Question of The Day. Saturday 23rd of January.

Norachan

Moderator
Thread starter
Staff Member
Moderator
Joined
May 27, 2013
Messages
25,645
Purraise
23,062
Location
Mount Fuji, Japan
Hello. ❄

We're snowed in today. ☃ We have about 15 cm so far and it's still coming down.

Do you drive in the snow? Do you feel confident about it? How do you get around on snowy days if you don't drive?

I don't drive, so I've never driven in the snow. I get the feeling I wouldn't like it very much. If I have to go out I have big hiking boots, chain spikes to stop me slipping in the snow and plenty of thick, warm clothing. The bus that serves the village I live nearest to has chains around the tires at this time of year, but a few times the bus has got stuck on a particularly slippery part of the road and had to turn back. I've had to trudge home from a bus stop much lower down than my usual stop a few times before.

How do you get around in the snow?
❄

And for those of you that live in Florida, how many ice cubes do you take in your daiquiri?


🍸
 

DreamerRose

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Dec 11, 2015
Messages
7,748
Purraise
8,138
Location
Naperville, IL
I got used to driving in snow a long time ago. It's a matter of braking slowly, and braking before you make a turn, not during. I found snow packed roads were very easy to drive on, but around here, the snowplows come out right away, so there's no snowpack.

I don't walk on snow now because it's too risky for a fall. I have used Yak Trax though to get to the mail box.

1611464414975.png
 

Willowy

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Mar 1, 2009
Messages
29,485
Purraise
24,190
Location
South Dakota
Yes, I drive in it or I'd never go anywhere during the winter ;). Snow isn't terrible; ice is THE WORST. I feel reasonably confident that I can drive in it but there's always the chance of a semi falling on you or some other yahoo sliding through a stop sign so it does make me a little nervous.
 

Maria Bayote

Mama of 5 Cats, 4 Dogs , 2 Budgies & 2 Humans
Top Cat
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Messages
2,874
Purraise
7,499
I'd give anything just to even see the snow again! :D

I don't drive anymore, not because I don't want to, but my vision is not so good anymore especially now. However, I used to ride around with my bike in the snowy streets of Tokyo years ago when I was living there. I love the sight of snow on the ground, and the feel of the cold as it gets to my skin. It reminds me of the clouds and the tranquility of it.
 

gilmargl

TCS Member
Super Cat
Joined
Feb 12, 2013
Messages
1,048
Purraise
2,009
Location
Germany, NRW
I prefer driving in snow to driving on ice, in fog or at night. When it snows there is less traffic on the road and I drive slowly and try to ignore the idiots who want to overtake! We don't have much snow but this morning snow has prevented me from going out with my daughter and her husband! There is a man-made hill nearby, now well overgrown, and we had planned to go walking. Unfortunately my showboots are very old and I haven't worn them for years. I have visions of the soles coming unattached as soon as I am a few miles from home. I haven't tested my other shoes/boots in snow and am worried about slipping and sliding. So, I'm staying at home. Rather disappointed. :disappointed:
 

denice

Advisor
Staff Member
Advisor
Joined
Feb 7, 2006
Messages
16,128
Purraise
9,411
Location
Columbus OH
I drive in snow but I don't like it especially on the freeway. Unfortunately in Columbus pretty much have to use the outer belt to get anywhere, if it's a heavy snow the side streets aren't cleaned off right away so the outer belt is a necessity. I won't drive on glare ice. I have heard people say that they know how to drive on glare ice but I don't believe them.
 

Margret

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Jul 17, 2014
Messages
6,152
Purraise
7,977
Location
Littleton, CO
I grew up in the Denver, Colorado area. Denver is called "the mile high city" for good reason, so I've been driving in snow since I was a teen-ager.

There are certain basic rules that can make driving in snow much easier.
  • Have good winter tires on your vehicle.
  • Don't drive too fast for the conditions.
  • When possible, avoid coming to a full stop at stop signs; just go very slowly. The police tend to recognize this as being a response to road conditions and are unlikely to give you a ticket for it, on condition that you do it safely.
  • Leave greater following distance than usual.
  • If your brakes have an anti-lock feature, use it! If they don't you can get a similar effect by pumping the brakes. This lets you steer between pumps so you're less likely to skid.
  • Four wheel drive can be wonderful for getting you out of a snow drift, but it won't keep you from skidding into the snow drift in the first place. Never assume that your vehicle is less likely to skid because you have four wheel drive.
  • Carry some ice melting "salt" with you in the winter. It can be the difference between getting stuck and getting home. (Note: I'm not talking about sodium chloride. I'm talking about the stuff they sell specifically for this purpose.)
  • Try to stay on major roads, which are more likely to be clear.
  • Always assume all the other drivers on the road are from Florida and know more about making daiquiris than about driving in snow.
  • Make sure you have plenty of windshield washer fluid.
  • If you're driving at night, clean your headlights frequently.
  • Know your limits! We were driving to California one winter when a blizzard blew in on Donner Pass. We spotted a motel with a "Vacancy" sign and a pizza parlor next door, got a room, got a pizza to take out, and ate it in bed. And that's the correct way to handle Donner Pass in a blizzard!
Margret
 
Last edited:

verna davies

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
21,641
Purraise
12,895
Location
Wales uk
Luckily it rarely snows where I live BUT it snowed last night, not much, about 2cms and it's thawing already. I don't drive in the snow or ice, I don't have the confidence and there are too many idiot drivers around that don't take the conditions into consideration. As I am retired, I don't need to drive in it fortunately
 

