What to do next? Cat introduction question

honeychurro

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So it's been about a week since I brought a new kitten.
My resident cat is 9 years old, used to live with dogs most of her lives.

Anyhow, during week 1 of cat introduction, I've separated the new kitten for almost 3 days. Then, I let them see each other while focusing more on scent swapping. I tried to make a group scent by using Honey (resident cat)'s brush.. which she first hissed at. But now, she's fine with. Then for the past 2-3 days, I've noticed that she wanted to go into my bedroom where the new kitten is.

I decided to let her explore while having the new kitten in the cat condo. During the encounter, most of the time, Honey kept her distance and went up to her cat tree and "watched" from top of the cat tree. I gave her treat, which she took. And since then, I've allowed her to explore new kitten's room, while I used the opportunity to let the new kitten explore my living room (which is going well - she was nervous first but now plays, runs, and even eat's Honey's food and water)

Now my question is .... do I just continue doing this until Honey feels safe to come near where the kitten is and take my treat??? I've noticed that if she is little bit closer to the kitten and I try to give her treat, she would not take it. (She did hiss few times through the door if the kitten is nearby the door or through the cage when she felt the kitten is too close to her)

I also heard that if cat goes up to cat tree and stares the kitten, it means that she is not liking the cat. Is this true?
 

vince

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An eye to eye stare is more of a generalized aggressive stance, but not necessarily an indication of dislike. Mine do it when they want to initiate play, too.

I think your introduction is going okay. If you want, you might try regular feeding on opposite sides of the door. Adjust the distance according to the apparent stress levels of the cat. You can keep up the scent-swapping too.
 
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