New neighbor's dog hates cats - but my cat wants her harness-walks!

Ijhannah

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I live in a condo and my new neighbor has a dog. It's an old couple who already talks to others with "I'm old so I'm entitled" type of tones from what my neighbors tell me. They seemed nice when I ran into them after they moved in but they do come across as very nosy type.

Today, I harness walked my cat as usual and she was on the other side of the walkway with her dog. I ignored them but did notice that she was eyeing us across the parking lot. She kind of made some circles (I guess waiting for us to move away from the stairway). As you know, cats go where they want, when they want so I just stood there waiting for her to start walking. When she saw that we were going nowhere she stated to me that she needs to get to her unit and that her dog hates cats. I didn't respond and tried to finagle my cat into walking the opposite direction to which she didn't want to have anything to do with so I picked her up. This upset her (cat) and she started letting out an annoyed meow followed by growls. After this, it set a chain reaction of her being irritated to a point where when we got back inside, I couldn't even get the harness off her because she was so mad.

For those who walk their cats - what would you recommend I do when this happens again? My cat is the type that wants to do what she wants, when she wants. I feel that the neighbor's not at fault that her dog hates cats, but I feel that now I have to accommodate to their dog's needs and confirm that her dog is not outside when I bring her out. I wanted to tell this lady that I've walked my cat here w/out any issues with other neighbors until they moved in and if she can't handle her dog's behavior while she's out, she needs to utilize her patio door to go in/out and stay out of our sight. Am I the A****** for wanting to tell her off?

I don't get confrontational until someone pushes my buttons but because it involves my cat, this is now making me a little pissed off because I feel like we now have to walk on egg-shells because of them.
 

maggie101

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I don't let my cats outside but how do you know the dog does not like cats or if the cat does not like dogs? What time of day does she walk her dog? Can you walk her some somewhere else? I assume the dog is on a leash.
 
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Ijhannah

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I don't let my cats outside but how do you know the dog does not like cats or if the cat does not like dogs? What time of day does she walk her dog? Can you walk her some somewhere else? I assume the dog is on a leash.
The lady basically said "I need to get to my unit and my dog hates cats". I can always try to walk her somewhere else, but I just find it annoying that I have to give in to accommodate to their needs. It's not like my cat lashes out or attacks dogs walking nearby.
 

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It might be good to let her know that your cat hates being forced to go in a specific direction, and you can't really make her. So if her dog really hates cats maybe she should either pick him up to get past you or hold tight until your cat is ready to move or you could share numbers and text one another to offset your walking times. Don't hold in your feelings on this, politely share your concerns and options, then agree on a compromise together. Good luck!
 

di and bob

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I agree with the above, ask her to pick up her dog or keep it tightly in control. If you meet, ask her to move, tell her cats cannot be made to go where they don't want to go. I pray she will always have that animal leashed. You might inform her of the approx. times you walk your cat. SHE is the one who moved in and is new, so she should accommodate you. It would annoy me too, that she expected YOU to move, she should have waited until you could move safely out of the way, or went another way. I would NEVER pick up my cat with a dog around, that means the cat would feel confined and trapped and would lash out or panic. She obviously doesn't know cats very well or doesn't care......PS you could ask her to move a little closer so your cat would be convinced to go, I can't imagine a cat just standing there when a dog is approaching, and if it does a little pulling might convince it to move.
 

game misconduct

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you cant blame the old lady for your cats reaction after you got home its not her fault.she also gave you fair warning her dog doesnt like cats (its probably one of those yappy kind that wants to run up and bark etc,)you should just work out a time with her that works for both of you cause just as a dog owner is responsible for their dogs behavior while out on walks a cat owner should be held to the same standards
 

vansX2

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I live in a condo and my new neighbor has a dog. It's an old couple who already talks to others with "I'm old so I'm entitled" type of tones from what my neighbors tell me. They seemed nice when I ran into them after they moved in but they do come across as very nosy type.

