assessed.
 

cataholic07

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The best breeders also spay/neuter prior to being allowed to take home the kitten as well so that's why they wait for that. Usually it cant be done any sooner then 11 weeks old size wise. Kittens who stay with litter mates and mom until 12 weeks old do tend to be the most socialized and well balanced kitten. The younger you get the kitten the higher risk you have of behavioral issues. Especially if they are to be an only cat. They just seem to be more well adjusted, less bitey/scratchy and seem to do better with resident cats or any new future cats.
 

Krienze

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Well of course I know they arent the same, i wanted know the reason as to why , and i know its best for the animal if breeders decide to do that.
Honestly that's pretty much the reason though. Dogs develop faster than Cats, I think.
 

lutece

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Honestly that's pretty much the reason though. Dogs develop faster than Cats, I think.
I don't think dogs develop faster. Puppies are very immature when they go to new homes. They are just a different species with different needs, so it makes more sense for them to leave home at an immature developmental stage. Willowy explained it well, I think:
[...] dogs are pack animals, and will look to their human for guidance once they leave their mother. Cats aren't pack animals, and they don't learn cat lessons from humans, so if a kitten hasn't learned his cat lessons from his mother and littermates, watch out!
 
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