Who likes honey?

furmonster mom

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I do! I do!  I especially love it when our food co-op has raw, unfiltered honey available.  YUM

My uncle used to have a couple hives, but he gave up beekeeping because it was so labor intensive... especially harvesting.

As many of you might know, honeybee populations have declined over the last several years due to a wide variety of environmental factors.

So, when my friend showed this to me, I was completely blown away....

It's called Flow Hive, a new kind of bee hive that you can actually tap to harvest the honey without disturbing the bees... amazing...

They have a ton of detailed info on their Indigogo funding site.

 
 

Winchester

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Love honey! Not in tea or anything, but I love to make salad dressings and enjoy cooking and baking with it.

Now, that's a great set-up!
 

MoochNNoodles

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That is very cool!! I love honey but I've been having trouble eating it; as in getting the itchy mouth and throat. The last time actually made me nervous enough that I took 2 benadryl! Im hoping it had more tondo with being the store bought kind than anything. I need to get more local honey.
 
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furmonster mom

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Locally sourced raw honey has been touted to help allergies.  The theory being that it's made with local pollens, and the bee's enzymes help the human body cope with them better.  It has to be raw, unprocessed, unheated honey.  Heat kills the enzymes.

It's so tempting to get one and jump right into backyard beekeeping with this.  But I do know there is more to keeping a healthy hive than that.  However, with this system, you don't have to crack the hive more than maybe twice a year, instead of every month of harvest.  Happy, less stressed bees = more honey, and maybe even more bees.  Who knows what the long term benefits could bee.
 
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blueyedgirl5946

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Is there life without it. I put it on my toast, in my cereal, oatmeal, etc. I also keep a mixture of half/half honey and vinegar for medicinal purposes. I love raw honey. :wavey:
 

nurseangel

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Me!  Me!  I love honey.    

I do a small tomato garden every year and don't use any type of pesticides because I don't want to risk killing bees.  Don't really want to kill anything...
...but if the bees go, likely so do we.

Thank you for sharing the video; it's fascinating.
 

MoochNNoodles

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Locally sourced raw honey has been touted to help allergies.  The theory being that it's made with local pollens, and the bee's enzymes help the human body cope with them better.  It has to be raw, unprocessed, unheated honey.  Heat kills the enzymes.

It's so tempting to get one and jump right into backyard beekeeping with this.  But I do know there is more to keeping a healthy hive than that.  However, with this system, you don't have to crack the hive more than maybe twice a year, instead of every month of harvest.  Happy, less stressed bees = more honey, and maybe even more bees.  Who knows what the long term benefits could bee.
I see what you did there! 

 
Me!  Me!  I love honey.    

I do a small tomato garden every year and don't use any type of pesticides because I don't want to risk killing bees.  Don't really want to kill anything...
...but if the bees go, likely so do we.

Thank you for sharing the video; it's fascinating.
I try very hard to use only things in my garden that will keep it safe for the good critters!  We moved to a more rural area when we bought our house so I drive by a lot of farm fields.  I see flat beds with lots of bee hives on them parked next to the fields or sometimes in them.  And then I hear a crop duster go over and I wonder if that isn't harming the bees they have brought in!  I also wonder if those bees go to make the local honey!  I'm no expert on farming and I'm learning a lot about my little garden; so I've definitely got more questions than answers.  (It's so hard to lose a harvest to pests and disease!)

I am allergic to bees so we won't be trying any bee keeping; but I do want to keep my yard as bee friendly as possible.  (We seem to get a lot of yellow jackets around here.)  I've seen some things that suggest you need to watch where your flowers are sourced from too.  
 

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Me!  Me!  I love honey.    
Me too.. so much it's probably the biggest problem for me with losing weight.    Honey in my tea.  And I love to get a good natural yoghurt, pour a very generous amount of unboiled, organic honey over it, mix well and scoff.
 
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furmonster mom

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Me!  Me!  I love honey.    
Me too.. so much it's probably the biggest problem for me with losing weight.    Honey in my tea.  And I love to get a good natural yoghurt, pour a very generous amount of unboiled, organic honey over it, mix well and scoff.
LOL

I am also trying to watch my sugar intake.  It's hard, because I've always had a terrible sweet tooth.

I have a tiny baby spoon that I use for putting honey in my tea, it comes to about 1/4 teaspoon.

As for yogurt... I buy the plain and flavor with a tablespoon of jam. 
 

sivyaleah

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Oh honey yum!

Years ago, I was at a restaurant in Napa Valley (Ad Hoc, has gotten much more well known since I was there).  For dessert, they served a little bowl of honey with the comb, to eat with a cheese plate.  The honey was amazing and I asked where it was from. They told me they got it from a small local farm store "down the road", it was sourced from a specific pasture where wildflowers grew nearby.  The next day, I bought out whatever was left to bring back home.  After that was gone, I ordered it online.  I still do now and then.

One of my friends was in Italy on vacation and brought me back honey made by nuns at a monastery.  Very light and delicate.  I treasured and nurtured that small jar for over 2 years, only using it for special occasions.

I love the nuances of flavor from the different flowers the bees are visiting.  I still haven't tried Tupelo, it's SO expensive but I'm sure I'll break down eventually.
 

flowercats

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I grew up with a honey pot on the table for daily consumption. My grandparents raised honey bees and were active in Apimondia (worldwide beekeeper's association) for decades. MANY of the recipes Grandma used included honey, including the family's favorite Christmas cookies and her delicious oatmeal bread. Now I'm the baker, and honey is a staple still! We also dress wounds with honey. After Grandpa cut his fingers with a chainsaw and they were stitched, he dressed them with honey and his doctors were amazed at how quickly he healed. I use it instead of Neosporin.
 

denice

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I grew up with raw honey that my dad harvested himself.  He rarely got stung but I never even got close enough to watch.  He loved the honeycomb the most.  I rarely have honey any more except for holiday baking.
 
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furmonster mom

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For those who like the honeycomb, the folks who designed the Flow Hive have designed it in such a way that you can just buy panels that fit into a traditional hive.  You can "mix & match" traditional panels next to Flow panels, so you can have the best of both worlds.  Ingenious.

Still, you'd have to crack the hive to get the comb, which kind of defeats the purpose of the Flow Hive... so maybe have one of each type. 
 
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