NY cat man

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Aug 6, 2018
Messages
5,502
Purraise
13,566
Since where I live can get snow anywhere from October until May, driving in it is no big deal. Good tires are a must, as well as a different driving technique, plus being extra alert for the inevitable idiots who think that the laws of physics don't apply to them. More times than I can recall, I have driven through a foot or more of snow without incident. For walking, I have good insulated boots with lug soles for traction, plus they have provision for screw-in carbide studs.
 

rubysmama

Forum Helper
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Nov 25, 2013
Messages
17,955
Purraise
38,948
Location
Canada
I used to drive in snow when I was younger, but too many scary close calls put the fear in me, and now I won't take the car out when the streets are snow covered. And since I'm retired, that's easy to do.
 

posiepurrs

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Jan 11, 2015
Messages
2,212
Purraise
4,481
Location
Western Massachusetts, USA
I grew up in the Denver, Colorado area. Denver is called "the mile high city" for good reason, so I've been driving in snow since I was a teen-ager.

There are certain basic rules that can make driving in snow much easier.
  • Have good winter tires on your vehicle.
  • Don't drive too fast for the conditions.
  • When possible, avoid coming to a full stop at stop signs; just go very slowly. The police tend to recognize this as being a response to road conditions and are unlikely to give you a ticket for it, on condition that you do it safely.
  • Leave greater following distance than usual.
  • If your brakes have an anti-lock feature, use it! If they don't you can get a similar effect by pumping the brakes. This lets you steer between pumps so you're less likely to skid.
  • Four wheel drive can be wonderful for getting you out of a snow drift, but it won't keep you from skidding into the snow drift in the first place. Never assume that your vehicle is less likely to skid because you have four wheel drive.
  • Carry some ice melting "salt" with you in the winter. It can be the difference between getting stuck and getting home. (Note: I'm not talking about sodium chloride. I'm talking about the stuff they sell specifically for this purpose.)
  • Try to stay on major roads, which are more likely to be clear.
  • Always assume all the other drivers on the road are from Florida and know more about making daiquiris than about driving in snow.
  • Make sure you have plenty of windshield washer fluid.
  • If you're driving at night, clean your headlights frequently.
  • Know your limits! We were driving to California one winter when a blizzard blew in on Donner Pass. We spotted a motel with a "Vacancy" sign and a pizza parlor next door, got a room, got a pizza to take out, and ate it in bed. And that's the correct way to handle Donner Pass in a blizzard!
Margret
This should be required reading for every driver who lives north of Florida!! I grew up in Florida, live in New England.(for over 30 years) and I STILL hate driving in the snow. I will NOT drive if there is a chance of ice. Since I am retired, I just stay home of there is a chance of snow. When I was working, there were many days I had to get to work in bad conditions and there were some close calls. Now when it snows, the most dangerous thing I do is walk to the mailbox or bird feeder.
 

muffy

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Aug 9, 2014
Messages
4,844
Purraise
8,267
Location
Fredericksburg, VA
I don't drive any more but I did not mind driving in the snow. It was ice that scared me. I have not had to drive in the snow or ice since I retired ten years ago. I did not have to go out so I didn't.
 

EmersonandEvie

Mom to Evie, Emerson and Dexter
Top Cat
Joined
Jul 25, 2017
Messages
1,653
Purraise
2,677
Location
Middle Georgia
I've never had to drive in snow. I've seen snow, but I lived on campus and didn't have to go anywhere (worked and lived on campus). It "snowed" here one year- people lost their minds, schools were cancelled, the state jobs shut down. There was maybe 1/4 inch that was gone by lunch :lol: :lol: :lol:

That being said- B just applied to a job that would put us in the mountains of western North Carolina (our dream, really). I really hope he gets it, for a number of reasons. If he does, we will both have to learn how to drive in snow really quickly!
 

Winchester

In the kitchen with my cookies
Veteran
Joined
Aug 28, 2009
Messages
26,693
Purraise
16,485
Location
In the kitchen
For the most part, in Pennsylvania, if you want to go anywhere during the winter, you drive in the snow. I remember having to go down to Albright College in Reading, PA to pick up our son for holiday break, about a two-hour drive one way. About halfway there, it started to snow and sleet and there was even freezing rain. The route we take is very mountainous. My mother went along with me, so I didn't have to go down alone. On the way back, Mom told me right out that, if I was going to drive though the mountains, she was getting out of the car. We ended up having to take the main drag home, which was a nightmare. We got caught in afternoon work traffic and the engine started to overheat because of the sleet on the front of the car. I said, "Put the windows down and I'm turning the heat on full-tilt!" And that got us through until we could get moving again. We got home and, that time? I wanted to kiss the ground, I was so thankful. Mom told Dad, "Don't ever let this girl tell you she can't drive in snow! She can!"

So while I can drive in snow and ice, I prefer not to do so, if I can help it. Often, it wasn't my driving I was worried about; it was the other people. The ones who drive 25 mph on a 55 mph road and then can't get up the hill, which means that everybody behind them can't either. Or the ones who drive like a bat out of Hades because "I have four-wheel drive!" which doesn't do much on ice.
 

maggiedemi

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Mar 26, 2017
Messages
13,868
Purraise
31,930
now I won't take the car out when the streets are snow covered. And since I'm retired, that's easy to do.
I didn't know you were retired. I thought you were younger than me for some reason. Lucky! I wish I could retire, but I'm probably gonna have to look for work soon. Wish I could just be a housewife and cat mom.

I'm never confident driving in it, but we have no choice living way out here in the boonies, 30 minutes from town. I'm not working right now, but for years I had to drive in this weather.
 
Top