How much space for 2 kittens?

ZombieTiger

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Just out of curiosity, how big would my apartment have to be for 2 cats to live comfortably together? I currently have 1 extremely mellow and chill kitten, and the apartment is small enough for it to be OK with only 1 litter box. I might be able to fit 2 litter boxes, but 3 might be a problem and 4 just isn't an option. I'll have room for 2, maybe 3 large cat trees. Is my apartment too small?
 

susanm9006

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As long as you have space for two litter boxes and can clean them daily, and room for one cat tree, you should be fine. Kittens fortunately usually warm up to each other quickly but but you do need space or a plan to keep them separated during the introduction period.
 

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Horizontal space doesn't matter much to cats. They prefer vertical space so as long as you have a cat tree or a sturdy book case or even the top of the fridge, 2 cats will be fine even in a tiny studio, maybe even in those trendy micro apartments that are typically less than 400 square feet. 3 large cat trees is a bit much for a small apartment. One large one is plenty unless you plan to have no visitors and turn the apartment into one big cat play room :)

Two litter boxes are ideal but you can oftentimes get away with just one. I only have one litter box for 2 cats in 765 square feet and have never had an issue.
 

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I lived in a 900 sq foot apartment with two cats, one of which was a very active abyssinian. I had two litter boxes side by side in the bedroom, which was really the only spot with enough room. I didn't have any cat trees but they did like to sit up on the fireplace mantlepiece. It's helpful if you have safe spaces for both cats, even if they normally get along well together.
 

LTS3

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I lived in a 900 sq foot apartment with two cats, one of which was a very active abyssinian.

Good point. A super active, energetic breed like an Aby or Bengal wouldn't do well in a very small apartment. My Aby bounces off the walls :dizzy: He has less than 765 sq. ft most days because I don't allow the cats in the bedroom while I'm at work.

Z ZombieTiger roughly how big is your apartment? Two mellow cats would likely be fine. Do you have a second bedroom or something where you could put a new cat in for the first few days? The bathroom always works as long as you cat-proof it.
 

MonaLyssa33

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I lived in a 400 square foot studio with 2 cats. It worked pretty well. My dad built a little bridge for me so the cats could explore all of the kitchen cabinets and it gave them extra space to look down on me. I had two litter boxes and one cat tree too.
 
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ZombieTiger

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Z ZombieTiger roughly how big is your apartment? Two mellow cats would likely be fine. Do you have a second bedroom or something where you could put a new cat in for the first few days? The bathroom always works as long as you cat-proof it.
I'm not sure about the conversion, but roughly 500 sq ft maybe? The layout is somewhat odd though, it's a loft apartment with 2 living rooms and no real bedroom, but they share a door I can close or put a gate in and they also have their separate entrances, one to the hallway and the other one to the kitchen, where the kitchen is more or less same as the hallway but with plumbing.

The room I use as a bedroom is where kitten has most of his toys, food station and litterbox. We use both rooms, but he seems to like the "bedroom" one best, it's also the only room with a window apart from the kitchen.

I could keep a new kitten in the other living room during introduction and also alternate who gets to spend time in the kitchen and hallway until they're familiar I suppose. Worst case scenario, I could close off so that they couldn't see or fight each other, but they would definitely know that someone else was there.
 

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my 5 cats have a large sized cat room, bedroom, master bath and closet they primarily stay in ... with a lot of vertical space ... cat trees ( we have 5 ), cat shelving , hiding spots. tunnels , cubbies ... they have the option to explore the rest of the house but prefer to stay upstairs because of our dogs ... I think more important than the overall space is ... how well the cats get along ... and how interesting their environment is ... windows, cat shelving, cat trees and options to get out of each other's sight ( we have a cat tree in the bathroom that is very popular for naps). Two cats need a minimum of two litter boxes ... and two feeding and water spots ...better three ... I personally think that two kittens is always better than one ... they enrich each other, play for hours and are more active and even later in. life ... having a cat room mate makes their life more interesting ... My cats all have " active hour" before bedtime and in the morning and gallop around - chasing each other up and down the trees and clearly enjoy company ... I never have to worry about going on vacation ( besides finding a petsitter who is willing to put up with our zoo ... ) - I know my cats are not lonely or depressed when I am not here ...
 

