Rethinking Neuter

lucicat

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Spaying and neutering is safe after they hit 2lbs. That's what shelters do. . .I adopted my boy at 9 weeks right after his neuter (literally hours after). I bought pain meds, but it's really a very simple procedure for the boys and I only gave him 1.5 day of the pain meds (he just didn't seem to need them and they made him really lethargic). He wasn't as active for a few days (but he had also just been adopted) and you are supposed to try and keep them from jumping around too wildly for a few days as they heal. It was quick to heal though compared to my girl who we also got at 9 weeks after her spay.

ANyway. . .for all the reasons above please do neuter!

And the shelters here always do blood testing and the microchip at the same time while the kittens are already under.
 

Willowy

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They've done studies and no negative effects were identified in doing it as young as 7 weeks. In cats anyway---neutering large-breed dogs at a young age does have several negative effects. So it all comes down to personal preference.

But yes, testosterone does burn a lot of calories, which is why men can lose weight a lot easier than women can. So once a cat is neutered he'll need less food.
 

MissClouseau

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I know you already decided to neuter (yay!) but just to add for future reference, intact male cats get really aggressive at times. Especially during the mating season. That's why anything that is contagious through blood is more common among male cats - they fight with other male cats, and harass female cats too.

If there is no cat around, some of them still direct their aggression to humans. I saw yet another question on Reddit just the other day someone saying how her intact indoor-only cat is attacking everybody and biting.
 

Antonio65

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the vet said they have a new microchip where they can read his temperature instead of putting the thermometer in the rear.
Can we have some more info about this?

EDIT 1: I have found this
Microchipping cats and dogs with temperature reading
WOW , I want it!

EDIT 2:
On this website
Bio-Thermo microchip
it says
Microchip Temperature is not a replacement for rectal temperature, instead it is a measure which enables an animal’s individual temperature to be monitored very easily over time
Does it means that a rectal temperature reading is always advisable?

EDIT 3:
It seems it's only available in UK and Ireland, so it might not be asked for in my country because the country ID code embedded in the 15-digit number would refer to UK rather than to Italy.
 
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jen

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Just wanted to add that male cats will have little to no issue bouncing back after surgery. There is little pain or discomfort and most act like themselves by the next day. They usually give a pain shot to carry them over and then they are fine. No ongoing pain medication, it is unnecessary. It is hardly cruel, they are under anesthesia for the procedure and by the time they wake up they practically want to play again.
 

GaryT

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stud tail is also an issue. I had one cat I didn't neuter due to health issues. His name was murphy and he was the runt of the litter. He was a red/white Persian. He was not overly aggressive but the stud tail was a mess that I never found anything to cut it. He lived to be 12 years old before he got dry FIP and I had to put him down. I neuter all my cats now.
 

Sylvia Jones

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First let me say I AM an advocate for neutering. However the trend with the 2lb rule gives me pause. In certain cases such as TNR and shelter adoptions the reasoning is clear. But for a responsible cat owner is early neuter Always the ONLY right option? I think it’s important to keep an open mind and especially with medical issues be informed on current research. From reading current veterinarian research and published papers there are legitimate reasons a cat parent may choose a later date for neutering. Some research suggests a year old neutering timeframe. Musculoskeletal development and strength was a big issue along with ligaments and tendons. Also urinary tract development especially in males and the length of the urethra. Which can have many adverse effects. I hope I am not attacked for researching the issue from a current medical perspective. IMHO keeping an open mind to new information and research is how we progress. Making an informed decision for your own situation should not be taken as an attack on current wisdom being practiced in most general population practices.
 

Willowy

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From reading current veterinarian research and published papers there are legitimate reasons a cat parent may choose a later date for neutering.
Do you have a link to those? The ones I've found didn't show any differences.

I think a year is probably pushing it a bit. For those I've waited on, they started to show tomcat behaviors around 9-10 months. So that's about as late as I'd recommend. Far more male cats lose their homes (and lives) due to tomcatty behaviors than who suffer any side effects from neutering.

I don't think it's necessary for a responsible indoor pet owner to neuter their cat at 2 pounds. But a vet can't make that judgement, so it would be irresponsible for the vet not to recommend neutering as early as possible. after that, the pet owner has to make up their own mind. Kittens who go outside should definitely be spayed/neutered by 4-5 months.
 

