Took in another stray but she's positive for FCoV antibodies

silent meowlook

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There is still so much not known about FIP. There is thoughts that the coronavirus only mutates to FIP in cats that have a certain DNA. But, that has not been proven.
Is that all the blood work results you have? Elevated Globulin can lead one to think an FIP diagnosis. What did your vet advise? Was worms diagnosed and if so, what kind? Are there any symptoms?

If this was my cat, I would consider an internal medicine specialist to get this sorted out. If that wasn’t feasible, if I was in your situation, for now I would keep them separated and retest in a month if all is going well.
I have linked another study and more information to contribute to the information overload you have right now. Sorry.
https://malque.pub/ojs/index.php/avr/article/download/261/217/1341
 
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noani

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Thank you, I think we are leaning towards isolate for now and retest.

The vet doesn't suspect FIP at all, I misunderstood initially due to the test name being a bit misleading and not understanding Italian perfectly when on the phone.

there are two more images the veg sent me with the results. She said all is fine and she only has FCoV,no reason to suspect FIP or anything really.
The problem is I don't know if mine are positive for FCoV and I'm unsure about the best course of action if they are not.

Edit to say, yes she has worms (if I remember correctly tapeworm) and earmites (obviously both are being treated).
IMG-20231128-WA0010.jpg
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IMG-20231128-WA0011.jpg
 

silent meowlook

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The thing I am concerned about is the test that shows 15* I don’t know what that is and can’t get translate to work with the photo.
 
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noani

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As far as I understand alpha 1 would be the glycoprotein that if elevated can mean different diseases could be suspected among which fip, but hers is low. Alpha2 agonists seem to be given for sedation etc - her blood was taken when she was under anesthesia already for the spay surgery. I'll ask the vet though :) she did tell me all her values are great so we are not worried about her at all at this stage.

We are worried about the other two, and potentially exposing them to undue risk if she stays with us, if they are fcov negative. So I am more concerned about the implications of the fcov positive result and what to do next - if it makes sense to separate and retest her for fcov in a few months to see if she gets negative and can be introduced without being a risk for the other two. I am not sure yet if fecal or blood testing is the best way to go to assess her risk to the others.

We should get the other two's results tomorrow to see if they are positive or negative for fcov.
 
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di and bob

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From what I have heard, FIP is transmitted through saliva etc. and is a virus. While MANY cats have the virus, few go on to actually develop teh disease. It must mutate first. There are MANY cases of cats living together with no problems when one has FIP. I would do a lot more research before giving up on her......PS, my cats are in year four after being diagnosed with FeLV, leukemia. One only had 'days' to live and is still with us. don't give up!
 
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noani

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Mine are negative.
I'm now thinking if it's worth keeping her with my boyfriend for a while and see if she gets negative or doesn't shed - I don't know what the chances of either are - or just try to find her a forever home right away. One lady has messaged me who is interested in adopting her so she would probably be up for taking her - she knows about all of this already but doesn't have other cats. Then she doesn't have to keep changing homes, and if she doesn't get negative what will be our alternative? Him getting more attached then letting her go? Not being able to find a home potentially?
 
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noani

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Yes. I've been crying on and off all morning, but besides my selfish wish to keep her, it's for no one's good to hold on and try to solve something that may not be solvable.
 

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If a kitten tests positive, a fecal FCoV RT-PCR test should be performed monthly over the course of many months to see if they continue to test positive. If they would test negative repeatedly, they can be considered a non-shedder which reduces the odds of transmission to another cat - but, that does not change the fact that the kitten has FCoV. Which, as far as I know means that, technically, they could resume shedding at some point and time in the future.

Given all that, you are probably best to let the kitten be adopted so they can start their forever home life. So sorry.

I think that is why you heard from some FB folks that it is 'no big deal' as cats who are around non-shedders are typically considered 'safe', as I am guessing many cats don't shed intermittently throughout their lives.
 
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noani

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Plot twist - they don't want her anymore. So we are back to zero candidates.

I've read studies of treating cats with the experimental antiviral drugs for 7-10 days when they are fcov positive but before they could ever develop fip - like a preventative measure. A lady who contacted me in one of the groups has told me some stuff how it works etc.

I've got a doctor friend (human doc, but he understands these studies and numbers and sciency stuff better than me) on it now to help me understand if it makes sense to try it. it seems we'd be looking at a few hundred euro at least, but the research seems promising. As far as I understand, this treatment has led to cats becoming negative within a short time, both as far as antibodies and shedding goes. I'll look into this more...
 
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noani

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Here is one article related to what you are talking about (see link below). I guess I would be curious to know if studies have existed long enough to show that re-treatment isn't required at some point in time down the road for these cats.
Stopping Feline Coronavirus Shedding Prevented Feline Infectious Peritonitis - PMC (nih.gov)
Yep that's the one I've been reading too! And a couple of others. My vet is going to get info on how the fecal testing works (IE if the lab they use does that). We are in Sicily so something's are a little... Backwards here.
 
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noani

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I've been going over these studies with a doctor friend of mine and a vet friend of his. We are now thinking of trying this approach.

