What breed is my white kitten?

insidior

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Hi guys!
New cat owner, I got this little 3 month old boy from the shelter not too long ago. The only description they had about the breed was ‘domestic medium hair’ and I’m not sure he’s even medium hair!
Blue eyes, white longish coat, toasted yellow-ish ears and striped tail of the similar yellow color. He has no other markings

last pic is his Kitten Vogue cover 😂
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jefferd18

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He is one gorgeous feline. I would say he has some flame point in his ancestry.
 

StefanZ

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He is a point! If he is red point or creme, Im not sure. Consider him as domestic as breed.
 

StefanZ

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Red point is called for flame point in cat fancy language.
 
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insidior

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He is a point! If he is red point or creme, Im not sure. Consider him as domestic as breed.
thank you! And by that you mean domestic long hair/medium hair point and not a siamese mix flame point?
 

lutece

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He's cute!

I would describe him as a red or cream point domestic longhair. In a kitten it can be difficult to distinguish between red point and cream point. His color will naturally darken a bit as he matures and you will get a better idea of his exact color.
 

StefanZ

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thank you! And by that you mean domestic long hair/medium hair point and not a siamese mix flame point?
Yes, that is what I mean. Of course, to call him for a siamese mix is OK in some situations. Most people dont know what a point is, but most do know what a siamese mix may be and look.
But the actual siamese ancetry may be many generations ago, but the point gene did wandered down the River of Life....
 

lucicat

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Oh he is a flame point!!! My fav color pattern.

But breed wise I'd agree with shelter that he is a domestic medium-long hair.

(The rescue I foster for distinguishes between medium and long haired, but honestly I can't really tell a difference.)
 

lutece

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(The rescue I foster for distinguishes between medium and long haired, but honestly I can't really tell a difference.)
Genetically, cats are either longhaired or shorthaired... there isn't really a distinct category for "medium hair." Both longhaired cats and shorthaired cats can vary in how much hair they have. Some people use the term "medium hair" to refer to longhaired cats that don't have as much of a full coat as other longhairs, but this is subjective, and I think it's a bit misleading. Often, a so-called "medium hair" will later develop a big fluffy coat when they are fully mature, or in the winter time.
 

lucicat

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Genetically, cats are either longhaired or shorthaired... there isn't really a distinct category for "medium hair." Both longhaired cats and shorthaired cats can vary in how much hair they have. Some people use the term "medium hair" to refer to longhaired cats that don't have as much of a full coat as other longhairs, but this is subjective, and I think it's a bit misleading. Often, a so-called "medium hair" will later develop a big fluffy coat when they are fully mature, or in the winter time.
Yes, this is what I have heard.
And I have found, as a foster working with kittens, it's really hard to tell exactly what their adult will look like. I can tell who is short haired and who is fluffly, but their kitten coat can be really different than their adult one. Or so I have been finding out from pictures of my former fosters as they grow! I had one who seemed to have a short haired coat, except that their was this halo of longer hairs. Like 75% of her coat seemed short, but then there was a much thinner layer that was long. She turned into a gorgeous long-haired kittty! It was so confusing to me when she was a kitten though!

And even with short haired cats their coats can be quite different. My two cats are both short haired, but one has the thinnest sleekest coat and the other is very plush and thick.
 

StefanZ

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Yes, this is what I have heard.
And I have found, as a foster working with kittens, it's really hard to tell exactly what their adult will look like. I can tell who is short haired and who is fluffly, but their kitten coat can be really different than their adult one. Or so I have been finding out from pictures of my former fosters as they grow! I had one who seemed to have a short haired coat, except that their was this halo of longer hairs. Like 75% of her coat seemed short, but then there was a much thinner layer that was long. She turned into a gorgeous long-haired kittty! It was so confusing to me when she was a kitten though!

And even with short haired cats their coats can be quite different. My two cats are both short haired, but one has the thinnest sleekest coat and the other is very plush and thick.
Yes. But sometimes there is a way to get behind the disguise: Shorthaired cats tends to be more lively than long haired cats. This is not ironclad, but there is some tendency in this.

Thus, a breeder whom breeds persians witnessed.

She had an by her association OKyed outcross persian and exotic; which are essentially the same cat, but the one is longhair, the other shorthair.

As it was an outcross, she could get both in the same litter. And registered the longhairs as persians, and shorthairs as exotic... (or sooner, it was called Persian (variation) and Exotic (variation), but this is extra course here).

But as newborns, there was no easy seen difference.
As you witness, its often difficult to see in kittens.

Now, she noticed, these kittens whom began to open eyes earlier, early crawle better, etc - were almost always the future exotics...
While the late bloomers were almost always the future persians to be...
 
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