Today, I harness walked my cat as usual and she was on the other side of the walkway with her dog. I ignored them but did notice that she was eyeing us across the parking lot. She kind of made some circles (I guess waiting for us to move away from the stairway). As you know, cats go where they want, when they want so I just stood there waiting for her to start walking. When she saw that we were going nowhere she stated to me that she needs to get to her unit and that her dog hates cats. I didn't respond and tried to finagle my cat into walking the opposite direction to which she didn't want to have anything to do with so I picked her up. This upset her (cat) and she started letting out an annoyed meow followed by growls. After this, it set a chain reaction of her being irritated to a point where when we got back inside, I couldn't even get the harness off her because she was so mad.

For those who walk their cats - what would you recommend I do when this happens again? My cat is the type that wants to do what she wants, when she wants. I feel that the neighbor's not at fault that her dog hates cats, but I feel that now I have to accommodate to their dog's needs and confirm that her dog is not outside when I bring her out. I wanted to tell this lady that I've walked my cat here w/out any issues with other neighbors until they moved in and if she can't handle her dog's behavior while she's out, she needs to utilize her patio door to go in/out and stay out of our sight. Am I the A****** for wanting to tell her off?

I don't get confrontational until someone pushes my buttons but because it involves my cat, this is now making me a little pissed off because I feel like we now have to walk on egg-shells because of them.
I feel for You. I as well live in a Condo. Fortunately I'm the President and Treasurer of the Association . Most Of my neighbors Even the dog owners are no problem . Does Your Condo Association have any specific rules about pets? We have weight restriction and size. Originally our rules said only 1 pet. But since I have become President I have relaxed that.
 

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I live in a condo and my new neighbor has a dog. It's an old couple who already talks to others with "I'm old so I'm entitled" type of tones from what my neighbors tell me. They seemed nice when I ran into them after they moved in but they do come across as very nosy type.

Today, I harness walked my cat as usual and she was on the other side of the walkway with her dog. I ignored them but did notice that she was eyeing us across the parking lot. She kind of made some circles (I guess waiting for us to move away from the stairway). As you know, cats go where they want, when they want so I just stood there waiting for her to start walking. When she saw that we were going nowhere she stated to me that she needs to get to her unit and that her dog hates cats. I didn't respond and tried to finagle my cat into walking the opposite direction to which she didn't want to have anything to do with so I picked her up. This upset her (cat) and she started letting out an annoyed meow followed by growls. After this, it set a chain reaction of her being irritated to a point where when we got back inside, I couldn't even get the harness off her because she was so mad.
It was rude to not respond to your neighbor and very uncooperative. If things had gone sideways, the lack of communication could have endangered humans and and animals alike.

For those who walk their cats - what would you recommend I do when this happens again? My cat is the type that wants to do what she wants, when she wants. I feel that the neighbor's not at fault that her dog hates cats, but I feel that now I have to accommodate to their dog's needs and confirm that her dog is not outside when I bring her out. I wanted to tell this lady that I've walked my cat here w/out any issues with other neighbors until they moved in and if she can't handle her dog's behavior while she's out, she needs to utilize her patio door to go in/out and stay out of our sight. Am I the A****** for wanting to tell her off?
To be blunt, yes you were the A******. It wasn't the other person's fault you didn't respond to their attempt to communicate and your judgement of "I'm old so I'm entitled" based on gossip is unwarranted. Old people aren't old from being stupid. They're old because they survived being stupid which means they've learned a thing or two.

You don't want to change your routine to accomodate your neighbor, but you want her to change hers to accomodate you. Ok, no one can force you.

But you do need to take steps to ensure your cat's safety and security. Picking up your cat to clear a path for your neighbor was not only the right thing to do, it was the safest for your cat. I'd rather have my cat get angry for picking her up than risk having her panic and slip the harness.

What can it hurt to change your routine to keep your cat in hand, or in a carrier, until you can make sure it's safe to take your cat outside? Or carry her to a safe place before setting her down for her walk? Unsuccessfully trying to finagle your cat, then having it growl and hiss when you picked it up says you had no control over your cat.

I don't get confrontational until someone pushes my buttons but because it involves my cat, this is now making me a little pissed off because I feel like we now have to walk on egg-shells because of them.
You don't have to walk on eggshells. Just get to know your neighbor better because you should-
Make friends with her so you can count on each other if help is needed
Maggie gave the best advice in the whole thread.
 
