October 2021 book of the month club - 2 year anniversary celebration

Mia6

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What book did you read?
Ordinary People
by Judith Guest The story of a family after the death of one of the family members and
how their lives were changed.
Why did you choose it?
I reread it
Were you pleased with your choice?
It was a stand alone book and I read it every so often and enjoy it each time. It was made into a film as well.
What was the format of the book?
Paperback
How did you acquire the book?
I own it.
What did you think of choosing your own book to read this month?
I would like to do it again.
Write a review of the book you read
The tragedy of losing a child and a brother is the focus of the book. Also, the taboo of a parent favoring one child over another.
 

noani

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I think you will enjoy it. It is nothing like the "sword and sorcery" stuff that we think of the fantasy genre as being. It's amazingly down to earth, with believable characters living believable lives, but with the "otherworldly" things mixed in, for the most part.



ANYTHING by de Lint is worth reading. I have not read "The Cats of Tanglewood" yet, but I certainly plan to! The book hasn't been available on Thriftbooks, it's on my Wish List.
I think I too will see if I can get them from library as ebook tomorrow :) left my computer at work so can't check it out today.
 
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rubysmama

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They ALL did!!! I don't know about the health of them after, I'd like to find out. Thanks to Shackleton's leadership and the work and attitude of all, including Shackleton. There are even some pictures in the book.
Oh, that's just amazing! So nice that it had a really happy ending!
I like the shopaholic books as a series, some less, some more. It's a bit repetitive and sometimes Becky can be a bit annoying :flail:
Yeah, Becky can definitely get annoying at times, but I'll still read the next book in the series, if there is one.

My favourites are probably remember me and twenties girl. All her early books as Sophie Kinsella really, and most of what she wrote as Madeleine Wickham too.
Oh, I didn't realize she wrote under another name. Must check those out too.

As far as Jane Green goes, she has been writing for such a long time. Her books have shifted from 20something year olds and their sometimes hilarious shenanigans and just fun stories to kind of more mature stories.
My favourites would be swapping lives, Jemima j and bookends. Everything she wrote between Jemima and second chance.
My library doesn't have *any* of those ones in e-book format, but I will keep her books in mind for when I want something new to read.

ANYTHING by de Lint is worth reading. I have not read "The Cats of Tanglewood" yet, but I certainly plan to! The book hasn't been available on Thriftbooks, it's on my Wish List.
Oh, hope you'll be able to get it soon.

What book did you read?
Ordinary People
by Judith Guest The story of a family after the death of one of the family members and
how their lives were changed.
I've never read the book, but have seen some of the movie, which was very powerful, so I can imagine the book is too.
 

Mia6

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What book did you read?
Ordinary People
by Judith Guest The story of a family after the death of one of the family members and
how their lives were changed.
I've never read the book, but have seen some of the movie, which was very powerful, so I can imagine the book is too.

It is, Rubes.I have both the book and DVD. I like to watch it this time of year because a lot of it was filmed in Lake Forest, Illinois
during autumn. The foliage is beautiful and so is the music. It begins with Pachelbel's Canon in D Minor.
 

Mamanyt1953

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This is such a fun month. I've added a few books to my Kindle list. I tend to buy Kindles for authors I have never read before, as it is an inexpensive way to get to know someone new. Then, if I LOVE LOVE LOVE the book, I will go back and purchase it in print, and add the author to my LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONG list of "collectibles."

Y'all would laugh at my book records. Every author I collect has a computer page in my "Media" file. Every author I collect has a file card for quick reference when ordering. I also have pages and cards for various "MISC" categories. I also keep all of the books on Good Reads, and also on my All My Books program! I love the All My Books, as it has a way of marking which you want, which you have but have not read, and which you have read, as well as rating, and a way to keep up with books you might loan out. Once a year, I go through and make sure everything is caught up, all new books by authors I collect are added, and cross-reference everything. Yeah. I'm a little obsessed. I should have been a librarian, I have the soul of one.
 
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rubysmama

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This is such a fun month. I've added a few books to my Kindle list.
It is fun, isn't it, discovering new books / authors.

