Took in another stray but she's positive for FCoV antibodies

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Hi all, I've been trying to do some research but it is very confusing.

I found a stray a week ago and took her home (she's in my bathroom). I have two cats and they haven't had access to each other, and I try to change clothes and wash my hands after I've been with her. We just had some blood work results and she is positive to FIP antibodies. She doesn't seem to have symptoms although she has a bloated tummy but they think it is due to worms.

I don't know what to do now - I am terrified for the other two but I don't know what to do . I haven't found anyone interested in adopting her.

I'm taking my two in tomorrow morning to get blood tests done too.
 

silent meowlook

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Nov 10, 2014
Messages
3,319
Purraise
6,197
Are you talking about the antibody titer test? If so there should be a number. Do you know what it is?
Also try the Facebook group FIP Warriors.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Screenshot_20231128-133640.png

These are the results, there isn't a number there I think.
 

FeebysOwner

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
22,172
Purraise
32,677
Location
Central FL (Born in OH)
Hi. To my knowledge, there is currently no antibody test that will distinguish between coronavirus and 'actual' FIP, which is what the coronavirus can, but rarely, mutate to. So, while this kitten tested positive for coronavirus, it does not mean that she will develop FIP. The number of cats exposed to and carrying antibodies to the coronavirus is high (generally thought to be close to 80%), but the proportion of cats developing FIP is small (<10%). The higher the antibody level/titer number, if you had been provided with one, usually is used only to evaluate how much a cat is shedding the virus at the time of the test. It still is not a valid way to identify FIP as opposed to coronavirus.

It is good to get your other cats tested to see whether or not they have coronavirus antibodies. If they do, there is really no need to keep them separate from this kitten.

Hopefully, the swollen belly is from the worms and that will diminish once treated. If not, the fluid from her belly can be analyzed to see if her coronavirus has mutated to FIP. But, even this testing is not conclusive, and is normally only considered valuable if there are other signs of the disease.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Thank you so so much.

Do you think it's irresponsible to continue to keep her in the bathroom where she's been since I found her last week for another few days? My partner can take her on Friday but he is away for work (he works in another city). I would obviously continue to be careful (or even more so).
Otherwise I'd have to drive her an hour and half there now.

I've been changing clothes to go in to her anyways just as a precaution and washing my hands thoroughly after. Is this enough or are there more precautions I should follow for the next few days?

Mine are going for bloodwork first thing in the morning. Hopefully should have the test results soon (my vet is going to try and speed it up with the lab).
 

FeebysOwner

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
22,172
Purraise
32,677
Location
Central FL (Born in OH)
You mean that she still needs to be thoroughly checked over by a vet, which cannot happen for a few more days? I personally don't see that as being an issue. Many keep a newcomer (kitten or cat) confined to an isolated area for a good period of time, to help adapt them to a new environment and to be checked over by a vet, before they prepare to make introductions with the resident cats. Even if you don't plan on keeping her, there is still an introduction process that has to go on in the event she is with you for a while. Just make sure she is getting plenty of visits and attention in the meantime.
How To Help A New Cat Adjust To Your Home - TheCatSite
How To Successfully Introduce Cats [The Ultimate Guide] - TheCatSite

The most common route of coronavirus is fecal-oral transmission, so I suspect what you are doing now is sufficient. If it turns out that your cats do not have the coronavirus and you really don't want to expose them, then you might sanitize the kitten's room once she leaves your home.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
I mean a few more days until I get the results from the vet if mine have already been exposed anyway, and she can stay, or she can't and my boyfriend will take her to his place to live with him starting Friday.

I've done introductions with mine, so I wasn't going to rush it, and I was keeping her isolated for this purpose but also until she is cleared of all stuff ..
 

FeebysOwner

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
22,172
Purraise
32,677
Location
Central FL (Born in OH)
Oh, I see. Well, my thoughts remain the same about keeping her in a confined area for another few days - one way or the other. No point in taking her to your bf's and then find out you can bring her back after your cats' results come back.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Are you talking about the antibody titer test? If so there should be a number. Do you know what it is?
Also try the Facebook group FIP Warriors.
Hi silentmeowlook, I've just checked again but there isn't a number, only the reference for negative values.

I tried that group but they declined my request saying it is only for actually sick cats to be connected with providers of treatment.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Hi everyone, I've had mine in for bloodwork this morning to see if they already have the same antibodies so if they've already been exposed anyways. I'm finding so much contradictory information though my head is spinning!

Is there anyone here who knows how this antibody , feline coronavirus and actual fip stuff actual works? I really don't know what the best choice is here - I'm so in love with this cat but I don't want to expose my residents to undue risk - but lots of people in Facebook groups have told me it's no big deal. But then others in that group are peddling the new experimental (super expensive) cure so I don't know how to feel about all of those opinions.
 