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Lofts can be hard for cat introductions :ohwell: A full two level loft with stairs would be somewhat easier than a one level. You can always keep a new cat in the bathroom until slow introductions are made. Or put up baby gates or something like this to keep the cats separate but still allow them to see and smell each other.
 
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ZombieTiger

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Lofts can be hard for cat introductions :ohwell: A full two level loft with stairs would be somewhat easier than a one level. You can always keep a new cat in the bathroom until slow introductions are made. Or put up baby gates or something like this to keep the cats separate but still allow them to see and smell each other.
I don't know. I forgot to mention that most of the walls are full walls, I can have normal sized bookcases and wardrobes (?). What really bothers me is the lack of windows/daylight, like I said, only the kitchen and the "bedroom" has them.

The bathroom isn't an option in my opinion, it's very small, no air apart from a small fan (?), no daylight and quite noisy. No place for a kitten to live. The second living room would be a lot better.

(I've been looking for another apartment, but I'm extremely picky, believe it or not.)

Anyway, just thinking out loud here. I appreciate the input.
 
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ZombieTiger

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I personally think that two kittens is always better than one ... they enrich each other, play for hours and are more active and even later in. life ... having a cat room mate makes their life more interesting ... My cats all have " active hour" before bedtime and in the morning and gallop around - chasing each other up and down the trees and clearly enjoy company ... I never have to worry about going on vacation ( besides finding a petsitter who is willing to put up with our zoo ... ) - I know my cats are not lonely or depressed when I am not here ...
Agreed. Maybe? I don't know me, I'm pretty new to everything cat.

Initially I only wanted one cat because I thought they were all solitary, but I've learned enough since to know that some of them need company.

When I found the one I have now, I asked about having one of his siblings as well, but they were all taken. I'm starting to regret not insisting, because there's always a thought in the back of my head that my Favourite Kitten will always be bored, no matter what I do to entertain him.
 
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ZombieTiger

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The more I think about it, making more vertical space is doable. I can stay as long as I want in the apartment I have now if I can't find anything better and I'm definitely more attentive to my (indoor) pets than an average people. Also, I think my Roscoff would do well with a friend. We're also leash/harness training so that he can spend time outside under supervision, and if I get another kitten I plan to do that with him/her as well.

I'm thinking that I should ask around at the shelters around here for a kitten, the people know more about cats than I do and if I can have a kitten and things doesn't work, they will hopefully be able to help me rehome the new one. Anyone have any thoughts about that?
 
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ZombieTiger

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Blah, I keep going back and forth as to wether I should get Roscoff a friend or not.

On one hand I really enjoy having only one cat, but on the other hand I feel guilty when he has to be alone or I'm busy or not in the mood to entertain him, despite him probably already getting more cuddles and attention than the average cat.

It's also a lot easier to bring one cat places than two. And what if he actually likes being a single kitten, and bringing in another one ruins our closeness? The other kitten will need attention too.

On the other hand again, I also want a dog or two in a couple of years (after I've found a suitable apartment /house) and Roscoff will have to spend some more time alone then, although probably not more than 3 or 5 hours a day. IF I really end up getting a dog. Which I might not after all.

Grrrrr, I hate thinking. 🙄
 

neely

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It sounds like you have a lot of thinking to do. 😉 Since you have a cat now you know what the responsibilities are but getting a dog is an entirely different commitment. I've had both cats and dogs, some were not thrilled but coexisted and some were great pals. You may want to consider fostering another kitten before permanently adopting one. As for being lonely Roscoff probably sleeps when you are gone so try not to feel too guilty. Take your time before making a decision and please feel free to ask anymore questions.

ETA: I don't know if you have had dogs in the past but they require both physical and mental exercise, e.g. a walk around the block is not enough exercise for most dogs. Cats can go in a litter box indoors but dogs have to be taken out to potty. Also dogs cannot be left alone for more than approx. 5 - 6 hours. I don't want to deter you in any way just point out the differences between an additional kitten and a dog. 🐱 🐶
 
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ZombieTiger

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It sounds like you have a lot of thinking to do. 😉
At least I'm not in too much of a hurry. And no worries, I've had dogs before, so I'm not worried about a potential one that may move in a couple of years from now. It's just cats that are new to me. Dogs are a lot easier! 😄
 
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