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Tik cat's mum

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I don't think your neighbour was being unreasonable. It sounds like she wanted to get inside but had to get past you and your cat to do so. You would of been more upset if she would of tried to walk past and the dog attacked your cat. At least she told you the dog doesn't like cat's. Could you carry your cat just a little way from the stairway to start the walk. I think the problem was your neighbour was afraid of the dog going for the cat if your neighbour picked up the dog it might of reacted like your cat did. You should talk and come to a compromise. You never know she might of even thought if the dog got near the cat barking that your cat might use claws on the dog. It could of ended badly for dog and cat.
 

Flybynight

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I agree both parties being considerate helps. You cannot expect her to wait outside till your cat decides to leave.

If her dog is leashed, then I would clear the way to let her go by. Or is there an alternative stairway she could use for times when both the dog and cat would be passing each other?

If her dog is not leashed then I would talk to her in a polite way about that. Is the stairwell large enough for her to pass you with her dog safely? I would be more worried if the dog was loose. Again the issue may have been she did not want her dog to bark and scare your cat.
 

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All you need to say is something like, "Gimme' a sec... Walking a cat isn't the same as walking a dog..."
Then, of course, do the best you can to coax your cat out of the other peoples' path.

I get it. You're trying to manage your own affairs, manage your cat and watch out for other people and dangerous things when somebody comes along with a dog. It isn't easy but you need to let the other person know that you know they are there and that you're not just lollygagging.

However, when somebody says, "My dog hates cats," you know that's 90% bull. Virtually no dog "hates" cats unless its humans have taught it to hate cats. You would certainly have the right to respond by saying something like, "The last dog that tried to start a fight with my cat ended up with bloody claw marks across its nose!"

At this point, you should go pick up the cat and make like you're trying to "protect" their dog from your cat.

If your cat puts up a fuss about being picked up, go ahead and make a show of it! ;) ;) ;)
 

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I would do a few things. Kindly tell the dog owner they are responsible for their dog and that if your cat gets injured from her dog- she will be held liable for the vet bills. I would also ask her (in it might be best if our pets never meet again) what time she walks her dog so your kitty can be outside during different times. (I constantly ask my neighbor if her cat Dora is out because she wants to kick my cat’s behind!) Maybe make a joke about how walking a cat is like walking a toddler that stops to look at things for a few minutes every few steps! Maybe mention how well her dog walks!

Lastly maybe carry an air horn or bear mace just in case of an attack to protect your cat from the dog. You might want to mention to your neighbor that you will be carrying it because though it would burn both pet’s noses it is better than death or maiming! If need be talk to your apartment manager.

It is her job to control her dog! That said some breeds have higher prey drives. Like my mom’s cocker spaniel puppies! If a cat runs, they chase. But we are working on training the puppies!!! Ironically my scaredy cat wants to stalk 10 feet behind the old blind dash hound in my complex! I call him on it & stop him though!
 

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Lastly maybe carry an air horn or bear mace just in case of an attack to protect your cat from the dog.
There's a TikTok challenge- set off an airhorn while holding your cat! :angrycat:

The neighbor lady doesn't need to be told off. She kept her dog away from the cat and waited until the cat was removed from the scene. She made no threats. She only warned that her dog hates (ie doesn't do well with) cats.

The best way to protect your cat while walking it on a leash from other critters is to pick it up. Airhorns and bear spray will only serve to panic the animals involved. Bear spray will cause blindness and swollen nasal passages in the cat, the dog and any humans involved- including yourself- and there will be panic. The cat will escape the harness unable to breathe, smell or see while in great pain. At least with the airhorn, the cat will only be panicked and deafened.
 

danteshuman

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I didn’t know that about bear spray! My first thought was pepper spray but same problem with maybe blinding the animals. I would try the air horn first if the need arose. I would still take your worst case scenario (with regular mace) over a big dog getting a hold of my cat!

