Siberian cat

h0n3ybee

TCS Member
Thread starter
Kitten
Joined
Aug 4, 2023
Messages
1
Purraise
1
Hi everyone!
I'm new to this page:)

I really want to start a cattery.
My reasons are:
- I love cats
- Siberian cats are a healthy breed
- knowledge of the breed
- marked for the breed
- I know I will give them a happy home with follow ups

Like I've said, a want to start a cattery. I only want one breeding female to start with.

My question is: how do I start?

Can anyone go to the process with me?

Oh I forgot to tell that I've already have to female sibs and one that is decreased:(
 

cmshap

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Nov 21, 2019
Messages
1,490
Purraise
3,531
Location
Milwaukee, WI
I don't know anything about breeding, the ethics thereof, etc., but I just wanted to say that my mom was able to become a cat owner by adopting a Siberian from a Siberian breeder.

She would have adopted a rescue from a shelter, but she is allergic to most cats (sometimes quite severely). She read that Siberians can be hypoallergenic, and found a breeder who was able to allow her to visit the cattery multiple times and see how she did. Fast-forward years later, my mom is a happy owner of a Siberian female, who adds a lot to her life.
 

sivyaleah

TCS Member
Veteran
Joined
Dec 16, 2011
Messages
6,264
Purraise
5,229
Location
New Jersey
Beginning breeding is not for the feint of heart.

Things to consider/know/keep in mind, this is paraphrased from elsewhere but all good info/advice. I'm sure I've missed some.

1. DNA testing for both parents , HCM screening prior to breeding for both parents as well as a PKD ultrasound. Echos prior to a year, and those who aren't performed by a board certified cardiologist, are a waste of time.

2. Attending cat shows. This will help you evaluate your cats temperaments outside of the home being a suitable pet does not mean they are physical specimens worthy of being bred. Do they have to bring the house down of course not - but by attending 1 show you will know 1) do they have any disqualifying faults? 2) do they have suitable temperaments and 3) helps put you in touch with local like minded folks who might be able/willing to give advice and help and 4) are they of substantial enough breed type to be considered beyond just the health testing. It must be a complete package to truly take cat to that level. Going to shows is a great way to network. You will need to do this in order to find someone who has a stud you can use.

3. Cat's are not dogs - they do not cycle every 6 months for a few days and then whew, back to normal. Cats cycle and cycle and cycle until they get bred, pyo ( and die sometimes) or develop cystic ovaries and are no longer capable of breeding and often develop other problems.

4. Cats pee on things - girls especially. In toaster, in stoves, behind walls, in vents, on beds etc. Males probably will spray. You will be cleaning constantly.

5. Hopefully the breeder you purchased your original cats from will be there to mentor you. But it is not for the weak. Your whole life becomes about caring ( when done properly) for those animals to meet their needs. And that doesn't even TOUCH on how you are going to go about finding homes for the babies, early spay/neuter, legal contracts, et. al.

6. I n addition to the testing, breeding with a purpose and a goal in mind is essential. Understanding COI, how and when to outcross, color genetics and rules, learning about the lines, how they develop, what they carry, understanding conformation, health issues, obtaining a mentor.

7. Plan on showing your cats as it's the best way to make sure your breeding program is moving forward and not in the wrong direction. Show an alter and obtain a grand champion (or better) through your chosen registry before ever producing a litter.

8. Do you have the time, money and energy to devote yourself to breeding? Are you ok with not having vacations, attending family events and such in the case of an emergency? Do you have people to help you?
 

iPappy

TCS Member
Staff Member
Forum Helper
Joined
Jun 1, 2022
Messages
5,138
Purraise
16,036
To add to what sivyaleah sivyaleah said, please remember that even a kitten that appears to be show quality from DNA tested show quality parents might not turn out as planned. Personally, the first thing I would do would be to reach out to breeders and ask them to mentor you because you want to do this, and you want to do it right :) Not all breeders will be in the position to mentor you but if you tell them what you're wanting to do, they may be able to find others that would be willing to help you at least temporarily.
I'm very glad that you want to do this to the best of your ability and aren't just jumping into it :) Best wishes!
 

posiepurrs

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Jan 11, 2015
Messages
2,700
Purraise
6,269
Location
Western Massachusetts, USA
Beginning breeding is not for the feint of heart.

Things to consider/know/keep in mind, this is paraphrased from elsewhere but all good info/advice. I'm sure I've missed some.

1. DNA testing for both parents , HCM screening prior to breeding for both parents as well as a PKD ultrasound. Echos prior to a year, and those who aren't performed by a board certified cardiologist, are a waste of time.
I agree with most of this post. Study your breed and learn the health problems and testing needed. Then make that testing a priority. Find a breeder friendly vet who is knowledgeable in your breed if possible. Breeder friendly vets are few and far between. Also you may want to check your local laws concerning breeding as I know there are some areas it is prohibited.
 

posiepurrs

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Jan 11, 2015
Messages
2,700
Purraise
6,269
Location
Western Massachusetts, USA
Some things I forgot in my previous post. Every breed (and even mixed breeds) has some type of health issues, even in ‘healthy’ breeds. Be prepared to lose sleep when kittens are due or you have a sick cat. Also be prepared for emergency vet visits both financially and emotionally. Know that you can and will be devastated at times ( losing kittens or maybe even Mom). Learn how to help if the mother is having trouble as deliveries never seem to happen when the vet is open or you may not have time to get to the vet. You can’t be squeamish. I am not trying to scare you but prepare you for possibilities. There is also fantastic things that happen too, like when the kittens first hiss at you ( and they will) or when they take those first stumbling steps. Then there is the sweet heartbreak of sending them to their new homes. Go to shows, network with breeders and get a mentor. If you show, and you should so you know how your breeding program is developing, learn to groom properly.
 
Top