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Kitten Born With Backward Hind Legs

mint33

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Hi, I'll try to get a picture of Jessie in this thread in a moment, I apologize if I forget to by the end of this. Anyways I had recently gotten a kitten passed to me so I can take care of him. Since Jessie was born with backwards legs, the previous owners felt that the pound would put Jessie down so they gave him to me. He was the runt and is about 7 to 8 weeks old. He can manage to climb up couches and most furniture but can't really jump. He has no issues eating, pooping, peeing, drinking or sleeping. The only issue I have with Jessie is I have to constantly clean his butt after he poops, I think that may be something in his diet and I'll try to get maybe getting him to petsmart to get a trim back there to make it easier on me for when i need to clean him. I was wondering if anyone maybe knows what this is? I've done research and learned about contracted tendons but im not sure, im also concerned about any other conditions that follow this and how it could affect the health of my baby. If anyone really knows anything please tell me, I'd really appreciate it.
*they aren't good pictures but they are the best I could get of him.
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image0 (1).jpg
 

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Norachan

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I can't really tell from the picture, has the kitten been seen by a vet? Could it be Swimmer Syndrome? Without knowing exactly what his condition is it's impossible to say what might happen in the future. I suggest you get your vet to check him over, but if it is Swimmer Syndrome this can be remedied while he is still so young.


 

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Hi, I'll try to get a picture of Jessie in this thread in a moment, I apologize if I forget to by the end of this. Anyways I had recently gotten a kitten passed to me so I can take care of him. Since Jessie was born with backwards legs, the previous owners felt that the pound would put Jessie down so they gave him to me. He was the runt and is about 7 to 8 weeks old. He can manage to climb up couches and most furniture but can't really jump. He has no issues eating, pooping, peeing, drinking or sleeping. The only issue I have with Jessie is I have to constantly clean his butt after he poops, I think that may be something in his diet and I'll try to get maybe getting him to petsmart to get a trim back there to make it easier on me for when i need to clean him. I was wondering if anyone maybe knows what this is? I've done research and learned about contracted tendons but im not sure, im also concerned about any other conditions that follow this and how it could affect the health of my baby. If anyone really knows anything please tell me, I'd really appreciate it.
*they aren't good pictures but they are the best I could get of him.
View attachment 306912View attachment 306913
Hes a cutie...No matter how his little legs are..Thank u for taking him in..I would have taken him in also...Cause he's so precious...he special NOT different..Bless his little heart...Hope the VET can help the baby though as much as possible..:goodluck::welcomesign::hithere::redheartpump::petcat::bigeyes::purr::catlove::catrub::crossfingers:Welcome to the site :welcomesign: :purr::salam::heartshape::catman:
 
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He may have diarrhea because of all the stress in his life, with his deformity (which I'm sure he is completely unaware of) and being separated from his cat family. Once his stools firm up, I hope the problem resolves itself. He may be messing on himself because he can't squat properly, but once again, firmer stool would help. You could introduce 1 tsp. of pureed pure pumpkin into his food, not with any spices! This is a good fiber for cats. As long as he can get around, eat/drink and use teh litter box he shoudl be as happy as any other cat! I would sure research his condition and see if tehre is anything to be done while he is still young. check out The Cat Lady on teh internet, she has handled many special kittens. Bless you for helping this little angel, you are his angel here on earth.....
 

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Here is another link with information on braces for kittens with twisted legs.
It's difficult to see exactly what is going on with your kitten's legs in the picture you posted, but with most cases of twisted legs, if you start bracing the legs you have a chance of straightening them out. However it's important to start as soon as possible.
 

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What a beautiful kitty. I have no insight on this but I see some very knowledgeable and awesome people are here. Maybe, even more, will come along soon.

I wish you and kitty the best!

XOXO

I can't really tell from the picture, has the kitten been seen by a vet? Could it be Swimmer Syndrome? Without knowing exactly what his condition is it's impossible to say what might happen in the future. I suggest you get your vet to check him over, but if it is Swimmer Syndrome this can be remedied while he is still so young.


