My most difficult adoption

merlinsmom

Mom to Moose, Squirrel, Dougie, Betty and Ferals
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Thank you. I know its probably best for them in the long run, but I always worry about who will get them. My husband says its still better than leaving them outside. sigh
 

merlinsmom

Mom to Moose, Squirrel, Dougie, Betty and Ferals
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Thanks. Me too. I hated to have him be alone without one of his siblings, but keeping two is really pushing it
 

merlinsmom

Mom to Moose, Squirrel, Dougie, Betty and Ferals
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You think 4 boys will be an issue? The little one is a boy. The other that is attached to me is a girl. But she is boisterous and outgoing and will have no trouble attaching to someone.
 
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Zara12345

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I know this is an old post, but I am getting ready to go through with this. I have four of my own already, but I am fostering 4 babies right now that will be going to the shelter to adopt this week. I had 5 and one has gone to his home and is so happy and getting all the pets and attention. There are two that are pretty attached to me and one is very quiet and reserved. I am not an official cat foster mom. These were kittens that were born in my back yard and I've been in their lives almost since they were big enough to walk up to us. I keep getting mixed signals from those around me. My husband would be ok with a new face or two, but I don't know about my other cats and my father (he doesn't live with us) things I"m nuts. Luckily my husband will take them for me, so I can say goodbye at home. I am just a mess and keep crying at work. Ugh, I'm not made for this for sure.
Hi dear. I completely understand your pain. I am also not an official rescuer/fosterer. In fact, it's also something that "just happened" to me. In your case its kittens that you rescued from your back yard. Perhaps this will help; from the few months of fostering that I have done, I always go through these stages of emotions: firstly, I am almost always torn between whether to accept the kitten or not; it's a debate between logical and emotional reasoning. I am almost always occupied with work but there's also no way that I am ever able to refuse a baby that needs me especially if I have the space to keep him. From then onwards its nurturing the kitten and its at this point where we get attached as we get to know these babies and watch as they grow into their personalities and develop peculiar habits that distinguishes them from the others. Letting go is the hardest part. Admittedly, it's hard; it takes a toll on your emotions. The days prior to adoption and the days following the adoption can be most difficult; some kittens are a lot harder than others to let go while others are a bit easier. The best part, however is when you know that your baby is doing well in his new home.❤❤❤ Personally, I NEED that closure otherwise I am restless without knowing how the baby is doing and if he is adjusting well to his environment. So my advice is this: Get in touch with the people that adopted these kittens. Find out how they're doing... ask for videos, not just pictures and keep in touch. It may seem like the pain will never go away but it will once you know your babies are OK- then you're OK. For lack of a better term to explain it, it's almost like a chapter complete with a happy ending.
 

Margot Lane

Kitten at heart, not a Top Cat
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Hi dear. I completely understand your pain. I am also not an official rescuer/fosterer. In fact, it's also something that "just happened" to me. In your case its kittens that you rescued from your back yard. Perhaps this will help; from the few months of fostering that I have done, I always go through these stages of emotions: firstly, I am almost always torn between whether to accept the kitten or not; it's a debate between logical and emotional reasoning. I am almost always occupied with work but there's also no way that I am ever able to refuse a baby that needs me especially if I have the space to keep him. From then onwards its nurturing the kitten and its at this point where we get attached as we get to know these babies and watch as they grow into their personalities and develop peculiar habits that distinguishes them from the others. Letting go is the hardest part. Admittedly, it's hard; it takes a toll on your emotions. The days prior to adoption and the days following the adoption can be most difficult; some kittens are a lot harder than others to let go while others are a bit easier. The best part, however is when you know that your baby is doing well in his new home.❤❤❤ Personally, I NEED that closure otherwise I am restless without knowing how the baby is doing and if he is adjusting well to his environment. So my advice is this: Get in touch with the people that adopted these kittens. Find out how they're doing... ask for videos, not just pictures and keep in touch. It may seem like the pain will never go away but it will once you know your babies are OK- then you're OK. For lack of a better term to explain it, it's almost like a chapter complete with a happy ending.
Thank you for writing this, as veterinarians are closing up shop anywhere near me…if I want to continue to have a cat in my future life, I will either have to volunteer to TNR or foster. I have always wondered how you manage to let them go and now I understand. This is very helpful.
 

merlinsmom

Mom to Moose, Squirrel, Dougie, Betty and Ferals
Adult Cat
Joined
Nov 9, 2012
Messages
106
Purraise
75
Hi dear. I completely understand your pain. I am also not an official rescuer/fosterer. In fact, it's also something that "just happened" to me. In your case its kittens that you rescued from your back yard. Perhaps this will help; from the few months of fostering that I have done, I always go through these stages of emotions: firstly, I am almost always torn between whether to accept the kitten or not; it's a debate between logical and emotional reasoning. I am almost always occupied with work but there's also no way that I am ever able to refuse a baby that needs me especially if I have the space to keep him. From then onwards its nurturing the kitten and its at this point where we get attached as we get to know these babies and watch as they grow into their personalities and develop peculiar habits that distinguishes them from the others. Letting go is the hardest part. Admittedly, it's hard; it takes a toll on your emotions. The days prior to adoption and the days following the adoption can be most difficult; some kittens are a lot harder than others to let go while others are a bit easier. The best part, however is when you know that your baby is doing well in his new home.❤❤❤ Personally, I NEED that closure otherwise I am restless without knowing how the baby is doing and if he is adjusting well to his environment. So my advice is this: Get in touch with the people that adopted these kittens. Find out how they're doing... ask for videos, not just pictures and keep in touch. It may seem like the pain will never go away but it will once you know your babies are OK- then you're OK. For lack of a better term to explain it, it's almost like a chapter complete with a happy ending.
unfortunately if I take to the shelter I won’t be able to follow progress. Unless they allow that. I will ask. Since I posted I may have another one in a home.
 
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