Can anybody identify these spots

trudy1

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They just appeared in that thin hair area in front of her ears. First just a few now seem to be increasing. She doesn’t offer to scratch or excessively rub the areas. Just curious as to what they might be. They are not crusty or raised.she is inside cat only.

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catheetiem

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Hmm, reminds me of fleabites (not actual bites from fleas, they're just called that) on horses. Gray horses get them as they get older (here's a picture of them)

I have absolutely no idea if a similar thing can happen in cats. Although, notably, the skin itself does not change color on the fleabites on horses, its just the hair. So probably not at all related, but that's what jumped to my mind first! Maybe some sort of age spot or freckles? Do cats get those lol
 

FeebysOwner

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Hi. How old is your kitty? Feeby (15+ yo), who is dark gray, has similar spots, but they are mostly on her ears. (I will have to take a look in front of her ears, since she also has some balding there, like your cat does). In Feeby's case, I believe them to be 'age spots'. They are discoloration in the pigment and the vet has never said they were anything to worry about.

However, the fact that they are increasing in number on your cat would suggest at a minimum that you send an email with pics of them to your vet (if they will accept them, most do) and explain that this is recent and seems to be spreading. Check her ears as well.
 

Caspers Human

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The areas behind a cat's eyes along the top/side of the head is normally sparsely furred. That's not a problem.
That area is where the cat's temporal scent gland is located. The temporal gland is one of several parts of the body that a cat will rub on people or objects in order to scent mark its territory or to indicate familiarity.

i.e. When a cat rubs its temporal gland on you, it is saying, "You're part of my clan."

So, you can see why that area won't have a lot of fur. It would be harder for a cat to use it's scent gland if there was a lot of fur in that area.

I also see some small spots right in the area where the temporal gland would be located. They sort of look like acne or something like that. Don't they? Are they raised bumps or just discolored spots?

If it's just a discoloration and the cat doesn't seem to be bothered by them, I would just keep an eye on them to be sure they don't become inflamed or anything like that but, otherwise, I would leave the well enough alone.

If you like, you can take a clean cloth and warm water and wipe those areas, once every day or two, in order to be sure that the cat isn't getting into anything that's causing a problem.

If they are bumpy, my first guess would be that there is some sort of problem in the glands or the surrounding tissue because of a buildup of sebum (body oil) in those areas. This is common in some cats, especially on the chin or lower jaw. It is, pretty much, the same thing as acne that humans get.

The treatment for feline acne is virtually the same as human acne: Keep the areas in question scrupulously clean, remove any sources of dirt or things that could cause irritation and, if the problem persists or gets worse, visit your doctor. :)

If this is true, the first order of business would be to clean those areas. You can use a cloth and warm water but many pet stores sell special "wet wipes" for cats. They are just like the wet wipes that we buy at the grocery or pharmacy for use on babies only they are specially formulated for cats. (Don't use wet wipes made for humans on cats! The alcohol or other ingredients in human wet wipes probably aren't good for cats.)

We keep a package of "kitty wipes" on hand for Casper. He's an all-white cat so, when he gets eye boogers, his eyes look unsightly and we can tell that he feels uncomfortable when he gets them. We use the wet wipes to clean around his eyes and other things like that.
You should probably just have some on hand in case your cat needs a quick cleanup. ;)

Just for reference, un-neutered, male cats produce more sebum and/or glandular secretions than neutered cats. That means that the areas on or around their scent gland can get dirtier, faster and would likely require more frequent cleaning than a neutered cat. An intact cat would, likely, experience acne or inflammation in the areas around it's glands more easily than a neutered one. However since you have a she-cat, I think this concern can go at the bottom of the list.

My second guess is that your cat might be rubbing on something that is causing irritation or an allergic reaction. Since cats rub that area of their heads on people and objects, if your cat has been rubbing against something that doesn't agree with her, that might be the cause. If she goes outdoors, it might be a plant or something that doesn't agree with her. If she's an all-indoor cat, it could be some piece of furniture, a potted plant or some bedding or clothing that she's rubbing against.

I don't know for sure. It's hard to tell from just pictures.

Like I said, if they aren't bothering the cat, just keep an eye out and don't worry.
If they are bumpy or inflamed, look for things that your cat might be rubbing against which could cause a skin reaction.

Cleaning the areas in question certainly wouldn't hurt.

If your cat becomes bothered by them, if they become inflamed, get bumpy or start oozing call the vet right away.

would suggest at a minimum that you send an email with pics of them to your vet (if they will accept them, most do) and explain that this is recent and seems to be spreading.
That's a capital idea! :)

Telemedicine for cats! ;) ;) ;)
 
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stephanietx

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This happens to my cat when she overgrooms or slides along the carpet trying to rub her ears because they were itchy. Either it was seasonal allergies or she had an ear infection. I put a little bit of Neosporin on the spots and gave her an antihistamine and it went away.
 

Caspers Human

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Yes, it could have been an infection. It could have been mites or just dirty ears. Maybe, it could have been just because she thought rubbing her head on the carpet was fun. ;)

Yes, Neosporin (or generic "triple antibiotic ointment") is okay to use on cats as long as you use the smallest amount necessary to cover the area.

Cats often lick off the ointment when they clean themselves and end up swallowing the stuff. Small amounts of ointment aren't harmful to your cat if ingested but, if your cat is allergic to any of the ingredients or if your cat swallows too much, she can get sick. If you only apply the smallest amount necessary, you won't have to worry. If you apply it to an area where she can't lick, such as the top of the head, you'll be doubly safe.

Your vet can tell you more about which antibiotic ointment to use or not to use, how to apply it and what to watch out for in case of problems.

Also, antihistamines such as Benadryl are okay to give to cats as long as you are careful about the dosage and watch for adverse reactions or allergy symptoms.

I won't tell you how much Benadryl to give your cat because I want you to call your vet and ask first.
I know how much Benadryl to give *MY* cat because I talked to my vet and found out. I know what reasons to give Benadryl for and what reasons NOT to give it for because I talked to my vet and found out. I also know what problems to watch out for if I do give it to my cat because I asked my vet and she told me.

Yes, Neosporin and Benadryl are okay for cats but DO call your vet, first. It should only be a ten minute phone call, if that.
 

DreamerRose

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Mingo has had a spot or two just like that for years. I keep and eye on it to make sure it isn't growing, but it hasn't so far. He's seven now and has had them since he was about a year old. I think it's just a discoloration, like a freckle. The vet has never said anything about them.
 
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