Neko-chan's mama

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First let me say I AM an advocate for neutering. However the trend with the 2lb rule gives me pause. In certain cases such as TNR and shelter adoptions the reasoning is clear. But for a responsible cat owner is early neuter Always the ONLY right option? I think it’s important to keep an open mind and especially with medical issues be informed on current research. From reading current veterinarian research and published papers there are legitimate reasons a cat parent may choose a later date for neutering. Some research suggests a year old neutering timeframe. Musculoskeletal development and strength was a big issue along with ligaments and tendons. Also urinary tract development especially in males and the length of the urethra. Which can have many adverse effects. I hope I am not attacked for researching the issue from a current medical perspective. IMHO keeping an open mind to new information and research is how we progress. Making an informed decision for your own situation should not be taken as an attack on current wisdom being practiced in most general population practices.
I think it's something every responsible pet parent needs to decide for themselves. I chose to get my girl done at 4.5months. However we live in an apartment and I've seen a couple of cats around. If any are intact males, I didn't want them spraying the perimeter of the building of Neko-chan were to come in heat. If I had a boy cat I might have waited until 7 months.
 

ailish

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I thought it was just so he couldnt have babies and thought it was cruel because of the pain he will feel during recovery. However after reading how it can
I have been a cat parent for only a few years now and I do not have children. I had (still have a little) great anxiety at taking Ailish to the vet because it is obviously very stressful for her. It hurt me to see her so unhappy because of what I was doing. I remind myself that even though it is hard for her, the consequences of NOT maintaining her health and tending to problems as soon as they crop up will make her a lot MORE uncomfortable in the future. No teeth cleaning? Gum disease, abscessed teeth, REAL pain. I tell myself that as a responsible cat parent I just have to suck it up and see that she remains healthy, even at the cost of some momentary discomfort. That works for me when I'm driving out the driveway with a cat in a carrier crying what sounds like, No!, No!
 
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ModernCatLady

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Thank you all so much! He is currently recovering from surgery at the vets office. They have been amazing and have been contacting me to let me know what is happening. He should be ready to be picked up this afternoon. I'm really nervous that he will get an infection or be in pain but I will deal with it if happens. I am in confident in this decision I just keep telling myself the discomfort for him is temporary!
 
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ModernCatLady

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I have been a cat parent for only a few years now and I do not have children. I had (still have a little) great anxiety at taking Ailish to the vet because it is obviously very stressful for her. It hurt me to see her so unhappy because of what I was doing. I remind myself that even though it is hard for her, the consequences of NOT maintaining her health and tending to problems as soon as they crop up will make her a lot MORE uncomfortable in the future. No teeth cleaning? Gum disease, abscessed teeth, REAL pain. I tell myself that as a responsible cat parent I just have to suck it up and see that she remains healthy, even at the cost of some momentary discomfort. That works for me when I'm driving out the driveway with a cat in a carrier crying what sounds like, No!, No!
You are so right! Thank you! This is what is best for him. You sound like a great pet parent your kitty is lucky to have you!
 

verna davies

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He will be fine, little boys bounce back very quickly after neutering. Mine had no pain meds, no collar and acted if nothing had happened. He may be a bit quiet when you bring him home after the anesthetic, on the other hand, you may have to stop him jumping about. Let us know how he is and we'd like a photo.
 
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ModernCatLady

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Hi everyone he is home now. I have a pet playpen that hes had since he was a kitten. Hes in there now. However he keeps walking around in it and standing. Also I had to take away the litterbox because he began to dig in there like crazy and sit in it. Should I confine him in his crate instead but what if he has to pee!
 

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ModernCatLady

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Also he seems to be able to reach the incision when he lifts his back leg. However I dont want to further traumatize him and bring him back to the vet tmrw! What should I do?
 
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ModernCatLady

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One more question LOL. He has not ate or drank anything all day. I have to give him his pain medication (liquid syringe) at 7 pm. Should I give him food around 9 pm? Afraid he will vomit the medicine since he has nothing in his stomach.
 

jefferd18

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They've done studies and no negative effects were identified in doing it as young as 7 weeks. In cats anyway---neutering large-breed dogs at a young age does have several negative effects. So it all comes down to personal preference.

But yes, testosterone does burn a lot of calories, which is why men can lose weight a lot easier than women can. So once a cat is neutered he'll need less food.

Then why are they suggesting that urinary tract infections are more common in male cats who are neutered at a very young age?

And as we all know, those infections, if left untreated, can kill a male cat within 72 hours,
 

verna davies

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He needs to have a litter tray to use. Feed him a little food if he will eat it. By tomorrow the anesthetic should have worn off and he should want food.
 

Willow's Mom

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I have read that you can put shredded newspaper in his litter box for a few days if you are concerned about the risk of infection from the dust.

I have a girl cat and was able to wait until she was six months old to have her spayed. She didn't even seem to notice that she'd had major abdominal surgery.

Pediatric vs traditional spay/neuter is a much bigger issue with dogs, but also controversial and quite worthy of a respectful debate in the appropriate social forum.
 
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