Revaccinate in less than a year, is is dangerous?

amethyst

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It likely wont kill her to get a second rabies shot, especially if it is the one year not the 3 year, as you said shelters error on the side of caution and just vaccinate all intakes if they don't know the history. However it does increase the likelihood of things like, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, lethargy, and seizures, as well as over vaccinating increases the risk of injection site cancers.
 

Willowy

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Cats get revaccinated in less than a year all the time. Other than possible reactions (which she probably would have shown the first time), and the inherent risk in any injection for cats (inflammatory response), there shouldn't be any problem. If her body is already immune it should ignore the vaccine, if she isn't fully immune it'll be a reminder for her immune system. My own childhood cats had to get revaccinated in only a few months because our travel papers expired and flying internationally with cats isn't easy. I wouldn't have a problem doing it again under those circumstances.
 

Azazel

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At the very least, ensure that the vet uses a non-adjuvanted vaccine to reduce the risk of injection-site sarcoma. Also, definitely explain the situation to the vet. They will be able to tell you the risks. Don't just solely go off of the advice of folks on a message board.
 

Azazel

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My cat was just vaccinated on Friday and I have the certificate in front of me. It has her age on it. Is is going to be an issue if your certificate says she's 8 months?
Good point... why would the new certificate be any different than the one you already have from 8 months ago?
 
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Willow's Mom

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:hugs:

I am so sorry that this is happening to you. Of course you can have titers done by Hemopet and of course overvaccination is a horrible thing to have to do to someone you love, but you need to hold on to conventional shelter AT ALL COSTS AS LONG AS YOU CAN.

Renters and homeowners become homeless all the time. We don't talk about it much because we want to believe that it can't happen to us.

Sadly, victim blaming and secondary wounding are part of modern life. Please don't internalize it. Your cat needs shelter just as much as you do. You can't take pets into most homeless shelters, so you would be on your own trying to learn unfamiliar skills while in the throws of fresh grief for your old life.

She would most likely wind up getting lost and revaccinated at a shelter anyway. You are better off staying together.

Please spit my own words back into my face when it's my turn. You are very brave.

:grouphug:
 

fionasmom

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While this does not involve a rabies vaccine, my GSD who was a rescue from out of state was vaccinated in the wrong order, and too quickly, in the shelter in which he resided at the time. When he got to CA, my vet looked at the paperwork and said that he had to be revaccinated, which I did because I had a parvo issue once years ago. He was fine.

Having worked with a lot of ferals who were TNRed, I do have to agree with those who are saying that no one ever questions that a cat who has recently been trapped might have had a rabies vaccine someplace along the line. This has included cats who were trapped but evidently had been spayed or neutered previously and then lost or abandoned or just crazy enough to think that a trap looked interesting and walked in.

But as was said, have a very good discussion with your vet about this, and don't take all our words for it.

I went up against LA county once on trying to get a rabies exemption (my vet filed all the paperwork for a good reason) and we lost big time and had to vaccinate, so I do understand the pressure that you are under and hope that you can resolve it.
 
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cookiebun

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Cats get revaccinated in less than a year all the time. Other than possible reactions (which she probably would have shown the first time), and the inherent risk in any injection for cats (inflammatory response), there shouldn't be any problem. If her body is already immune it should ignore the vaccine, if she isn't fully immune it'll be a reminder for her immune system. My own childhood cats had to get revaccinated in only a few months because our travel papers expired and flying internationally with cats isn't easy. I wouldn't have a problem doing it again under those circumstances.
Thank you so much for the reply. You are exactly the sort of person ( with an actual twice vaccinated cat) I was hoping to here from.
 

Azazel

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Thank you so much for the reply. You are exactly the sort of person ( with an actual twice vaccinated cat) I was hoping to here from.
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I can also tell you a story about a cat I knew that got vaccinated too much, ended up with a cancerous tumor, and had to have it removed via surgery. Point being - don’t just look for a one-off person on the internet whose experience supports what you want to hear. Talk to your vet.
 

Willowy

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Cats are inflammatory and prone to injection-site tumors even if they aren't "overvaccinated". One of my mom's cats got a cancerous tumor from just getting her regular kitten shots. Life is all about risk/benefit analyses.

I don't know how honest the OP can be with the vet under the circumstances. But I've found that vets aren't generally too bothered about giving vaccines, no matter how often.
 

Azazel

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Cats are inflammatory and prone to injection-site tumors even if they aren't "overvaccinated". One of my mom's cats got a cancerous tumor from just getting her regular kitten shots. Life is all about risk/benefit analyses.
The more times you get the shot, the more opportunities there are for a reaction. I don’t think it’s bad advice to tell someone to talk to their vet rather than make decisions based on people’s opinions on the internet.

I know you like to disagree with everything I say though. :)
 

Willowy

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I'm not disagreeing with anyone in particular :). I just understand that the OP is in a weird and uncomfortable situation that isn't normal, and just wants to make sure they won't kill their cat.

Yes, asking the vet is always best, but I don't know how honest they can be with the vet at this point, if they're trying to pass the cat off as being older than they really are. So there may be some fudging of details with the vet too.
 

Azazel

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I'm not disagreeing with anyone in particular :). I just understand that the OP is in a weird and uncomfortable situation that isn't normal, and just wants to make sure they won't kill their cat.

Yes, asking the vet is always best, but I don't know how honest they can be with the vet at this point, if they're trying to pass the cat off as being older than they really are. So there may be some fudging of details with the vet too.
Great points, W Willowy :)
 
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