What would you do?????

catsareok

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MY kitty just turned 21, We luv her to death, But we know she is not suffering we think, she is definitely senile, howls at night,
screams at me early morning, or all the time, I sleep about 3 hours straight most nights, not healthy for me, I am retired, the wife works,
I still get up at 6 am everyday, to make sure she is up,, any our girl Minca pees all over the place, we have 3 litter pans for her, I guess what I am asking is what would you do, we have bin tops all over to keep her from peeing, it is a daily thing for me to keep cleaning up, she really has no idea where her litter pan is, because she tries doing it right in front of me,, she looks in the litter pans, and is not sure if ok,, I don't' know, she loves us and we luv her, I am so tired of doing this day in and day out,, Does any of you do this for your elderly kitty? she purrs, lays on my lap watching Tv .. besides the howling and crying, and peeeing we luv her,,, advice would help Thank you so much, sorry I suck at explaining things typing,, used to get in trouble at work all the time... they say I come off as pissed, ok I agree a little..
 

jen

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Well, I think first of all it is important to know what her most recent bloodwork results were, to know more about her health up until this point. When was that last done? That will give us an idea of what might be going on. How long has everything you mentioned been going on?

Increased urination could be a sign of kidney failure which is very common in older cats esp if she is losing weight/dehydrated or on an all dry diet.
Also could be thyroid issues, if her appetite is strong but she is skinny.
Increased urination with increased drinking and being overweight could be diabetes.
How is her appetite?
Excessive meowing at night could be high blood pressure.
Is she urinating large amounts? Is it uncontrolled like she can't hold it in?

So many possibilities. Bloodwork and a vet check would definitely be a good idea to know what you are dealing with.
 

MissClouseau

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I would take her to the vet to make sure there isn't something we should treat, and if it's just an old age thing, I would be there for the cat. If I get lucky enough to be old myself one day, I will also need loved ones' patience and help.

Not to say I would ignore my own health completely, but there are things to try like ear plugs or sound-proofing a room for sleep. Puppy pads for urine or hiring someone for cleaning weekly.

I completely understand your complaints, it's not an easy situation to go through daily. But it's a part of the deal.
 

FeebysOwner

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Hi. I agree with the others about a full geriatric check up with the vet. That means: full body check, complete blood panel (CBC, Chemistry Profile, thyroid) and at least a urinalysis. Rule out any chance of a health issue first and foremost. Based on her age, you might want to ask the vet about x-rays of her spine/legs to look for arthritis. After that, as long as she is eating/drinking/peeing/pooping OK, and seems to be enjoying life, deal with the rest for what it is.

An elderly cat can require special attention just like many elderly people do. Puppy pee pads, either on the floor, or in very low sided boxes is worth a shot to see if she might use those - there is a possibility at that age she has some arthritis and is not comfortable getting in and out of the litter boxes you have. And, getting rid of the urine smell in those areas she has gone will help to reduce the chance of her going in those places again and again. Even younger cats who have had accidents will continue to go outside their boxes if they can smell where they peed elsewhere. As far as the howling, while confusion may be part of it, I believe there is a 'feeling secure' issue behind it sometimes - love on her, pet her, cuddle her when she howls as much as you can. And, screaming in the AM, would suggest to me hunger. I don't know how you feed her, but at her age, you might want to consider leaving some food out for her overnight and see if that helps.

I also don't know what her sleep set up is, but it might help to give her a place near you at night, if she doesn't have one already. At her age - I would give her a food and water dish, as well as a litterbox nearby that area too - she's entitled to some 'spoiling'.

And, consider this: if she can find her food/water dishes, then her dementia may not be as bad as you think and it is very possible there are other reasons that she can't 'seem to find' her litterboxes.

Feeby is not nearly as old as your cat (15+ yo), but she does her own form of howling - which I have come to find out means she is looking for attention and security from me. She also 'screams' first thing in the morning, looking for her breakfast.
 
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catsareok

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Well, I think first of all it is important to know what her most recent bloodwork results were, to know more about her health up until this point. When was that last done? That will give us an idea of what might be going on. How long has everything you mentioned been going on?

Increased urination could be a sign of kidney failure which is very common in older cats esp if she is losing weight/dehydrated or on an all dry diet.
Also could be thyroid issues, if her appetite is strong but she is skinny.
Increased urination with increased drinking and being overweight could be diabetes.
How is her appetite?
Excessive meowing at night could be high blood pressure.
Is she urinating large amounts? Is it uncontrolled like she can't hold it in?