Thank goodness my cat goes limp when I carry him belly up in my arms! I had a cat get me a bit & try to climb me to get to my cat in my arms. Since then I like to keep a good 10-20 feet between the longest range of both leashes & I’m always on Dora alert. The worst my cat does is growl at me as I carry him away from the front area he views as her turf. He stopped wanting to go up to the front yard area. Luckily the humans seem to distract the cats & I have my neighbors phone number. So the time I saw her kitty on the loose looking in my sliding glass door, I could text her.
 

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Kindly tell the dog owner they are responsible for their dog...
I agree but my response, above, was meant to convey the same thing in a more subtle way.

Let's use an imaginary situation.
Imagine that you are walking down the street, minding your own business, when some unsavory looking character walks up to you.
You could say, "Stay away from me! I have a gun!"

Sure! That'll work but it could escalate the situation. What if the other guy has a gun, too?! Bad things could happen!

What if you were wearing an N.R.A. tee shirt? What if you pretended to ignore the "bad guy" but subtly made sure that he saw your shirt? He'd probably get the idea that you're not the kind of person to mess around with.

My idea was to quietly point out that the other person's dog might not like cats but, if it tries to attack your cat, things won't go well for the dog, either.

It is quite common for even the most mild mannered cat to take a piece out of a dog when attacked.

I agree that it is every pet owner's responsibility to be in control of their animal whether it be dog, cat or anything else. The party who does not uphold that responsibility is on the hook to pay for any damages that their animal causes.

With my idea, you would be just "underlining" that fact but with a smile on your face. ;)

There's a TikTok challenge- set off an airhorn while holding your cat! :angrycat:
Just when you thought that YouTube was the stupidest thing in the world... Then comes TikTok! :rolleyes:
 

Cat McCannon

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Let's use an imaginary situation.
Imagine that you are walking down the street, minding your own business, when some unsavory looking character walks up to you.
You could say, "Stay away from me! I have a gun!"
This isn't a good analogy. First, a gun is an inanimate object. It's not gonna jump off it's leash and attack a cat.

Second, anyone who goes around telling others "Stay away, I've got a gun" has serious issues and will soon be expaining them to the police.

This situation is more like "My grandson with autism hates cats and may go into a rage and I'd like to get him inside without drama."

To be fair, I added a bit to the monologue. Still, it's the same thing. "Dog hates cats. I'd like to get inside without drama. Move your cat for his protection."

Third, how does the neighbor lady fall into the category of unsavory character?

My idea was to quietly point out that the other person's dog might not like cats but, if it tries to attack your cat, things won't go well for the dog, either.
Like queitly pointing out you have a gun.

Nothing in the original narrative indicated the neighbor lady threatened the cat with the dog or made any other kind of threats.

Just when you thought that YouTube was the stupidest thing in the world... Then comes TikTok! :rolleyes:
LOL! That's what happens when people are insulated from the consequences of their actions.
 

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I didn’t know that about bear spray! My first thought was pepper spray but same problem with maybe blinding the animals. I would try the air horn first if the need arose. I would still take your worst case scenario (with regular mace) over a big dog getting a hold of my cat!
Bear spray is pepper spray in an economy sized package. Pepper spray, mace, tear gas all cause mucous membranes and soft tissues to swell up and excrete mucous. Tear gas also triggers vomiting. All ar every painful Now, imagine what happens inside your cat's head when it's hit with pain, blindness and robbed of breath and smell. Imagine what your options are while only having one arm to deal with your cat and possibly affected by the back spray.

Using an airhorn is no better. Do you know how loud and piercing they are? Like the siren of a firetruck.

Have you ever had to hold a panicking cat in your arms as firetrucks rush past? I have.

When I was young and dumb, a friend took me to see a litter of kittens who needed homes. I picked out a beautiful black cat with bright yellow eyes and named him Grendl. We didn't have a cat carrier and the idea of placing him in a sack bothered me. On the way home, my friend wanted to stop to buy some 55 gallon water drums. I didn't want to leave Grendl alone in the truck and didn't want to take him into the store. It was summer and too hot to sit in the truck, so I got out and sat against the building wall in the shade holding Grendl in my arms and petting him. He was alert but relaxed.

