Black Cat Or Tabby In Disguise?

di and bob

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It's not unusual at all to see the tabby markings in most breeds and all colors because ALL domestic cats carry the tabby gene. It goes back to the ancient Egyptian days and is almost always accompanied by the 'M' on their foreheads. The M stands for mother goddess, the Virgin Mary, and many other long-forgotten reasons! Remember, cats were worshipped during ancient times, I'm sure they would LOVE to return to those times, I think they have been trying to revert us since!
 

StefanZ

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So I read that the color Black is a dominant allele and Tabby is a dominant pattern, so sometimes you can have the dominant Black but not a totally recessive Tabby.

I think Luna is like this maybe. Sometimes in the right light you can see brownish stripes, but otherwise she looks totally black. So is she a Tabby in disguise?

I also read that black cats are related to Siamese cats. Is that true? I forget how the story went, but somehow the color black was related to Siamese. Any truth to that?
Old tread, and I notice there are several undigested ideas running here...

Tabby is more dominant than black. so if a cat has a tabby gene, the cat will show up as a tabby, no mistake about it. He will probably be a so called brown tabby.

The only exception is white, as the white gene is even stronger, even more dominant than tabby, and thus, it may happen the white covers for example, a tabby pattern.

As mentioned earlier, its quite common solid colored cats have ghost tabby markings, without them being real tabbies.
Breeders of purebred cats with solid colors try to eliminate this trait, but its commonly seen in moggies.

Again, the only exception are solid white cats...

Nay, black isnt really related to siameses nor other pointed cats (black is called for seal in pointed cats). The connection is, seal points tend to blacken up as adults...

The siamese gene is recessive, and it needs to come from momma and daddy, to be visible in the individual. But once doubled, the result is quite striking! So the cat becomes a point, and also carries the colors momma and daddy had. Be it black, red, grey - may also be tabby...
 

badolinsky

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Old tread, and I notice there are several undigested ideas running here...

Tabby is more dominant than black. so if a cat has a tabby gene, the cat will show up as a tabby, no mistake about it. He will probably be a so called brown tabby.

The only exception is white, as the white gene is even stronger, even more dominant than tabby, and thus, it may happen the white covers for example, a tabby pattern.

As mentioned earlier, its quite common solid colored cats have ghost tabby markings, without them being real tabbies.
Breeders of purebred cats with solid colors try to eliminate this trait, but its commonly seen in moggies.

Again, the only exception are solid white cats...

Nay, black isnt really related to siameses nor other pointed cats (black is called for seal in pointed cats). The connection is, seal points tend to blacken up as adults...

The siamese gene is recessive, and it needs to come from momma and daddy, to be visible in the individual. But once doubled, the result is quite striking! So the cat becomes a point, and also carries the colors momma and daddy had. Be it black, red, grey - may also be tabby...

Wow! Thanks for all of the information! I love learning more about our cats.
 
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