Seals and Silvers! Kitten Gene Question!

dg25

TCS Member
Thread starter
Young Cat
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
23
Reaction score
5
Hi there!
I’m planning on bringing in a silver shaded chinchilla girl into my small breeding program. My only male is a Seal Point Himmi, and was wondering what their kittens would end up like? I’m hoping for mostly silvers. This silver kittens parents are a silver chinchilla and a seal point himmi as well. I guess my question is, since she’s going to be a colourpoint carrier, will most of the kittens be seal point, or will there still be some silvers in the litter with my himmi and her. Is seal or silver shaded more dominant in this case? Thank you! Wishing you all good health :)
 

lutece

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
4,158
Reaction score
5,292
Since the silver shaded chinchilla female has a seal point (non silver) parent, we know that she carries both colorpoint and solid, and we can assume she is heterozygous for silver (Inhibitor gene)... unless her seal point parent is actually a smoke point :)

We know that your seal point male is homozygous for colorpoint and solid, and I assume he is also non-silver.

So for each kitten in the litter, there should be an equal chance of each of the following colors.
  • 1/8 chance of tabby + non pointed + non silver = brown tabby / golden tabby.
  • 1/8 chance of tabby + non pointed + silver = silver tabby / shaded silver.
  • 1/8 chance of tabby + pointed + non silver = seal lynx point.
  • 1/8 chance of tabby + pointed + silver = (seal) silver lynx point.
  • 1/8 chance of solid + non pointed + non silver = solid black.
  • 1/8 chance of solid + non pointed + silver = black smoke.
  • 1/8 chance of solid + pointed + non silver = seal point.
  • 1/8 chance of solid + pointed + silver = (seal) smoke point.
Note that I'm excluding the possibility of dilute (blue) in the above list... if both parents happen to carry dilute, you could additionally get dilute versions of any of the above colors.
 
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3

dg25

TCS Member
Thread starter
Young Cat
Joined
Apr 23, 2020
Messages
23
Reaction score
5
In order to get mostly silver shaded, would I have to find a female that doesn’t carry CP?
Thank you for your reply! I really appreciate it :)
 

lutece

TCS Member
Top Cat
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
4,158
Reaction score
5,292
Yes, a silver female that doesn't carry colorpoint or solid would give you brown tabbies, golden tabbies / shaded goldens, silver tabbies, and shaded silvers.

You would exclude potential females that had a colorpoint and/or solid parent. Then you could use DNA testing to determine if the prospective female cat carries colorpoint and/or solid.

If you really want to get just silvers (and not brown tabbies, golden tabbies, and shaded goldens), you would also ideally want a female that is homozygous for silver (Inhibitor gene). You can't do a DNA test for silver at this time, unfortunately.

Just remember that all of your kittens will still be carriers of colorpoint and solid, because your male is homozygous for those traits.
 

hortusgirlii

TCS Member
Young Cat
Joined
Jan 4, 2018
Messages
37
Reaction score
26
Hi there!
I’m planning on bringing in a silver shaded chinchilla girl into my small breeding program. My only male is a Seal Point Himmi, and was wondering what their kittens would end up like? I’m hoping for mostly silvers. This silver kittens parents are a silver chinchilla and a seal point himmi as well. I guess my question is, since she’s going to be a colourpoint carrier, will most of the kittens be seal point, or will there still be some silvers in the litter with my himmi and her. Is seal or silver shaded more dominant in this case? Thank you! Wishing you all good health :)
It depends on genetics of the cats. Silver cats can be heterozygous silver ( one copy) or homozygous ( two copies) . If cat has one copy you will get some silvers because it’s a dominant gene. If two copies then all kittens should be silver. Colorpoint must have a gene from both parents, otherwise you will get none. Both parents must either be visual CP , or carry it. It’s a recessive gene if both parents just carry your odds are 25% of litter, If both parents are visual CP 100% of litter would be CP.
 
Top