Tips On Stray We're Taking to the Vet

DizzyAvocado

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So we are taking this stray cat to the vet on Tuesday to check for a microchip, vaccinated, and neutered. I have a few questions about this though. If he has FIP/FIV what do we do? I've heard a lot of mixed info surrounding the topic and while I don't want to have a cat euthanized, I also can't have my other cat getting infected. Do we just take the vets advice? I'd appreciate any advice on this matter, thanks so much!
 

shadowsrescue

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I assume you mean Fiv( feline aids) and FELV( feline leukemia). FIP is Feline infectious peritonitis and has 2 different forms. Many cats would be sick if they had FIP.

FIV is the milder of the two infections that would be tested. Cats can live a normal life with FIV with an inside life and good nutrition. I have 2 cats with FIV. Both are 9 now. FIV is the least contagious of the two as well. It is only transmitted through a deep bite wound. Most neutered cats do not fight with the intent of a deep bite wound. One of my FIV cats has bitten 3 of my other cats. There has been no infection transfer.

FELV is the most serious. It is highly contagious. It can be transmitted through shared grooming, food bowls, litter box and of course bites or scratches. Cats that are inside only and an only cat can live a decent life until the infection takes hold. In multi cat households, FELV cats should not mingle with other cats. It can be difficult to have more than one cat if one is FELV positive. There are some sanctuaries that take in FELV cats and allow them to live among other cats that are also infected.

Many vets will recommend euthanizing a FELV cat. If you do not have some place where this cat could live as a single cat then it might be the best option. Living outside should not be an option as the cat can transmit this to other cats. Also living outside makes it much harder on the cat and with a compromised immune system it's even worse.

Some vets also recommend to euthanize FIV cats. This is more of the old school thinking. I would never euthanize an FIV cat unless the cat was extremely aggressive and could not live with other cats. I have 7 cats. All live inside and 2 have FIV. All of my cats mingle and there has been no transfer. As I said above it takes a lot for a cat to pass it on to another cat as along as the cats are neutered.

I do hope all will go well on Tuesday with the vet visit. You do not have to make a decision on the spot. You could take the cat home and think about it for awhile or see if other arrangements can be made.

Thank you for caring about this sweet stray. Please update us on Tuesday.
 
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DizzyAvocado

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Thank you so much for the quick response! I've never taken in a stray before so there's a lot of terminology that I simply am not sure of, so thank you for that as well. We will be keeping him in the bathroom the night before the appointment. Would that be enough contact to potentially infect the other cat if he had FELV? I will absolutely update on Tuesday.
 

shadowsrescue

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Thank you so much for the quick response! I've never taken in a stray before so there's a lot of terminology that I simply am not sure of, so thank you for that as well. We will be keeping him in the bathroom the night before the appointment. Would that be enough contact to potentially infect the other cat if he had FELV? I will absolutely update on Tuesday.
Just be sure to clean the bathroom well and wash any bedding and bowls the cat ate from. If possible keep your resident cat out of the bathroom until you have the results.
 
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