Perplexing behavior in latest rescue

hissy

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I am trying to gain some understanding of a recent stray rescued. After arriving here at my home, her ear flaps were taken off due to squamous cell carcinoma. She came through the surgery pretty good, but I notice when police sirens pass by or the fire station alarm sounds she darts under the furniture and hides until the noise goes away.

My problem with her though is that only after dark, she becomes quite aggressive with the other cats, chasing them, spitting and hissing and swatting at them. I have started using Star of Bethlehem on her, but I just wonder if perhaps she feels vulnerable because she doesnâ€[emoji]8482[/emoji]t have ear flaps? Or am I just over-reaching here and she just needs more time?

I rescue abused and abandoned ferals and have several special needs cats. Currently my clowder numbers 18 they have a large spacious cat enclosure that attaches to our two-story home, so they do all have plenty of room while they are here.
 

catpsych

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Hi!
A cat's ears communicate a lot of their mood and intentions. I'm wondering if what is happening since she has had her ear flaps removed, in the dark it may look as if she has her ears pressed againsted her head to the other cats, which is a sign of aggression or an aggressive body posture. I wonder if at night when your other cats approach her, when they see her it looks as if she is showing aggression, and in defense, they do the same....she doesn't understand why they do and she gives chase???? This is very comon in dogs with cropped ears and docked tails, they have trouble reading each other's body language, which leads to aggression. Just like when us humans try to communicate to someone and we are not communicating well, it leads to a misunderstanding and shortly afterward and full blown argument. I think after time the other cats will get used to her appearance which should lessen the amount of aggression. Also as she ages she won't be so prone to running all over the house at night either. I don't believe you are over reacting at all, just give her some more time.
And kudos on the feral/stray cat rescue!!!! I do the same, I'm so happy when I find other folks doing the same!
Oh yeah, a cool website for cat rescue stuff like shirts and such, is www.CafePress .com type in "cat rescue" in the search bar, they have the coolest stuff! I wear several shirts I got from there to my adoption booths on the weekends. Have a great weekend!
~Kerry


Originally Posted by hissy

I am trying to gain some understanding of a recent stray rescued. After arriving here at my home, her ear flaps were taken off due to squamous cell carcinoma. She came through the surgery pretty good, but I notice when police sirens pass by or the fire station alarm sounds she darts under the furniture and hides until the noise goes away.

My problem with her though is that only after dark, she becomes quite aggressive with the other cats, chasing them, spitting and hissing and swatting at them. I have started using Star of Bethlehem on her, but I just wonder if perhaps she feels vulnerable because she doesnâ€[emoji]8482[/emoji]t have ear flaps? Or am I just over-reaching here and she just needs more time?

I rescue abused and abandoned ferals and have several special needs cats. Currently my clowder numbers 18 they have a large spacious cat enclosure that attaches to our two-story home, so they do all have plenty of room while they are here.
 
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hissy

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Thank you Kerry! I never even thought about that possibility. I know that we have a hard time reading her. This is my first experience with an earless cat. I even realized the other day that I approach her with so much caution most of the time, and she will snap at me (as if to bite me). I wonder if she senses my own hesitation with her and reacts to me this way. It's a learning experience for the whole household that is for sure. She just looks so angry all the time without those ear flaps.

I am currently working on a manuscript about socializing strays and ferals. It would be wonderful to be able to use your expertise on some of the issues within the book.

Thank you again. Hopefully in time, the cats will begin to accept her. We both love her and feel that she has been through enough turmoil in her life, she is here with us to stay.

So does this mean, I just have the ear flaps of all the other cats removed? I'M KIDDING!
 

catpsych

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That sounds wonderful! Also, kudos on the manuscript!
I love it when I meet folks helping out cats, it's so great!

Kerry


Originally Posted by hissy

Thank you Kerry! I never even thought about that possibility. I know that we have a hard time reading her. This is my first experience with an earless cat. I even realized the other day that I approach her with so much caution most of the time, and she will snap at me (as if to bite me). I wonder if she senses my own hesitation with her and reacts to me this way. It's a learning experience for the whole household that is for sure. She just looks so angry all the time without those ear flaps.

I am currently working on a manuscript about socializing strays and ferals. It would be wonderful to be able to use your expertise on some of the issues within the book.

Thank you again. Hopefully in time, the cats will begin to accept her. We both love her and feel that she has been through enough turmoil in her life, she is here with us to stay.

So does this mean, I just have the ear flaps of all the other cats removed? I'M KIDDING!
 
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