Anyone read a book this month? If so, don't forget to post about it.

What about you Boris Diamond Boris Diamond ? Did you ever finish that one you loved when you first read it in school?

And what about you gilmargl gilmargl ? Did you read anything? Or were you too busy with foster kittens?
 

gilmargl

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And what about you gilmargl gilmargl ? Did you read anything? Or were you too busy with foster kittens?
I have just this minute finished reading my chosen book "Walking into the Night" by Olaf Olafsson. One of the foster kittens "Brombear" helped me get through the last 100 pages by falling asleep on my lap - so I had to stay put. :)

What book did you read?
"Walking into the Night" by Olaf Olafsson
A stand alone book. Set in the early twentieth century, the main character is Kristjan Benediktsson, born in Iceland. He escapes his family to work in Copenhagen, moves back to Iceland to marry and have his own family, but then abandons wife and children for a bar dancer in New York. The book starts and ends in the period when he was serving as William Randolph Hearst's butler at San Simeon Castle.

Why did you choose it?
I wanted to read a book written by someone from Iceland. The book, probably bought at a flea market, has been on my bookshelves for years. It will now be recycled at the next book sale at the local library.

Were you pleased with your choice?
I wasn't expecting too much.
It was depressing, so rather difficult to read for a long period at a time.
The book is extremely beautifully written but the main character is morose and weak. In his letters (never posted) to his abandoned wife he is at times defensive and at other times he is almost proud of his callous actions. You don't like him much but at the same time you are always hoping that he will find peace and the freedom he seeks.
I would only recommend it to other readers, if they like a well-written but rather sad story about a very good looking introvert who is attractive to women and also admires and sketches birds.

What was the format of the book?
Paperback

How did you acquire the book?
Bought used

What did you think of choosing your own book to read this month?
Definitely prefer to have the choice announced. If I don't like the chosen book, I can always read something else.

Write a review of the book you read
Sorry - I'm no good at writing reviews
I would give it ⭐⭐⭐⭐
Goodreads Summary
 

Boris Diamond

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This is a tough one to review. I have two opinions, one in the past and one in the present. And much of what I felt back then is somewhat personal and would probably bore people terribly. But here goes.


What book did you read?
Winesburg, Ohio, by Sherwood Anderson

Why did you choose it?
A book I wanted to re-read

Were you pleased with your choice?
I'm glad I read it, but it was kinda boring. The prose was good and the ideas were interesting. Also reading about the experience of small town life in Ohio so many years ago was an education. I can see why so many people left for the big city.

What was the format of the book?
Hardcover

How did you acquire the book?
Already owned it

What did you think of choosing your own book to read this month?
Choosing a book was tough, but I would be happy to do it again. I am reading the other book I considered, Code Blue - Emergency, by James White. So far, a great book! Pedestrian title, but a rather fascinating look at how a gigantic multi-species hospital is run through the eyes of an extremely moral but inexperienced entity from a race that was just discovered. She just cannot fit in. It's fun. The many species of aliens are some of the most imaginative creations I have seen in many years of reading Sci-Fi.

Write a review of the book you read
Winesburg,Ohio is a series of short pieces about the different people who live in the imaginary town of Winesburg, OH, in the late 1800's. There is one character whose story intertwines. In a small Midwest town at that time, they are not exposed to much. These characters obsess on what they have and few find happiness. I don't think there is a truly happy, fulfilling or satisfying ending in the lot. It is very well written with some beautiful prose, but it is repetitive. An unhappy person. Check. An unhappy preacher who hates himself for his obsession with sex. Check. Yet another unhappy person, one who dreams of leaving town. Check. And yet another unhappy person who does leave town. Were there no happy people at that time in small town Midwestern USA? It was interesting to see the insight into the way the people handled their lives and how social interaction happened. Since Winesburg, Ohio is based on the author's home town and his experiences growing up, I assume it is accurate in it's portrayal of small town life at that time.

In the introduction of this book, an old man talks about truth - "Hundreds and hundreds were the truths and they were all beautiful.

And then the people came along. Each as he appeared snatched up one of the truths and some who were quite strong snatched up a dozen of them.