That.Video.Was.Awesome.

I was so excited that yup - I watched the update too! 👍
 

Mamanyt1953

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While I certainly can't diagnose his issue, he's at the perfect age to begin intervention! The first step is having a vet, preferably a feline specialist, take a look at him and determine exactly what caused this. Depending on what it is, there are several options, from braces and physical therapy to surgery to a little kitty wheelchair (and yes, those kittens live happy, active lives!).

It may be that the litter box issue is due to a spinal defect. In that case, get him trimmed and look into (if needed) kitty diapers for him. They are available.

He's a darling, and so lucky to have found you! I thrilled that you brought him here, to us! I really want to watch this little guy grow up, so keep us updated, even if it is just his day-to-day life!
 

lutece

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Although I completely agree that the kitten should be checked by a vet... just be aware that some vets are still not aware that twisted legs can be corrected, and may tell you that the kitten is deformed and will be crippled for life... even though most twisted legs respond well to therapeutic intervention, if started early in life.

I have had a vet suggest euthanasia for a newborn with twisted hind legs. I'm glad I didn't listen to that vet... by the time that kitten was weaned, his legs were totally normal and you would never know anything had been out of the ordinary when he was born.
 

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Thank you for helping him. I agree that a feline specialist or a major clinic known for treating various conditions, some obscure, is the way to go if you can get to one. This is not a condition with which I am familiar, but I have had two dogs who lost the use of their back legs and had carts and they adjusted completely. Animals view all of this different, and as was stated, this kitten does not know that anything is wrong, so he is hopeful and happy about his new life with you, or with some forever home.
 

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I'm surprised that no one suggested a fecal test for intestinal parasites, just to be on the safe side. This is something that should be done routinely with each round of kitten boosters, anyway, and then once yearly even if the kitty never goes outside. This is because it's remotely possible to track parasite eggs into your home on your shoes, etc., and with cats being such fastidious groomers, they could ingest these and pick up an infection. Unfortunately, I've seen it happen! So, it's just something to rule out as a cause for the messy bottom, and it can't hurt anything.
 
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mint33

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I'm surprised that no one suggested a fecal test for intestinal parasites, just to be on the safe side. This is something that should be done routinely with each round of kitten boosters, anyway, and then once yearly even if the kitty never goes outside. This is because it's remotely possible to track parasite eggs into your home on your shoes, etc., and with cats being such fastidious groomers, they could ingest these and pick up an infection. Unfortunately, I've seen it happen! So, it's just something to rule out as a cause for the messy bottom, and it can't hurt anything.
I'll make sure to get him checked, we are on a low budget, and are doing our best to help Jessie grow up happily and healthily. Do you know of anyways we can check for signs other than his poop?
 
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mint33

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Thank you for helping him. I agree that a feline specialist or a major clinic known for treating various conditions, some obscure, is the way to go if you can get to one. This is not a condition with which I am familiar, but I have had two dogs who lost the use of their back legs and had carts and they adjusted completely. Animals view all of this different, and as was stated, this kitten does not know that anything is wrong, so he is hopeful and happy about his new life with you, or with some forever home.
Jessie is very happy to have found a new mommy and a home yes! We're going to try to scrap up some funds to take him for a check up to a vet, as i stated in another comment my family has a low budget but we're doing the best we can.
 
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mint33

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Although I completely agree that the kitten should be checked by a vet... just be aware that some vets are still not aware that twisted legs can be corrected, and may tell you that the kitten is deformed and will be crippled for life... even though most twisted legs respond well to therapeutic intervention, if started early in life.

I have had a vet suggest euthanasia for a newborn with twisted hind legs. I'm glad I didn't listen to that vet... by the time that kitten was weaned, his legs were totally normal and you would never know anything had been out of the ordinary when he was born.
I'll try to get a more clear picture of jessie's legs but it may be in another post or an update. I think it may be to late for Jessie to have that therapy, his legs are under grown and crunched together most of the time. We think on of them may not have bones in it, but we're not to sure yet.
 
