Recipes - Soups, Stews, And Sauces

Kat0121

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Love Hungarian goulash. I use a cup of red wine in the mix with some tomato paste and a mixture of sweet and smoked paprika (Penzey) to coat the meat prior to browning. I have turned to braising in the oven when I'm home and have time. I think the meat is more tender with braising.

Our quick goulash is made with ground beef and pasta. It's an old standby around here.
Is that what they call American goulash?

American Goulash - Recipe - Cooks.com

Look at what I found on Amazon. The best of all worlds.

www.amazon.com/Chiquilin-Mild-Smoked-Spanish-Paprika/dp/B00S5AD96E/ref=sr_1_10_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1545024232&sr=8-10&keywords=paprika&th=1
 
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Winchester

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Yep, that's American goulash. And it's quite tasty, too. I usually put it all together and then bake it in the oven. Leftovers are yummy.

Once you've tried smoked paprika, you'll wonder how you ever got by without it. A lot of times, when I'm using paprika, I'll use half Hungarian Sweet and half smoked. I also have Sharp Paprika, also from Penzey. But most often it's the sweet and smoked. Yum
 

doomsdave

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I'm foaming at the mouth, and I've just eaten a big bowl of gumbo and rice.

Gonna have to get back in the kitchen and experiment some more.

GHOULASH X . . . . .
 

doomsdave

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Mexican Mother-in-Law stew

I got this from a friend in the palm society, who's an Anglo Gringo who lives in TJ with his Mexican wife, and her mother, who's from Jalisco state. This is different from most of the food we here in El Norte think of as Mexican food. It has a "dark" subtle taste, as opposed to the "brighter" bolder flavors of "typical" Mexican food. I like to serve this at potlucks because it lends itself to various presentations, as noted below, and keeps well.

INGREDIENTS

3 pounds of pork stew meat, tough stuff removed, cut into 1" cubes
1 - 2 pounds of Chile poblano, aka Chile pasilla (those big, giant vinyl-covered-looking chiles in Mexican markets) (pictured below)
1 large onion, white or red are best, or you can also use about a pound of those "fat bottomed" Mexican green onions (not to be confused with gringo scallions)
powdered black pepper
powdered clove
powdered cumin
salt to taste


PROCEDURE

If you can, use a cast iron pot or big skillet, and brown the pork till it's nice and brown; do it in batches if you have to, removing batches from pan to brown the next batch.

Roast the chiles on an open flame (I do it on the stove burners) till each side is a bit blackened and blistered, at which point you put them in a plastic bag or similar container to steam. After they've steamed a bit (they get limp) remove the charred skin in some water. If you like heat, pull out the stems and chop up the whole thing, seeds and all; if you don't like heat, remove as many of the seeds and their attachment stems as you can.

Fire up your blender or food processor and cut up the onion, the charred/chopped chiles and place in it and grind it into this green glop, adding as much water as you have to in order to get it to grind.

Add salt to the green glop

Add spices to the green glop: NOTE OF CAUTION: the combo of peppers and spices amplify each other a bit, especially black pepper powder. Use maybe half a teaspoon of each, and you can add more another time if you want to.

Put the browned pork and green glop from the blender into the skillet and cook until the excess liquid is gone and you have dark green chunks of meat. This takes a while, but it's worth it, because it tenderizes the meat and causes any excess connective tissue to dissolve.

Great with rice or plain boiled potatoes or flat bread.

Or . . . you can also impale the chunks of meat with those fancy-toothpick thingies and serve them as appetizers.

Will freeze and refrigerate well.

NOTES

You can sub beef or veal for the pork, though I think pork is still best.

You can add garlic to the green-glop-to-be in the blender to taste.

You can also add a jalapeno or serrano chile (not many) if you want a bit more heat.

 

LTS3

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To make this vegetarian, substitute vegetable broth for the chicken broth.


Italian Bean and Vegetable Soup

Note: This recipe makes a lot, so you can eat it for lunch all week long, or freeze half for later. If you prefer, you can halve the recipe for a smaller amount.

Yield: 8-10 servings


Ingredients
  • 2 (15-ounce) cans canellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4-5 stalks celery, diced
  • 4-5 medium carrots, diced
  • 3 small zucchini, diced
  • 3 teaspoons Italian seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 8 cups chicken broth
  • 2 (14.5-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
  • 3-4 cups (or one 5 oz. bag) baby spinach leaves, stems trimmed
  • Freshly grated Parmesan, optional
Instructions
Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, carrots, celery, zucchini, Italian seasoning, salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Add the broth, tomatoes (including the juice), and beans. Then add the spinach leaves and simmer until the spinach is wilted. Serve with freshly grated Parmesan or crusty bread.
 

betsygee

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Have you made this one, LTS3 LTS3 ? Looks good!

