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tabbytom

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So I've been taking more pictures of my garden, trying to get really well focused close up shots. I realize part of the problem is that it's always windy around here, so the plants are always moving. Plus, when I stoop down to take a picture, it's had to stay steady and not cause camera shaking. Anyway, here's a few I think turned out ok-ish.
Beautiful blooms!

Yes, the flowers are a little out of focus. Shooting flowers outdoor is a challenge because of the wind. You need to do a little hard work here. First, you need a tripod that can go low so that you need not hold the camera and compose while at an awkward position. Second, to conquer the wind, use some light sturdy boards to block the wind so that the flowers don't dance around.

These are just sone tips on shooting flowers.

Good try on these flowers.
 

rubysmama

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On another note, I have noticed the bumblebees working the various flowers a lot, but not so many honey bees. Has anyone else noticed this?
I haven't noticed, but also not too many flowers blooming right now.

These are just sone tips on shooting flowers.
Thanks for the tips. I have a tripod, so must dig it out and dust it off. Would I set the timer, to try to prevent camera shake, or just press the shutter as usual.

I'm still only using the auto setting on my camera. For some reason, no matter how much I read about it, I just cannot seem to grasp the concept of aperture and exposure, etc. I think I need a Photography for Super-Dummies book. :lol:
 

Tobermory

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On another note, I have noticed the bumblebees working the various flowers a lot, but not so many honey bees. Has anyone else noticed this?
I saw your question before I took my walk this morning, so I was paying closer attention than usual. There’s a cluster of blooming salvia and lavender near our place, and the plants were covered with happy, humming little bumblebees…and almost no honeybees. In the opposite direction, there’s a large, old tree with an active beehive about 15 feet up. That, at least, is still busy with bees coming and going.
 

NY cat man

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I haven't noticed, but also not too many flowers blooming right now.



Thanks for the tips. I have a tripod, so must dig it out and dust it off. Would I set the timer, to try to prevent camera shake, or just press the shutter as usual.

I'm still only using the auto setting on my camera. For some reason, no matter how much I read about it, I just cannot seem to grasp the concept of aperture and exposure, etc. I think I need a Photography for Super-Dummies book. :lol:
I believe you have the same camera, so here is what I do. I use the manual focus instead of the auto focus, zoom to 55mm and focus, then back off to frame the shot. I use the Av setting on the dial for aperture preference, and have the image stabilizer in the 'on' position. Using a tripod means you don't need the timer. Anyway, that's what seems to work for me.
 

NY cat man

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I almost forgot; I set the ISO speed to 1600 to minimize blur and so I can use smaller apertures or higher shutter speeds, depending on what effect I want.
 

tabbytom

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Thanks for the tips. I have a tripod, so must dig it out and dust it off. Would I set the timer, to try to prevent camera shake, or just press the shutter as usual.

I'm still only using the auto setting on my camera. For some reason, no matter how much I read about it, I just cannot seem to grasp the concept of aperture and exposure, etc. I think I need a Photography for Super-Dummies book. :lol:
You're welcomed.

The other way is to use a shutter release cable which eliminates vibrations and camera shake. Even if you mount it on the tripod and activate the self timer, you still have to press the shutter to activate the self timer which could have moved the camera slightly out of position and your focus is off. That is why many photographers invest in a good solid tripod.

Using auto settings is ok but sometimes they don't read the subject very well. Sometimes they act smart and give you the wrong reading.

Basically, what you need is to understand what is shutter speed exposure setting as these two settings go hand in hand together with the ISO setting.

Example, to shoot the Day Lily on a normal bright day, lets say it's a perfect setting, no wind and no harsh sun,

Camera on manual setting, ISO 100, aperture f8, shutter speed 250 (meaning aperture and shutter speed reading is in line with each other), camera mounted on tripod with cable release, compose the shot, manually focus on the stamens and once in focus, release the shutter via the cable release.

Or you can set the camera to auto mode that sets the aperture and shutter speed automatically at ISO 100 or higher or lower, the rest is the same or set camera at shutter speed or aperture setting snd the camera will calculate accordingly for the right exposure and the rest is the same meaning, camera on tripod with cable release and compose and focus manually.

These are the many ways to achieve exposure. You just need to practice and practice. Good thing it is digital and not on film.
 

rubysmama

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Thanks tabbytom tabbytom ! I'm going to print off your post too. And, hopefully someday before the flowers are finished for the season, I'll be able to post some stunning shots.
 

tabbytom

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Thanks tabbytom tabbytom ! I'm going to print off your post too. And, hopefully someday before the flowers are finished for the season, I'll be able to post some stunning shots.
You're welcome again.

I believe you can succeed.

One thing to do is get a note pad, write down the exposure, shutter speed, ISO settings each time you shoot or just for practice sake, shoot many shots in the combinations of the settings and see the results. This way, you'll see the difference of right and wrong settings and also at the same time, get to know your camera on how it perform.

Once you get over this practice, you know pretty well how to handle the situation with more ease and confidence. I would say that the learning curve will be quite steep if you can't grasp the basic but don't worry, it's not that hard. Don't give up, have any questions, just ask. I'll try my best to help you. Once you clear the hurdle, you'll really enjoy photography.
 
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rubysmama

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I would say that the learning curve will be quite steep if you can't grasp the basic but don't worry, it's not that hard. Don't give up, have any questions, just ask. I'll try my best to help you. Once you clear the hurdle, you'll really enjoy photography.
The learning curve must have a ton of speed bumps and road blocks, LOL, because I just can't seem to get my head around the basics. But I think following your tips, particularly writing things down, that just might help me clear the hurdle.

One thing I did figure out on my own, is that it's better to take flower pics on a cloudy day, than a sunny day. And, of course, when it's not windy. :lol:
 

NY cat man

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The learning curve must have a ton of speed bumps and road blocks, LOL, because I just can't seem to get my head around the basics. But I think following your tips, particularly writing things down, that just might help me clear the hurdle.

One thing I did figure out on my own, is that it's better to take flower pics on a cloudy day, than a sunny day. And, of course, when it's not windy. :lol:
One thing I did was pick up a copy of Senior's Guide to Canon at the local Barnes and Noble bookstore. It explains the functions of the camera better than the Canon manual does, but it isn't cheap- it cost $30 here. I have seen them online if you don't have a bookstore in your area.
 

rubysmama

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One thing I did was pick up a copy of Senior's Guide to Canon at the local Barnes and Noble bookstore. It explains the functions of the camera better than the Canon manual does, but it isn't cheap- it cost $30 here. I have seen them online if you don't have a bookstore in your area.
Amazon has the Kindle version for $8.94, so I think I just may buy it. :)
 

tabbytom

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The learning curve must have a ton of speed bumps and road blocks, LOL, because I just can't seem to get my head around the basics. But I think following your tips, particularly writing things down, that just might help me clear the hurdle.

One thing I did figure out on my own, is that it's better to take flower pics on a cloudy day, than a sunny day. And, of course, when it's not windy. :lol:
Actually it's not that hard. Just don't grasp everything at one go else you get confused. Don't worry, I'm here.
 

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