Suddenly, three fire vehicles hit their sirens on the way to some incident. Grendl panicked. He clawed at my chest trying to get away and the sound of the sirens was excruciating. I needed to cover my ears, but I knew if I let him go, I'd never see him again. I squished him tightly to my chest so he couldn't claw and held on to him for his life.

That's what's going to happen if you blast an airhorn near your cat. It will panic and unless held tightly in your arms, will slip the harness and disapear in a flash. However, since you needed one hand to blast the airhorn, you have only one hand free.

The best way to protect your cat is to think like a cat- a human sized cat. Look for danger before going out the door. Keep your head on a swivel and stay alert for developing situations and stay ahead of them. Look for escape routes. Avoid "traffic jams". Have a plan for scooping up your cat and getting away from danger. Don't be a tyrant, but let your cat know YOU are in charge. Yes, we like to joke cats run our lives, but not during an emergency.

Never forget- The best part about being a cat guardian is having the scars from tooth and claw to prove it.
 

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You did not mention the theoretical age of the neighbor or their physical condition or the breed of dog. I am guessing that since this is a condo and there may be restrictions, it is not a Cane Corso or wolf hybrid. However, even a small dog who breaks off a leash can injure a cat. My neighbors own a rehomed Pomeranian who killed the (previous) family's cat.

I think that you need to consider the safety of your cat first of all, imagine the cat's reaction if the dog did approach, and plan accordingly from there. Trying to find a common ground with this couple and possibly being sociable will help.

As a lifelong dog owner, way before cats ever came into my life and mostly GSDs, I have to say that the dog does not "hate" cats. The dog has a high prey drive which has not been worked with, or is simply not that well trained. I agree that anyone who goes out in public with a dog should be responsible for their behavior.
 

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OK I take the bear mace & pepper spray back!

There have been 3 times where I put my self between my cat & potential attacking animal (& 1 where the cat was trying to attack me.) All I did was calmly stand there between them. In each case there were many feet between the animal & my cat. The raccoons just postured then walked away. The pit bull that ran into the my yard and chased my cat up a 8 foot concrete wall was the most frightening but she just wanted to play with my cat (high prey drive!) I was able to gently shoo her out of the yard (the backyard lacked a side gate at the time) and then pry my cat off the top of the wall to safely bring him inside. The first bloody encounter with the cat Dora where I was walking away from her out of the range of her leash (I have some scars on the back of one leg from her!) The second encounter with Dora my cat got loose, she was leashed and I just got between them and clapped my hands (allowing my naughty wuss to run home & be safely put back in his harness.) In all those scenarios I tried to stay calm and project more of a pack mentality. Like I saying “look I don’t want t, I want to just go on my way but if you attack my boy I will have to defend him. Can we please just go out separate ways?”

Since a human is taller than most animals this worked in my case. I later learned that the pit bull was a sweetheart just with a very high prey drive & her owners let her run around the block without a leash. (Afterwards I told them she was in our yard chasing my cat & they kept her on leash.) Really all I saw was a small blur followed by a larger blur race across the backyard and I went out to investigate.

I have no idea how you could break apart even a small dog and a cat if they were fighting short of startling them. Which is why I suggested an air horn. Becuase it would frighten both animals enough to hopefully stop and run in opposite directions. A dog can kill a cat in seconds! My mom’s cat lost half his tail by climbing from her small tree into a neighbors small tree..... & their husky trying to pull him from the tree by his tail! (The vet had to amputate half his injured tail.) So that is why I view dogs as such a danger!

I still think the best solution is working out different hours to take your pet out. Like they get 5-6 pm & you get 6-7 pm. 🤷🏻‍♀️

Luckily my apartment complex has a leash rule, all pets must be on a leash. So I just keep an eye on my cat & make sure their dogs are kept at least 15 feet from my cat. When in doubt I just bring him inside for a few minutes and then let him back out. Every time I see my neighbor out I ask her (from a good distance!) if the cat Dora is out to. If she says yes, I just turn around & walk my cat back. No need for those cats to even get near each other!
 
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