So many possibilities. Bloodwork and a vet check would definitely be a good idea to know what you are dealing with.
Hi Thank Jen she had all her bloodwork done about 6 months ago, the vet was surprised how all the test were, her kidneys,
were a little iffy, wanted me to get her on a wet food program for her kidneys, I tried she would not eat it, she drinks a good amount of water, been like this for a few years, she pees ok, actually slowing down a little, she has nice clean litter pans, (3) to be exact. has a nice poop everyday, I give her wet food she eats it pretty good, she only yells , howls when I am in another room, her hearing not so good, I call her, and I am right there, she does not seam to know where it is coming from, actually I did not see a pee this morning, then she went on a pad in the bedroom, hesitant about taking her to the vet right now, she hates it, to draw blood, they stick a needle in her neck OMG never heard her cry that lound, the vet pulled it right, got just enough blood, they said they howling and crying is her being senile and dementia ok thanks, I am keeping an eye on her..
 
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catsareok

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Hi. I agree with the others about a full geriatric check up with the vet. That means: full body check, complete blood panel (CBC, Chemistry Profile, thyroid) and at least a urinalysis. Rule out any chance of a health issue first and foremost. Based on her age, you might want to ask the vet about x-rays of her spine/legs to look for arthritis. After that, as long as she is eating/drinking/peeing/pooping OK, and seems to be enjoying life, deal with the rest for what it is.

An elderly cat can require special attention just like many elderly people do. Puppy pee pads, either on the floor, or in very low sided boxes is worth a shot to see if she might use those - there is a possibility at that age she has some arthritis and is not comfortable getting in and out of the litter boxes you have. And, getting rid of the urine smell in those areas she has gone will help to reduce the chance of her going in those places again and again. Even younger cats who have had accidents will continue to go outside their boxes if they can smell where they peed elsewhere. As far as the howling, while confusion may be part of it, I believe there is a 'feeling secure' issue behind it sometimes - love on her, pet her, cuddle her when she howls as much as you can. And, screaming in the AM, would suggest to me hunger. I don't know how you feed her, but at her age, you might want to consider leaving some food out for her overnight and see if that helps.

I also don't know what her sleep set up is, but it might help to give her a place near you at night, if she doesn't have one already. At her age - I would give her a food and water dish, as well as a litterbox nearby that area too - she's entitled to some 'spoiling'.

And, consider this: if she can find her food/water dishes, then her dementia may not be as bad as you think and it is very possible there are other reasons that she can't 'seem to find' her litterboxes.

Feeby is not nearly as old as your cat (15+ yo), but she does her own form of howling - which I have come to find out means she is looking for attention and security from me. She also 'screams' first thing in the morning, looking for her breakfast.
thanks feebys believe me she is spoiled big time, she has all of what you said, I see her snooping around for a pee spot, after she looks in all her litter pans 5 times, and does not go, I pick her up and put her in the pan and she goes most times, her legs are good she jumps up on the bed,
and my lap,. as I typing now she walked right by me, and went in the bedroom started screaming, I know I just have to deal with it, oh forgot I did get cbd oil for cats, gave it too her once, seamed about the same, I tried it too, felt a little funny for bit, haha
 

suh

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I only have experience with a senile dog. She lost her eyesight then her hindlegs became weak later on, but she was otherwise healthy, good energy, great appetite, loved to be held. We put her in a diaper, not sure if your cat can tolerate diaper on her, but that worked out really well for us. She slept in my arms every night so I know when she wants to get up to pee or just wander around so I could help her. Definitely understand how hard that can be on your sleep schedule, I spent two years doing that alone(then finally had help) but I feel like it's all worth it in the end.
 

KarenKat

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I totally understand how hard caring for an older cat can be - our boy Trin was always a little difficult. He yowled for years, I don’t think he was senile it felt more like a panic attack or anxiety. He was never great with the litter boxes, he would poop outside them, right on front. He also peed on clothes and other objects. Once he peed on the computer’s power strip.

After he got sick, he was having diarrhea The he still did outside the litterbox. It was awful, we ended up using the puppy pee pads to help cleanup easier. We were giving him daily medication which he fought tooth and nail against.

I would recommend a vet visit. No cat likes the vet, but you won’t know if there is something you can help her with if you don’t get more bloodwork done. It’s a short trip that might help a whole lot.
 
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