Nobody else has responded to any of our attempts to find her a home. She's now with my boyfriend but he works in another city so he had to take her there. She's scared and skittish. Not taking the change of home very well at all. We are giving her time and space but it's heart breaking to see such a cuddly trusting cat so scared and if we reach out our finger to her, 9/10 he runs away.

This sucks so much, I want to do the responsible thing for my other two but I feel like c... for putting her through this. And we don't have a solution when Christmastime comes... Because he comes back home then (he has to take care of the other two as I'm going to see my family) and like what are we going to do..

So after more research and the doc friends opinions, I think we have made a decision to try the approach. We're running out of options here.. and them getting it from her and then having three cats who will forever pass it around between them - if one ever gets negative they'll just catch it again...

I feel horrible about it because she is healthy and while her not being at any risk for FIP is a benefit also to her, it is mostly for the benefit of the other two and I feel terrible giving her these meds when *she* doesn't actually need them, and if she could just go to a great single cat home she may never need to take them... Granted we don't have that option but still. I feel so conflicted..
 

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FeebysOwner

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I can't say one way or the other about giving her a treatment that really may not be appropriate or needed. Plus, did you ever ask if there is enough history to know if this treatment would prevent the FCoV/shedding from recurring down the road? Not only that, but is this treatment and subsequent results all capable of being done before Christmas? Given what needs to be done just to test this kitten multiple times in order to get a series of negatives, I cannot imagine that similar testing would not be necessary after treatment is completed. That alone runs you well past Christmas - and beyond.

What are all the avenues that you have used in your attempts to find her a new home? Maybe look for a foster-to-adopt who either has no other cats, or ones who have already been tested positive for FCoV?
 
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noani

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I can't say one way or the other about giving her a treatment that really may not be appropriate or needed. Plus, did you ever ask if there is enough history to know if this treatment would prevent the FCoV/shedding from recurring down the road? Not only that, but is this treatment and subsequent results all capable of being done before Christmas? Given what needs to be done just to test this kitten multiple times in order to get a series of negatives, I cannot imagine that similar testing would not be necessary after treatment is completed. That alone runs you well past Christmas - and beyond.

What are all the avenues that you have used in your attempts to find her a new home? Maybe look for a foster-to-adopt who either has no other cats, or ones who have already been tested positive for FCoV?
True, we haven't factored in subsequent testing! We'll have to replan for that. Thanks for pointing that out. I may have to reschedule..

We've tried countless Facebook posts asking both for adoption and for foster to adopt in groups not just in Sicily but in groups nationwide in Italy. I printed flyers at work and brought them everywhere over the city. I wouldn't know about foster to adopt - there is very very little in the way of volunteers here and they've all told me they have no capacity to help (same as what happened with my second cat). There aren't even shelters here, and the only reason this place overflowing with trash isn't ridden with rats is that people just abandon their animals left right and center and there are more strays than you can count on every street. There is zero official support either so it's like... A shot in the dark but I'm still trying.

If that girl who contacted me had wanted her I would have been heartbroken but I would have done it, for her good. I'm just out of options, I've even contacted business contacts with the request to share my posts and send her pictures to their contacts.

Edit to say: sorry if I sound angry. It is by no means directed at you trying to help me. I'm just so frustrated with the situation here and not knowing what else to do anymore.
 
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noani

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Also, yes you're right, there isn't much evidence beyond the hundred odd days they continued testing in that study. Still at the moment it seems like the best shot we've got. We've also researched possible side effects extensively and it seems very safe. Nonetheless I am by no means taking this decision lightly and I'm still not sure if I want to go that route, but my only other options seems to be a)put her back on the street (which I would never do) or b)just keep her at mine, and, if they even get along, probably have three cats either consistently shedding FCoV and /or reinfecting each other with the small but still present risk of one developing fip. So c) give this medication that hasn't thrown up many side effects in the studies where cats got it for 84 days, if not local reactions for those who were treated with injections (and she would only get oral for 10 days) a shot.. and hope for the best. Because the only other option would be to just hope for the best anyways. At least with the meds the chances are higher of her not infecting the others who can then reinfect her and so on. If that makes any sense.
 

FeebysOwner

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If that girl who contacted me had wanted her I would have been heartbroken but I would have done it, for her good.
Do you know why she changed her mind? Do you have contact information for her to see if she knows of someone else that might at least do a foster to adopt (even being at your expense, of course)?
 
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noani

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Do you know why she changed her mind? Do you have contact information for her to see if she knows of someone else that might at least do a foster to adopt (even being at your expense, of course)?
She said she and her boyfriend have a trip to Rome coming up and they just realized they wouldn't know what to do with her then. I offered to cat sit for free even though it's like a 50k drive one way but she just stopped replying after that.
 

FeebysOwner

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b)just keep her at mine, and, if they even get along, probably have three cats either consistently shedding FCoV and /or reinfecting each other with the small but still present risk of one developing fip.
The other conundrum is that IF your cats are not currently shedding the virus, would that also come across as a cat who has never been infected before? In other words, how can one actually tell if a cat has previously been infected if the tests rely on shedders vs. non-shedders???? And, to your point, can a non-shedding cat that tests negative actually be 're-infected' to cause shedding?

I am sorry for throwing so many speculations at you, but you seem to have the ear of some who appear to be 'in the know'.
 
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