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mint33

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While I certainly can't diagnose his issue, he's at the perfect age to begin intervention! The first step is having a vet, preferably a feline specialist, take a look at him and determine exactly what caused this. Depending on what it is, there are several options, from braces and physical therapy to surgery to a little kitty wheelchair (and yes, those kittens live happy, active lives!).

It may be that the litter box issue is due to a spinal defect. In that case, get him trimmed and look into (if needed) kitty diapers for him. They are available.

He's a darling, and so lucky to have found you! I thrilled that you brought him here, to us! I really want to watch this little guy grow up, so keep us updated, even if it is just his day-to-day life!
Don't worry I'll be starting a blog about Jessie when I get the surprise and put it on youtube! I'll be sure to link it somewhere on here when it starts. We're currently trying to find a vet that knows what to do.
 
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mint33

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What a beautiful kitty. I have no insight on this but I see some very knowledgeable and awesome people are here. Maybe, even more, will come along soon.

I wish you and kitty the best!

XOXO



That.Video.Was.Awesome.

I was so excited that yup - I watched the update too! 👍
Thank you!
 
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mint33

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He may have diarrhea because of all the stress in his life, with his deformity (which I'm sure he is completely unaware of) and being separated from his cat family. Once his stools firm up, I hope the problem resolves itself. He may be messing on himself because he can't squat properly, but once again, firmer stool would help. You could introduce 1 tsp. of pureed pure pumpkin into his food, not with any spices! This is a good fiber for cats. As long as he can get around, eat/drink and use teh litter box he shoudl be as happy as any other cat! I would sure research his condition and see if tehre is anything to be done while he is still young. check out The Cat Lady on teh internet, she has handled many special kittens. Bless you for helping this little angel, you are his angel here on earth.....
Thank you for the advice, I'll look further into pumpkin seeds, do you have any other information on how the pumpkin seeds could be a con in anyway?
 
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mint33

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I can't really tell from the picture, has the kitten been seen by a vet? Could it be Swimmer Syndrome? Without knowing exactly what his condition is it's impossible to say what might happen in the future. I suggest you get your vet to check him over, but if it is Swimmer Syndrome this can be remedied while he is still so young.


Jessie has not been seen by a vet yet, we're currently trying to get him in.
 

mackiemac

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I'll make sure to get him checked, we are on a low budget, and are doing our best to help Jessie grow up happily and healthily. Do you know of anyways we can check for signs other than his poop?
A poop (fecal) test is the best way, because there are so many kinds of parasites. Some are worms, and others are single-celled organisms called protozoa, which can only be seen with a microscope. Different kinds of parasites need different kinds of medicines to treat them. So other than a fecal parasite test, there really isn't a way to know for sure whether your little one has parasites. Sorry.

However, for the basic kitten vaccines and tests, there are many low-cost clinics and agencies that may be able to help you with that. Regardless of the issue with his little legs, like any little one, vaccines and basic exam will help him to be healthy until you can work out the challenge with his legs. That's where a low cost clinic might be able to help, and they might even have some resources to help with his leg issue. Possibly a vet school might accept him as a teaching or continuing ed study case, and offer lowered-cost services in exchange for your allowing him to me a means to help teach other vets. You probably would not have to relinquish him... he would simply be a real case to help with teaching. I've heard of things like this when I was still an active tech.
 
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mint33

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A poop (fecal) test is the best way, because there are so many kinds of parasites. Some are worms, and others are single-celled organisms called protozoa, which can only be seen with a microscope. Different kinds of parasites need different kinds of medicines to treat them. So other than a fecal parasite test, there really isn't a way to know for sure whether your little one has parasites. Sorry.
Thats alright! I'll be sure to ask the vet about it when I take him in, thank you!
 

lutece

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I'll try to get a more clear picture of jessie's legs but it may be in another post or an update. I think it may be to late for Jessie to have that therapy, his legs are under grown and crunched together most of the time. We think on of them may not have bones in it, but we're not to sure yet.
An x-ray would give you more information about his leg bones if you can't tell from feeling his legs.
 
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