Source of blood?

cmshap

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Late tonight, I randomly discovered drops of blood in one spot on my hardwood floor. There were about 4-5 droplets 1/8" in diameter, and one larger one maybe 1/4" in diameter. It was fresh -- bright red, wiped up easily, and smelled coppery.

No blood anywhere else that I can see in my apartment. No blood in Willy's water dish, or in the litter box. No blood on me (I checked myself to see if I was bleeding and didn't notice, but couldn't find anything on my body). No other humans or animals in the household.

I looked in Willy's mouth, checked his rear end, feet, and ears (he has what is probably a yeast infection in his ears, but they look the same as in the previous thread I started about it). No blood in any of these areas.

Any other ideas for where I should look? I haven't seen any blood anywhere other than in this one spot, which is what's so weird about it. I'd expect additional drops elsewhere if he was actively bleeding.

This isn't really worrying me, but I am posting so I make sure to cover everything, if anyone else has suggestions for where else to check on his body. Also, I hate an unsolved mystery.

Update: I later found a nail tip from one of his claws on my couch. It looked kind of like a "sheath" as if the top plus a portion of nail around it had been pulled off the nail. And there was a split along the side of it. It also had a dark spot inside of it, which I'm assuming was dried blood. I didn't think to take a pic of it before I threw it away.

I haven't been diligent about trimming his nails, so I'm guessing the end of one split off, although I can't tell which one when I try to examine his rear claws (he doesnt have front claws). They all look fine from a quick observation, but he is difficult with nail touching, and I can't restrain him while looking closely for longer than a few seconds.

He may have opened it up while running around tonight and bled a little bit. That is the most logical explanation I can come up with.

I received some great advice about trimming his nails in the thread I linked above, but I confess I haven't yet tried any harder to get it done. It is a difficult task and one of those things I keep putting off. So maybe this is a wake-up-call for starting to put more effort into it. While a little bleeding is nothing to worry about, a potential infection is.
 
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di and bob

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Losing nail sheaths is common and happens as the nails grow, so necessary. It is possible he pulled one off prematurely and caused a little bleeding. Maybe he got a claw caught. Cats lick a sore place often so you wouldn't see it. Usually, blood on the floor in droplets means from teh nose or mouth though. This time of teh year he may have sneezed violently and caused some bleeding. If there is any way to check his mouth (I know, on mine it would be impossible too) that would be great, it could be a broken or bad tooth. I would write a note and have the vet check his mouth the next time he is in, or bring him in now for shots, etc. they are too scared to refuse a vet looking. Blood is not something to just ignore, but could be a one-time thing from a small tear. keep your eyes out for more!
 
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cmshap

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This time of teh year he may have sneezed violently and caused some bleeding. If there is any way to check his mouth (I know, on mine it would be impossible too) that would be great, it could be a broken or bad tooth.
I checked his mouth already, and saw nothing immediately obvious. I can examine his mouth more easily than his claws, actually... probably because I've given him a lot of pills over the years, and I've been pilling him for about 6 years now, whenever he is prescribed something. So he may be a little more tolerant to having his mouth pried open, since every time is rewarded with a treat.

He does have a chronic sneezing problem, which he's had his whole life as a consequence of being sick when abandoned outside before age 1. But I've never once seen any blood from his nose in 9 years. Good call though, that's another plausible explanation.

I'm going to have my vet take a closer look at his mouth, though, especially because he's also become a drool-monster lately.
 
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iPappy

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If the claw sheath you found looked to have some dried blood on it, that would be my first guess. It may have bled a tiny bit before clotting, especially if the quik was only scraped vs. actually "cut", if that makes sense. Did you notice any other signs of sneezing on the floor (a spray of nasal drip mist, etc.)?
A few months ago I found something similar on the floor. A few tiny droplets of blood and nothing anywhere else. I never found out what it was from, but everyone has been fine since.
 
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cmshap

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If the claw sheath you found looked to have some dried blood on it, that would be my first guess.
That's where I'm leaning, too. I live in an old building with original hardwood floors, so the cracks between the planks are wider in some areas from many years of wear. When he is running around, his untrimmed claws could easily get caught, I think. Maybe it tore off a bit unnaturally.

