Moldy Corn - Letter to the FDA

FeebysOwner

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"Aflatoxin is one of the most dangerous threats to our pets, simply because corn is such a common ingredient – and the mold is basically indestructible. Immediate, consistent, and transparent action needs to be taken by the FDA. Pets are dying, and voluntary recalls are not enough."

Pet owners are asking FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine to fully investigate the recent dramatic increase of aflatoxin contaminated pet food. If you are interested, click on the link below to add your name to the FDA letter.
Pet Owners Will Send An Important Request to FDA About Dangerous Corn Ingredients – Truth about Pet Food

(Courtesy: Kflowers)
 

Tobermory

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I’m really grateful to my vet for warning me about aflatoxin and corn-based litters a few years ago.
 

Kflowers

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I think it maybe time to consider all corn based litters regardless of where they are produced. Damp and wet increase the growth of Aflatoxin, which makes corn a strange choice for litter. The key thing at this point is stay alert, don't just go by where the corn was grown. My guess is that the corn for litter is not as strictly inspected as that for human foods. I also don't believe there are any regulations for the production of litter. If anyone can find a listing of such regulations, please post them.

Corn Belt in Midwest could see aflatoxin on crops soon


I did find this article about how litter is made, which is interesting.
 

lisahe

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Corn kitty litter seems a bit problematic from some other health angles, too. Dr. Pierson seems a little skeptical of corn (as well as wheat) kitty litter, noting allergies on catinfo.org and writing, "We see more feline asthma with the corn and wheat litters when compared to the clay litters."

I have heard of some asthmatic cats apparently improving with wheat kitty litter but given our asthmatic cat's allergies, I wouldn't want to to try it.
 

Kflowers

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We did use wheat litter when our elderly cat didn't walk far enough form the litter box to her bed/other cushions to walk the litter off her feet and she was eating the clay when she washed. The vet said it was better for her to eat the wheat than the clay. BUT that litter was all wheat and nothing else. I'm not sure current 'wheat' litters are that limited ingredient. The only other time we used wheat litter was the first two weeks a kitten (orphaned at 5 weeks) was learning about litter. Her feet were still sensitive to the sharpness of clay litter.

Wheat litter does get damp and stay that way. Wheat litter that clumps, probably contains an ingredient other than wheat. To make wheat litter work well for specific needs, as above, use very little litter, no more than an inch deep, and change it completely every 2-3 days.
 
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