FeebysOwner

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
22,172
Purraise
32,677
Location
Central FL (Born in OH)
No one knows for sure why some cats who have coronavirus end up with it mutating to FIP. It is assumed to be related to a weak immune system, which can happen in younger cats, most often under the age of 2-3 because they are still developing their immune system. It can happen to older cats whose immune system is weakened by age and other illnesses. The bottom line is there is no guarantee that it will or will not happen. And, there is nothing to treat if it hasn't mutated to FIP; there is no cure for coronavirus. So, the experimental treatments you are reading about are for those who have FIP and the reason they are considered experimental is that there is no guarantee they will reverse FIP.

Have you read medical data about coronavirus and FIP as opposed to relying on the FB groups for your information? I am not saying they can't be helpful, but most contain a lot of personal experience and opinion, which can, for obvious reasons, give mixed signals to you. .
Feline Coronavirus (FCoV) and Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) | Animal Health Topics / School of Veterinary Medicine (ucdavis.edu)
Feline Infectious Peritonitis | Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Yes I've spent most of the night actually reading studies, medical papers and so on. I still found a lot of contradictions, like some say cats will clear the virus in X months and others saying they will always have it. And some in between. I don't know, my head is spinning the more I read up on it.

What I meant with the drug... It might sound horrible but I got the feeling some people are all "just put them together, chances are so low, and FCoV isn't fip and fip is curable anyways, here's a 10000 dollar meds cycle to use if things go south". Like I don't want to say it but I legit got the impression some people are saying this in some groups to make money off eventually sick cats.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
The thing that confuses me is that within the two reputable sources you have linked which I'd looked at as well, one says less than five percent develop fip and the other says 10percent.
And the second one says some say newly acquired cats should be kept separate if suspected to be FCoV positive although the usefulness is debatable - it leaves so many questions for me 🤯why is it debatable, what does that mean
 

FeebysOwner

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
22,172
Purraise
32,677
Location
Central FL (Born in OH)
Science/medical data will never be absolute, that is why you see variances. It is all based on studies, and studies can reap different results, for a whole host of reasons that I am sure I don't need to list here. Besides, would you make a different choice on what to do if both sources said 5%. or both said 10%?

The reason, IMO, for what you denoted in the second one about debating the usefulness of isolating a FCoV suspected cat is because of things like - if the other cats already have coronavirus, there is no reason to isolate. That is probably based on the percentage of cats that are perceived to have been exposed at some point in time.

I think you are searching for concrete answers, and when you are dealing with science/medicine you are not going to find them. If your cats test positive, then there is nothing more to worry about. If they don't then you will have to weigh your decision on what you have researched, fully well knowing that none of the data is 100% guaranteed.

Let me put it this way - two human beings can be diagnosed with the same cancer, get the same treatment, and yet one recovers and one does not. See a parallel? There are just no absolutes in life, as much as we would like there to be
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Thank you for your patience. I think I need to take a few days to digest it all, wait for their results and then start thinking about making a decision. I think I'm a bit clutching at straws trying to rationalize my wish to keep her but if they are negative.. then yeah, it's just added risk for them.
 

misty8723

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Jan 16, 2006
Messages
7,660
Purraise
8,039
Location
North Carolina
It's not contagious. I had the same reaction when a young cat I adopted got FIP. I panicked about my resident cat, but I was assured by more than one vet and by my research it wasn't contagious. I was also reassured by the rescue where I adopted her from. My initial reaction was to let them know because she had been part of a litter and in the room with a lot of other cats when we met her. They said nobody knows why it mutates in some cats, but it is not to worry about other cats they come in contact with. The treatment does work, I know of several cats who have been cured, from a rescue my sister's friend volunteers at. This friend has had a few FIP cats that she fostered while they were being treated (and she has quite a few of her own as well). From that rescue, I understand before treatment is started they need to be very sure it is FIP and not something else or it will just make the cat worse. The treatment wasn't available when my poor Darcy got sick, though. If the treatment had been available I would have moved heaven and earth to get it for her. I've never known a sweeter cat. FIP is horrible and no kitten should have to go through that. Thank you for taking care of this little one.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #19

noani

TCS Member
Thread starter
Alpha Cat
Joined
Oct 3, 2021
Messages
455
Purraise
483
Thank you, I've since learned she doesn't have fip luckily but she's positive only to the feline coronavirus. I don't think I can change the title anymore, is there any way to do that?
 

FeebysOwner

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
22,172
Purraise
32,677
Location
Central FL (Born in OH)
It's not contagious.
FIP is not contagious. The coronavirus that can mutate to FIP is.
I understand before treatment is started they need to be very sure it is FIP and not something else
Yes, the treatments are not valuable unless FIP is diagnosed. It will do nothing for the coronavirus.
I don't think I can change the title anymore, is there any way to do that?
I flagged your post to the moderators about changing the title Hopefully, they will handle it.
 
Last edited:
Top