It was the truths that made the people grotesques."

The old man's theory was that when person took a truth and made it his own, it made him a grotesque and the truth became a falsehood.

At the time I first read this book, I was around some people who, I believed, were affected in this manner. They had seized on one truth or idea and stuck to it through thick and thin. They had found some success this way, but the one truth they were holding onto was limiting their ability to grow past a certain point. While grotesque may be too strong a word, the truth they were holding onto was keeping them from developing. One of the reasons I have seen businesses fail is that the owner cannot change from his truth, doubtless a good truth in many ways, but not successful in a changing situation.

Holding on too tight to one truth can make a person narrow-minded, keeping a person from changing.

For the prose and the ideas it stimulated in me, less the repetitive nature of the book, I will give three stars out of five. 💮💮💮
 
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Mamanyt1953

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Boris Diamond Boris Diamond , I love that quote, and I have known people who chose a truth and would not move from it...I agree with your thoughts on them. It can stunt a life. Or, as my dad once said, when my mother told him, "Don't rock the boat," "Honey, real boats rock. The ones that don't have either run aground or sunk."

I am reading the other book I considered, Code Blue - Emergency, by James White. So far, a great book! Pedestrian title, but a rather fascinating look at how a gigantic multi-species hospital is run through the eyes of an extremely moral but inexperienced entity from a race that was just discovered.
AND I add another book to the list!!! Added, and is available through Thriftbooks! It will be on my next order!
 
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rubysmama

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One of the foster kittens "Brombear" helped me get through the last 100 pages by falling asleep on my lap - so I had to stay put. :)
Awwww.... precious. :catlove:

What book did you read?
"Walking into the Night" by Olaf Olafsson

[snip]

I would only recommend it to other readers, if they like a well-written but rather sad story about a very good looking introvert who is attractive to women and also admires and sketches birds.
I'd think that would be a very small window of potential readers. ;)

The book, probably bought at a flea market, has been on my bookshelves for years. It will now be recycled at the next book sale at the local library.
Well, at least you accomplished finally reading. So congrats, on that. :thumbsup:

What book did you read?
Winesburg, Ohio, by Sherwood Anderson

[snip]

I'm glad I read it, but it was kinda boring. The prose was good and the ideas were interesting. Also reading about the experience of small town life in Ohio so many years ago was an education. I can see why so many people left for the big city.
Probably not a surprise that your opinion on it is so different from the first reading. But glad you had the chance to read it again.

I am reading the other book I considered, Code Blue - Emergency, by James White. So far, a great book! Pedestrian title, but a rather fascinating look at how a gigantic multi-species hospital is run through the eyes of an extremely moral but inexperienced entity from a race that was just discovered. She just cannot fit in. It's fun. The many species of aliens are some of the most imaginative creations I have seen in many years of reading Sci-Fi.
I'm not really much of a sci-fi fan, but that one sounds interesting.
 

Boris Diamond

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AND I add another book to the list!!!
I'm not really much of a sci-fi fan, but that one sounds interesting.
`

Be warned that the book was written in 1987 and as one reviewer said, "...dated in their treatment of human gender relations." Though the patriarchalism is criticized by the female characters in the book, it is still there. I'm still enjoying the book. If you read it, I hope you enjoy it too, despite it's faults.
 

Tobermory

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What book did you read?
The Madness of Crowds, by Louise Penny, a Canadian author. It's the most recent (2021) in her Chief Inspector Armand Gamache murder mystery series. They're set in Three Pines in the province of Quebec--or, at least, that's home base even if the characters leave it. These are not cozy mysteries!

Why did you choose it?
The Madness of Crowds is the 17th in the series. I've read all of the others and have been on the waiting list for this newest one. I like her books. The characters are intelligent and interesting, some quite quirky. They've grown throughout the series. Murder is grim, but I'd live in Three Pines with these people in a heartbeat. These people clearly all love and support each other, even though they may disagree.

Were you pleased with your choice?
Absolutely. Louise Penny is an excellent writer and has crafted a great group of characters.

