Sub q fluids different types

furrypurry

TCS Member
Thread starter
Adult Cat
Joined
Apr 30, 2010
Messages
194
Purraise
125
Normosol R is what my vet recommends. I am not liking what I read about it possibly stinging or burning. Is it better than Lactated Ringers or different in some way? I have no problems with the needle stick, but my sweet kitty starts complaining when the fluid starts to flow. I warm the bag slightly before use. All the vet techs I have spoken with think it is just the odd feel of the fluid that he is objecting to, because it is a new experience. He does seem fine afterwards. We are doing 100ml daily currently and may be able to do fewer days eventually. I just HATE to think this might be painful for him.
 

LTS3

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Aug 29, 2014
Messages
15,636
Purraise
14,469
Location
USA
From Subcutaneous Fluids – IBDKitties

Normosol-R, Plasmalyte A, Isolyte S
These subq fluids are generally the same but have different manufacturers. If a cat has high calcium levels, liver problems, or lymphoma, your vet might prescribe one of these fluids. Normosol-R is provided in two different pHs (6.6, similar to LRS, and 7.4). The more alkaline version (pH 7.4) is more indicated for cats with higher calcium levels, liver problems, or lymphoma. It has been noted that these fluids may cause cats to vomit after administration of them. They also tend to sting the cat and can cause twitching at the needle insertion site. In addition, these subq fluids contain magnesium and may be contraindicated in cats with high magnesium levels.

Lactated Ringers Solution (LRS)
LRS is the most common type of subq fluids used for cats with AKD or CKD. In cats with CKD, the lactate in the LRS is metabolized in the liver and converted to bicarbonate that can help those CKD cats that have mild metabolic acidosis. LRS also contains potassium and is a good choice for those CKD cats with lower potassium levels; however, there is a point that low potassium cannot be corrected solely with LRS and your vet may need to prescribe supplemental potassium.


If you have concerns about the type of fluids the vet prescribe, it would be best to discuss them with the vet and understand why the vet prescribed that particular fluid over another type.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3

furrypurry

TCS Member
Thread starter
Adult Cat
Joined
Apr 30, 2010
Messages
194
Purraise
125
Thanks, that was the info I had seen.
My vet switched us to LRS today and things went much better with our fluids session, which tells me the Normosol must indeed be harder for my cat to tolerate.
 
Top