Did you notice any other signs of sneezing on the floor (a spray of nasal drip mist, etc.)?
He does get snotty from time to time, but it's always pale yellow in color (i.e., "normal"), never with any blood in it. And there wasn't any snot on the floor with the blood; there was only blood.

That's a good point; if it did come from a sneeze, it would very likely be bloody mucus, not just blood.

BTW, this chronic sneezing and snottiness has been examined by vets over his whole life and determined to be incurable. But a 10-day course of zeniquin helps the symptoms a lot when they flare up significantly, which is about a yearly occurrence.
 

iPappy

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That's where I'm leaning, too. I live in an old building with original hardwood floors, so the cracks between the planks are wider in some areas from many years of wear. When he is running around, his untrimmed claws could easily get caught, I think. Maybe it tore off a bit unnaturally.



He does get snotty from time to time, but it's always pale yellow in color (i.e., "normal"), never with any blood in it. And there wasn't any snot on the floor with the blood; there was only blood.

That's a good point; if it did come from a sneeze, it would very likely be bloody mucus, not just blood.

BTW, this chronic sneezing and snottiness has been examined by vets over his whole life and determined to be incurable. But a 10-day course of zeniquin helps the symptoms a lot when they flare up significantly, which is about a yearly occurrence.
Can you handle his feet? You might see a shorter than normal claw if that's what happened.
I had a cat that had the worst URI I've ever seen in my life as a baby kitten. When we found her, the poor thing couldn't even sleep laying down, she slept propped up because I don't think she could breathe laying down. The URI cleared up and she lived into her late teens and was probably one of the healthiest cats I've ever had, but was a chronic sneezer/snotter her entire life. It never seemed to cause any real problems for her. :)
 
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cmshap

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Can you handle his feet? You might see a shorter than normal claw if that's what happened.
I looked right after I found the blood, and just tried to look again now, but he's difficult with handling his claws. I can grab his feet, no problem, but when I extend the claws to look at them, I have about one second before bunny kicks start. I didn't notice any difference between individual nails, but I'm not really getting a close look.

The URI cleared up and she lived into her late teens and was probably one of the healthiest cats I've ever had, but was a chronic sneezer/snotter her entire life. It never seemed to cause any real problems for her. :)
That's good to hear, because Willy has a similar story. His lungs were in "terrible shape" as my vet said when seeing him for the first time. With treatment, it cleared up, but left him as a sneezing snot-rocket ever since. But he's been very healthy, otherwise... never any problems other than food sensitivity.

My theory is that cats who survive such terrible illnesses early in life are survivors, and just have good genes to help them get through it, so they may be more likely to be healthier in general. That's my hope for him, anyway.

The snottiness has been more of a problem for me than for him (ever get blasted in the face with a sneezing, snotty cat while they are kneading on you?). He couldn't care less, always running around like a maniac and playing his heart out regardless of however much sneezing he had to do. But it's actually not as bad now as in his earlier years, before we tried zeniquin as a periodic treatment for the symptoms.
 
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cmshap

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was a chronic sneezer/snotter her entire life.
A bit more off-topic, but I'm curious about something. Did she "clean up" after herself at all?

This will probably sound gross to anyone who's never had a snotty cat... but throughout Willy's life, I've observed that whenever he gets snot on a surface near him where he can see it, he compulsively cleans it all up. It seems to me like it's a behavior that is governed by the same "leave no trace" instincts that are behind burying waste, or burying vomit (whenever he vomits on the floor, he "digs" on the floor in a perimeter around it).

TBH, I am much more appreciative when he does this than grossed out by it. But I've lived with him for 9 years, so I'm very used to it by now.
 

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You might want to change his litter to shredded paper until the nail heals, depending on how bad it is.
 

fionasmom

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My theory is that cats who survive such terrible illnesses early in life are survivors, and just have good genes to help them get through it, so they may be more likely to be healthier in general. That's my hope for him, anyway.
I have always thought this as well. While it is probably not something that can be proved more than anecdotally, I have had some very long lived ex ferals, a few of whom required almost no vet visits in their lives.
 
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