ETA: A friend sent me this recipe and I made it a couple of days ago. It's delicious. I made the mistake, though, of making it earlier in the day and letting it sit, and the orzo got a little soggy. The recipe goes together really fast so next time I'll make it right before I want to serve it.
 

LTS3

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Easy enough for a weeknight meal 🍲


Serves 6 to 8 , Makes 12 cups
Prep time 15 minutes
Cook time 25 minutes

Ingredients
  • 1 large yellow onion
  • 1 large or 2 small fennel bulbs
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 (32-ounce) cartons low-sodium chicken broth (8 cups)
  • 3 cups cooked and diced chicken (from about 1 rotisserie chicken)
  • 3/4 cup dried orzo pasta
  • 1/2 head escarole
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice (from 1/2 lemon), plus more as needed
Instructions
  1. Prepare the following, adding each to the same medium bowl as you complete it: Finely chop 1 large yellow onion. Cut off any stems and fronds from 1 large or 2 small fennel bulbs. Cut in half, remove any wilted or rubbery outer leaves, then finely chop. Mince 2 garlic cloves.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large pot over medium heat until shimmering. Add the onion mixture, season with 1 teaspoon kosher salt and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is translucent and the vegetables have reduced in volume by about a third, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Add 2 cartons low-sodium chicken broth. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Meanwhile, dice the meat from 1 rotisserie chicken to get 3 cups if needed.
  4. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices, and 3/4 cup dried orzo to the pot. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the orzo is tender, about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, coarsely chop 1/2 head escarole (about 4 lightly packed cups).
  5. Add the escarole and 1 tablespoon lemon juice to the soup and stir to combine. Simmer until escarole is softened, about 2 minutes. Taste and season with more kosher salt and/or lemon juice as needed.
Recipe Notes
Substitutions: Greens such as swiss chard, kale, or spinach can be substituted for the escarole.
Storage: Refrigerate soup in airtight containers for up to 4 days. If you prefer, you can cook the orzo in a separate pot, adding the cooked pasta when serving to prevent it from soaking too much broth during storage.

Other: The real bonus of a rotisserie chicken is the collected juice at the bottom of the plastic domed container — don’t throw them out! Those juices add huge flavor to a quick weeknight soup. Pour it into the pot to bump up the depth of flavor with little effort on your part. If you’ve refrigerated your rotisserie chicken, those juices may have solidified into gelatin. You can just use a butter knife to coax it out of the crevices of the container and into your soup
 

LTS3

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Chicken soup

Serves 6

4pounds chicken parts (thighs, drumsticks, wings, breasts) or chicken bones
1stalk celery, thinly sliced
1large onion, cut into 1-inch dice
4medium carrots, cut into 4-inch lengths
1medium rutabaga, cut into 1-inch dice
3quarts cold water
1 bay leaf
3whole peppercorns
1tablespoon salt
4sprigs fresh parsley, stems tied together, leaves chopped

1. If any of the chicken pieces have backbone attached, use your fingers to remove and discard any liver-like pieces that adhere to the inside of the backbone.

2. In a soup pot, combine the chicken, celery, onion, carrots, and rutabaga. Add the cold water and bring to a boil.

3. Skim the surface of the water thoroughly. Turn down the heat and add the bay leaf, peppercorns, salt, and parsley stems. Simmer the chicken for 1 hour, skimming the surface thoroughly every 15 minutes. The water should barely bubble. The soup is done when the meat pulls away from the bones. Simmer 15 minutes longer, if necessary.

4. Use a large slotted spoon to remove the vegetables from the broth and transfer them to a large container. Transfer the chicken to a bowl. Strain the broth into another large container. Let everything cool. Shred the chicken, discarding the skin and bones. Add the meat to the container of vegetables. Cover and refrigerate both containers overnight.

5. With a slotted spoon, skim off and discard the solidified fat on the top of the broth.

6. Tip the broth, chicken, and vegetables into a soup pot. Bring to a boil. Lower the heat and let the soup barely simmer for 5 minutes. Ladle into bowls with noodles, rice, or matzo balls, if you like. Sprinkle with chopped parsley.
 

betsygee

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My stepson and DIL have a two month old newborn, who was a preemie, and they don't have a lot of time to cook right now! I wanted to make them some easy dinners, and they have to be with no tomatoes or peppers, since DIL is allergic. I made them some broccoli cheese soup, a vegan Irish stew, and this turkey stew. The turkey stew won the taste test! They said they enjoyed them all but the turkey stew was their favorite.
 
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