River the Cat

Is my kitten a Ragdoll

  • Yes

  • No

  • Most likely

  • Definitely not


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Maurey

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She looks similar to a Ragdoll.
People may say that the only Siamese genes to enter the gene pool were ages ago but that does not make sense from a gene perspective. If not reintroduced, genes get washed out.
Plus we all know how people are now and were in the past about spaying and neutering.
I fail to see your point — cats, especially males, cat produce a staggering amount of kittens in just a year. The point gene is recessive, which explains why it’s not super common in street cats, but pops up with some frequency. It’s a 50% chance for a carrier to pass on the gene, per kitten, and a 100% chance for a pointed cat to make more carriers — with how many kittens cats produce in a year, it’s unsurprising that the gene has survived, imo. It’s not like carrying the point gene is something that would make a carrier or pointed cat much less likely to survive that would be actively killing out the gene. It has no real effect, so it could persist indefinitely. The recessive longhair gene certainly doesn’t have any issues sticking around without human/pedigree cat involvement.

Given the rate of occurrence of pointed strays and other moggies, it easily lines up with Siamese spreading the genes decades ago. There are always going to be people who buy BYB pb cats and fail to neuter them (responsible breeders neuter prior to sale to pet homes), but that doesn’t change the fact that a vast majority of pointed cats have almost no structural resemblance (towards distinctive parts of standard) to any of the modern pointed breeds, and, as such, are likely descended from those original Siamese however many decades ago.

I read one account that said the original ragdoll breeder who bred Josephine, a dlh all white cat, did register some solid color (mink) cats as ragdolls. They may be called ragamuffins as well. I am not sure I just read that at one of the links I think.


Mink ragdolls aren’t solid, they’re mink (a colour modifier between sepia and pointed), but they’re also controversial. Neither mink nor solid are accepted in the registries, and they’re typically produced by BYB. Ragamuffins have similar standard (but different head structure), and can come in any colour, however.
 
Last edited:

Meowmee

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I fail to see your point — cats, especially males, cat produce a staggering amount of kittens in just a year. The point gene is recessive, which explains why it’s not super common in street cats, but pops up with some frequency. It’s a 50% chance for a carrier to pass on the gene, per kitten, and a 100% chance for a pointed cat to make more carriers — with how many kittens cats produce in a year, it’s unsurprising that the gene has survived, imo. It’s not like carrying the point gene is something that would make a carrier or pointed cat much less likely to survive that would be actively killing out the gene. It has no real effect, so it could persist indefinitely. The recessive longhair gene certainly doesn’t have any issues sticking around without human/pedigree cat involvement.

Given the rate of occurrence of pointed strays and other moggies, it easily lines up with Siamese spreading the genes decades ago. There are always going to be people who buy BYB pb cats and fail to neuter them (responsible breeders neuter prior to sale to pet homes), but that doesn’t change the fact that a vast majority of pointed cats have almost no structural resemblance (towards distinctive parts of standard) to any of the modern pointed breeds, and, as such, are likely descended from those original Siamese however many decades ago.





Mink ragdolls aren’t solid, they’re mink (a colour modifier between sepia and pointed), but they’re also controversial. Neither mink nor solid are accepted in the registries, and they’re typically produced by BYB. Ragamuffins have similar standard (but different head structure), and can come in any colour, however.
Interesting, what I read at a ragdoll site info about the original line said they were solids. I am going to look at some. I also found one breeder website that was solid rd only, I think I linked it somewhere on this thread, it did not appear to be a byb. Apparently as I mentioned there is some controversy about this due to what happened with the initial breeding. Ty.

Quinn’s breeder did not neuter before he came to me and said to wait until 5 pounds or 6 months my dvm all said and have for many years said 6 months. She has been breeding siamese cats for nearly fifty years and is a responsible breeder. She also will not ship cats which Iiked.
 

Flybynight

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I fail to see your point — cats, especially males, cat produce a staggering amount of kittens in just a year. The point gene is recessive, which explains why it’s not super common in street cats, but pops up with some frequency. It’s a 50% chance for a carrier to pass on the gene, per kitten, and a 100% chance for a pointed cat to make more carriers — with how many kittens cats produce in a year, it’s unsurprising that the gene has survived, imo. It’s not like carrying the point gene is something that would make a carrier or pointed cat much less likely to survive that would be actively killing out the gene. It has no real effect, so it could persist indefinitely. The recessive longhair gene certainly doesn’t have any issues sticking around without human/pedigree cat involvement.

Given the rate of occurrence of pointed strays and other moggies, it easily lines up with Siamese spreading the genes decades ago. There are always going to be people who buy BYB pb cats and fail to neuter them (responsible breeders neuter prior to sale to pet homes), but that doesn’t change the fact that a vast majority of pointed cats have almost no structural resemblance (towards distinctive parts of standard) to any of the modern pointed breeds, and, as such, are likely descended from those original Siamese however many decades ago.





Mink ragdolls aren’t solid, they’re mink (a colour modifier between sepia and pointed), but they’re also controversial. Neither mink nor solid are accepted in the registries, and they’re typically produced by BYB. Ragamuffins have similar standard (but different head structure), and can come in any colour, however.
I really don't se why you think all the mixing was done 'decades ago'? We will just have to disagree on what is logical and what is not.
 
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