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Stray Dog Concerned About My Kids

Dogfound57

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Hi folks,

My wife, son and I found a recently strayed 3 month pup. When we took him to the vet they said he had fleas and open wounds from scratching. Cost us a pretty penny to get him 'defleaed' and injections started.

My concern is two fold. First, the vet said the deflea medicine would work over night. As a dad I was skeptical, is this the case? Second and most importantly my wife is three months pregnant and we have a three year old. Can anyone suggest any concerns or precautions in getting this little guy back to health and a family member? We live in China so there isn't exactly animal shelters to look for advice and despite my misgivings about having a new pet, once he's in, he's in. Whatever it costs? Any advice/suggestions would hugely appreciated as I am Irish and tend to fall back on the old school 'it'll be fine if he gets injections and a wash'
 

amethyst

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It depends on what flea meds were used, but yes in most cases the adult fleas are killed off in less then 24 hours. Depending on how bad the fleas are, and as I said what medicine is used, you also need a flea preventative on a regular schedule or he will get fleas again. I would also get him dewormed, fleas can carry tapeworm, and most dogs will pick up other worms from eating stuff they shouldn't outside, especially a stray.

If he is otherwise healthy I wouldn't worry too much about being around your wife and kids once he has been fully vaccinated and dewormed. Obviously I wouldn't have your wife doing the poop scooping/cleaning up after the pup though, just in case.
 

Furballsmom

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Hi!
You've gotten good advice -
Maybe I can ask a second cat/dog person to pop in for you 1 bruce 1 1 bruce 1 do you have a moment?
 

fionasmom

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Years and years of rescued dogs including the present one who had mange when I got him. Flea meds usually do work very quickly now and I am assuming that the dog was given the drop on the back type or a pill. In your case, I would not start with sprays or anything else that could spread around more easily. If you spot tapeworms, go to the vet and get the medication for it. Again, a pill and not very many of them. The OTC type tend to be insecticides...and don't use Hartz products. Fleas should be controllable with a monthly treatment. All of those treatments should be very safe around anyone as long as they are not misused...like someone ingesting them or rubbing them on themselves. If you are using the liquid flea treatment which goes on the back, let it dry before you touch that spot or allow anyone else to do so, although washing your hands will take care of it. Given you were kind enough to vet the dog and start treatment, along with adopting him, I don't see any danger if you just use the same common sense you would use around any animal.
 

1 bruce 1

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Hi folks,

My wife, son and I found a recently strayed 3 month pup. When we took him to the vet they said he had fleas and open wounds from scratching. Cost us a pretty penny to get him 'defleaed' and injections started.

My concern is two fold. First, the vet said the deflea medicine would work over night. As a dad I was skeptical, is this the case? Second and most importantly my wife is three months pregnant and we have a three year old. Can anyone suggest any concerns or precautions in getting this little guy back to health and a family member? We live in China so there isn't exactly animal shelters to look for advice and despite my misgivings about having a new pet, once he's in, he's in. Whatever it costs? Any advice/suggestions would hugely appreciated as I am Irish and tend to fall back on the old school 'it'll be fine if he gets injections and a wash'
Do you know the name of the flea medications given? Was it a shot, a vial of liquid down his back, a pill?
I've read some research papers that suggest small children who live with pets grow up to be more robust and have less things like allergies, respiratory problems, and in general are just healthier for it.
If you have a very fine toothed comb this will help you locate a problem with fleas or flea dirt. Are there any other pets in the house? They may need to be treated as well, to keep the fleas that manage to escape the pup from leaping onto another dog or cat and making them the "new host".
Having a 3 year old child, a new 3 month old puppy and a baby due in 6 months or so is probably worrying, but I grew up with siblings and dogs and cats and we were all fine. :)
 

Furballsmom

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I have a neighbor who years ago wanted to get a dog but didn't dare to do so because her son was very allergic. Then someone told her that getting the dog while her son was still young would eventually cause that allergen trigger to diminish to the point that it wouldn't be a problem, and it actually did work :)
 

1 bruce 1

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I have a neighbor who years ago wanted to get a dog but didn't dare to do so because her son was very allergic. Then someone told her that getting the dog while her son was still young would eventually cause that allergen trigger to diminish to the point that it wouldn't be a problem, and it actually did work :)
There are some dogs that are said to be "hypoallergenic" (like Poodles and whatnot) but it's always said it there's a HUGE allergy (that extends to the skin, lungs, etc.,) that having that kid be around those dogs (at a pet owners home or a breeder of those dogs) can help you determine if that will work or not.
I had a "nerd" sibling that was allergic to ALMOST everything (and got picked on in school) but wasn't bothered by dogs, cats, horses as a kid. Only when they moved to a pet free apartment in the city, then came back to see us for a visit did they experience a flare, but it was minor. Didn't stop them from learning to ride a horse.
We had a lovely lady working for us years ago that was so allergic to cats that we wouldn't let her vacuum any areas the cats were in (or scoop boxes). She was around them but didn't spend a lot of time interacting with them, and a few months after low key exposure, she realized they didn't bother her anymore. Until she left, she could scoop boxes and vac cat trees like a champion.
 

kashmir64

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My biggest concern would be aggression testing. Have the pup meet new people in different situations. Put down pup's food and see if you can get near it while he eats without getting bit. Introduce pup (on leash) to other animals and see how the pup reacts. Fleas and worms can be dealt with, but not always aggression. I would also have a vet do a fecal sample for Giardia. You don't want your wife and kids getting this parasite.
 

1 bruce 1

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My biggest concern would be aggression testing. Have the pup meet new people in different situations. Put down pup's food and see if you can get near it while he eats without getting bit. Introduce pup (on leash) to other animals and see how the pup reacts. Fleas and worms can be dealt with, but not always aggression. I would also have a vet do a fecal sample for Giardia. You don't want your wife and kids getting this parasite.
For the food test, be aware of what you're seeing. A dog wagging his tail isn't always happy. If they're stiff, frozen body language, lift their head out of the bowl and look at you "out of the corner of their eye", this is a potential problem. If they eat faster when you approach and move their body around so it's blocking the bowl, take note and talk to a trainer before you adopt this pup.
There are very safe ways to deal with minor food aggression, but with kids in the house it's not something I'd be chomping at the bit to take on.
 
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