Was it as good as you expected or a disappointment?
I thought it was as good as her others although the underlying theme of this one was difficult. It went far beyond the murders themselves. More below...

Was it a fast read or a challenge to get to the end?
I'm a fast reader, but this one took me a bit longer than usual. Not a challenge to get to the end, but serious with a lot going on.

Would you recommend it to other readers?
I would, but I'd suggest starting with the first one. The characters grow personally and in their relationships with others. You could read this one as a standalone, but you might be confused by references to events that happened in previous books. And you'd be missing some of the background that explains the richness of the characters.

If part of a series, do you plan to read the next one?
Oh, yes. Can't wait!

What was the format of the book?
It was an e-book from the library.

What did you think of choosing your own book to read this month? Would you like to do this again, on occasion? Or do you prefer to have the choice announced, and everyone read the same book? I haven't participated before, but I think having everyone "report" on a different book occasionally is interesting.

Write a review of the book you read.
I'm going to be cryptic because I don't want to reveal too much about the underlying theme of the book. Louise Penny takes a fairly long time to get to it although I had a pretty good idea what was going on as I got into it. She wrote this book during the pandemic, and it's set immediately post-pandemic. People are re-emerging after a difficult period and rejoicing in their ability to be together. But the key is in the title: The Madness of Crowds. The author uses what she observed during the pandemic about how groups of people responded to the virus. How far are we willing to go to keep ourselves safe both economically and physically? It actually made me think of the WWII book by Kristin Harmel that I just finished, The Forest of Vanishing Stars, and the treatment of Polish Jews.
 
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rubysmama

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The Madness of Crowds, by Louise Penny, a Canadian author. It's the most recent (2021) in her Chief Inspector Armand Gamache murder mystery series. They're set in Three Pines in the province of Quebec-
Another Canadian author with a book series set in Canada, that I've never heard of.

The characters are intelligent and interesting, some quite quirky. They've grown throughout the series. Murder is grim, but I'd live in Three Pines with these people in a heartbeat. These people clearly all love and support each other, even though they may disagree.
Even though I posted in the general reading thread I wouldn't be adding this series to my "to read" list, maybe I will after all, as your above description makes it sound very appealing.

I haven't participated before, but I think having everyone "report" on a different book occasionally is interesting.
I think the idea of everyone reading and "reporting" on a different book was a success. Glad you posted about your read. Hopefully in an upcoming month, we'll be reading a book that might interest you, so you can join us again.
 
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rubysmama

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1635681189038.png

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This has been such a fun month, with everyone reading and posting about a different book. Wish it could go on a bit longer, but today is October 31st, and our November book of the month is waiting in the wings, so our "read anything you want" month is going to have to end. But since it went so well, I'm almost positive we'll be doing it again.

Although all books that were read have already been reviewed upthread by their respective reader, thought it might be helpful to make a list with just the titles and authors. Note that some members are avid readers, and read more than one book.

verna davies -
Local Woman Missing by Mary Kubica
strider rose - Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Harry Potter, #3) by J K Rowlings
pearl99 - Housebroken by Laurie Notaro.
pearl99 - Endurance by Alfred Lansing,
rubysmama - The Paris Dressmaker by Kristy Cambron
Lari - The Color of Magic (Discworld, #1; Rincewind, #1) by Sir Terry Pratchett
Lola3791 - Greenwood Michael Christie
Mamanyt1953 - Moonheart by Charles de Lint
Mamanyt1953 - Spiritwalk by Charles de Lint
Mia6 - Ordinary People by Judith Guest
gilmargl - Walking Into the Night Olaf Olafsson
Boris Diamond -
Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson
Boris Diamond -
Code Blue, Emergency by James White.
Tobermory -
The Madness Of Crowds by Louise Penny

This month would not have been a success without the participation of our fellow readers, so thank you to all of you who helped us celebrate our book club's 2nd anniversary.

Those of you who joined in for the first time, it was great seeing the types of books you read. Hope to see you again during one of our regular months.

November will see us returning to the genre of thrillers, when we read Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
November 2021 book of the month club

And December will see us doing a shorter month, with a shorter read. The thread with all the details will be posted in early November, so stay tuned.
 
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