Stray tested positive for felv, worried my cats were exposed

stephaniev

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My husband and I found a stray a couple nights ago and have been keeping her isolated from our other cats as much as possible. Yesterday she got out and may have used our other cats litter box, or are their food/drank their water. We took her to the vet today and she tested positive for felv. I'm worried she might have infected our other cats. Our vet said it was a possibility but I'm not sure how possible and if I should be worried. Like is it very lightly or not likely since she one had contact with them that one time? I tried to call my vet back but the clinic is very busy and they are not able to answer.
 

di and bob

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I have one cat that is positive for leukemia, and doing research found that they are saying now it usually takes a deep bite to infect another, not casual contact like yours had. This is NOT an automatic death sentence like once thought, my cats are 7 and 8 years old and the one was diagnosed 18 months ago after repeated illnesses, so had it a while. Older cats especially (those over a year old) can fight it off, though can be carriers. I assume all three of mine have it because they have all been bitten by various strays when they were outside strays themselves. I keep them strictly indoors to ward off illnesses and give them DMG (to keep their immune systems up) and LifeGold for cancers, both of which I get on Amazon and Walmart. I really don't think you have anything to worry about with one casual contact, and no bites.
 
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stephaniev

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I have one cat that is positive for leukemia, and doing research found that they are saying now it usually takes a deep bite to infect another, not casual contact like yours had. This is NOT an automatic death sentence like once thought, my cats are 7 and 8 years old and the one was diagnosed 18 months ago after repeated illnesses, so had it a while. Older cats especially (those over a year old) can fight it off, though can be carriers. I assume all three of mine have it because they have all been bitten by various strays when they were outside strays themselves. I keep them strictly indoors to ward off illnesses and give them DMG (to keep their immune systems up) and LifeGold for cancers, both of which I get on Amazon and Walmart. I really don't think you have anything to worry about with one casual contact, and no bites.
I feel horrible that they were exposed. She was out with them for awhile while we were gone (we thought we closed the door tight after checking on her) I don't know if I should throw out their toys and switch out all the litter or if I'm being over dramatic. there weren't any bit marks and she was just chillin in the living room with them when we got home. do you know of any reputable sites for information? Everytime I google something I go into full panic mode from the results. It's so hard to find actual article or sites that are knowlegible. Thank you! I appreciate you taking the time to respond!
 

fionasmom

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Direct contact between cats is the most frequent method of FeLV infection. The virus is fragile and cannot survive longer than a few hours outside of the cat. A cat with FeLV sheds a large quantity of the virus in its saliva, as well as in other bodily fluids such as nasal secretions, urine and feces. However, FeLV is not a highly contagious virus, and transmission generally requires a prolonged period of close contact between infected and susceptible cats. Close contact activities include mating, mutual grooming, and sharing of litter trays and food bowls. Cat bites by an infected cat can readily transmit infection. From VCA Hospital website

ats persistently infected with FeLV serve as sources of infection for other cats. The virus is shed in saliva, nasal secretions, urine, feces, and milk of infected cats. Cat-to-cat transfer of the virus may occur from a bite wound, during mutual grooming, and (rarely) through the shared use of litter boxes and feeding dishes. Transmission can also take place from an infected mother cat to her kittens, either before they are born or while they are nursing. FeLV does not survive long outside a cat's body – probably less than a few hours under normal household conditions From Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine


Feline leukemia is a disease that only affects cats -- it cannot be transmitted to people, dogs, or other animals. FeLV is passed from one cat to another through saliva, blood, and to some extent, urine and feces. The virus does not live long outside the cat’s body -- probably just a few hours. Grooming and fighting seem to be the commonest ways for infection to spread. Kittens can contract the disease in utero or through an infected mother’s milk. The disease is often spread by apparently healthy cats, so even if a cat appears healthy, it may be infected and able to transmit the virus. Web MD

I did not mean to bold Cornell for any particular reason. Hopefully these sites might make you feel a little bit better. One of my own doctors told me that if I was going to google medical advice to use Web MD or Mayo Clinic only.
 

di and bob

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I, too, went into panic mode, then severe sadness. But the good news is that older cats are much more able to fight off the disease. I do recommend giving your cats some kind supplement to build up their immune systems, I recommend DMG. Don't read too many articles, they had depressed. Just clean things and pray. I am Just so happy to have mine 18 months later and they are all fat and happy! Just live one day at a time......
 
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stephaniev

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Thank you everyone for the quick and kind responses!!! We are working on getting the kitten into a no kill shelter in our area that takes fip and felv positive kitties.
 

mittens23

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My husband and I found a stray a couple nights ago and have been keeping her isolated from our other cats as much as possible. Yesterday she got out and may have used our other cats litter box, or are their food/drank their water. We took her to the vet today and she tested positive for felv. I'm worried she might have infected our other cats. Our vet said it was a possibility but I'm not sure how possible and if I should be worried. Like is it very lightly or not likely since she one had contact with them that one time? I tried to call my vet back but the clinic is very busy and they are not able to answer.
I have a male who had chronic fever. They did the SNAP test. He was diagnosed with Felve. We already exposed to our other cats. The vet told me nothing we could do. Basically euthanize him. I took him home to die. I took him in during the terrible freeze storm in West Texas. My husband came across a u tube segment. Can the Power of God heal my cat. I watched it. Believed it. 2nd scare he would not eat. I put him on recovery food. Took him back to a different vet. He suggested two strong antibiotic shots. Told me to isolate him. No go. He wanted to play and be around our other cats. We let him. He is doing so well now. Eating up a storm as if he was never sick. The most Gentlest cat we ever had. So fear vs faith. I choose to apply my faith. God is in the business of miracles. I will keep you updated.
 

mittens23

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I, too, went into panic mode, then severe sadness. But the good news is that older cats are much more able to fight off the disease. I do recommend giving your cats some kind supplement to build up their immune systems, I recommend DMG. Don't read too many articles, they had depressed. Just clean things and pray. I am Just so happy to have mine 18 months later and they are all fat and happy! Just live one day at a time......
Same here. Where can I get this DMG?
 

tarasgirl06

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S stephaniev and anyone else interested:
New FIV, FeLV guidelines: What do they mean for shelter cats? » Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program » College of Veterinary Medicine » University of Florida
and there is documentation for guardians of cats in the home.
Basically, no, there is no reason to panic. FeLV is NOT a death sentence, nor is it easy to catch. Read and take heart. And THANK YOU from my heart for protecting the kitten and working on getting him to safe haven.
And big props to you, M mittens23 *Agree 100*. When things are difficult, no matter your religion or ideology, look UP.
 
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