How do you introduce a new kitten to a cat in my circumstances?

Renne

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The cat is 1.4 y.o., the potential kitten is going to be 3 to 4 months. I have no lockable rooms in the house, so I cannot really make them stay apart for days until they meet.

My goal for them is to play with each other. My cat is craaaazy active and playful, but she cannot entertain herself, so it falls down to me. You can't imagine my life, it's almost impossible to do anything on my own in peace, including important activities like work from home. So my goal is to make my cat friendly enough with the new kitten that they can entertain each other.

Feel free to point me to credible articles or even books about it, I'm ready to study the matter in-depth. I'm sure this has been discussed to death here, sorry. But I'll appreciate your own advise very much, as I know nothing about it.

P.S. Some random things I've wondering about, too: I've heard somewhere that you should take a towel and rub it upon both cats before they meet, so that they have their own smells on each other. I've also heard that you should adopt a male kitten if you have a female cat, as females compete with each other?
 

Mamanyt1953

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The good thing is that your kitten will almost certainly be young enough that your older cat won't be picking up on hormones, which is the big problem in introducing two females. If you can get them bonded before the young one reaches sexual maturity, then spay her PROMPTLY at six months, a lot of this won't be the issue it might otherwise be.

Most of the time, an older cat will adjust to a kitten fairly quickly. This article is full of good stuff on how to smooth that path:

 

rubysmama

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Adult cats generally accept kittens quicker than older cats, but it's not a sure thing. In fact, some adult cats can actually be scared of the kitten. So if possible, somehow separating them at first, would be preferential.

Is your home like a studio apartment, with just the bathroom having a door? If so, maybe try keeping the kitten in there for a day or so.

About whether to adopt a male or female kitten, maybe this TCS article will be helpful:
Your Second Cat: How To Choose The Best Friend For Kitty – TheCatSite Articles
 
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Renne

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Thank you for advise and links!

Today I went to see our potential kitten. She is a lively Bengal, 3.5 months at the moment and will be spayed in a few days. She seems very inquisitive, somewhat bossy and totally unafraid of strangers. She just keeps running and running around. It's a big contrast. Our cat is playful but also very timid, gentle, and 'lady-like'. The kitten is a 'tomboy' and will definitely be the boss.

Is your home like a studio apartment, with just the bathroom having a door? If so, maybe try keeping the kitten in there for a day or so.
I think both of them will have an easy time opening the door. It isn't lockable, and our cat knows how to open regular doors, even tightly closed, from both sides. The kitten is also very smart. The best I can do is place her there and hope that they both of them feel stressed enough not to intrude upon each other. But the kitten is crazy playful, like a ball of energy, and I have no doubts that once the initial scare of a new home wears off she'll want to escape the contained space.
 

rubysmama

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Mamanyt1953

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Have you had a Bengal before? They are a law unto themselves! Wonderful cats, but definitely a law unto themselves. We do have several members with a LOT of Bengal experience, so you'll have a ready-made support group while you adjust, should it be needed.
 
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Renne

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Who are those members? ;) I sorely need their help trying to decide if I can actually afford keeping a Bengal:
 

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Who are those members? ;) I sorely need their help trying to decide if I can actually afford keeping a Bengal:
Oops..sorry Renne Renne I totally missed getting to your post. (sorry Bek too)
Quick simple answers.
Bengals will eat more than your average cat..they are high activity all the time and burn up a lot of nervous and physical energy and build a lot of muscle as they grow.As they get older and the activity level drops they will have more of a normal appetite.
As a kitten it will be an eating machine as it grows
They will do better on raw or good quality canned food with no vegetable or organic fillers..they do poorly on kibble so your food expenses will be higher..
Also your pet insurance will be higher as when they are younger they seem to have a death wish and getting hurt is not unusual.
.
Most Bengals love other animals and if your other cat accepts the kitten they will be playing and cuddling within a couple of days.
The Bengal will dominate your other cat and start playing a bit rough when she gets older..you will have to be in control of this.
Also I hope you have done your homework and not buying this cat just on looks alone. They will climb to the highest points in your house, they do not go around things, they go through so anything fragile or breakable you have on shelves or anything of high value you will have to put away for at least 3 years until they get over there teenage years, nothing is safe.
They are very demanding and will take up a lot of your time but having a playmate it should make things a lot easier.
Look at the complete package you are buying, lots of you tube videos about preparing to buy a Bengal.
Other wise they are a hell of a lot of fun and have you laughing your head off a lot but be prepared for an adventure ride as the cat grows.
Forgot to add..They are highly intelligent and will watch how you open doors, windows and cupboards and will get into everything...kiddy locks on doors and cupboards are a must.
 
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Renne

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Oops..sorry Renne Renne I totally missed getting to your post. (sorry Bek too)
No worries, I got to your post late, as well. Mostly because I didn't know if I'd be adopting that kitten, but now I know I will be, in about a few days, we've agreed on everything with the owner. Just now, in fact, on the phone.

But could you please clarify this:
The Bengal will dominate your other cat and start playing a bit rough when she gets older..you will have to be in control of this.
What did you mean by playing rough? I don't like how that sounds for my cat, she is so timid. My primary reason for choosing this kitten was having a playmate for my own cat, and if she's going to hurt her when she grows older, then my wish to adopt her suddenly sounds like a bad idea. I'm starting to have second thoughts. :(
 

Silver Crazy

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What did you mean by playing rough? I don't like how that sounds for my cat, she is so timid. My primary reason for choosing this kitten was having a playmate for my own cat, and if she's going to hurt her when she grows older, then my wish to adopt her suddenly sounds like a bad idea. I'm starting to have second thoughts.
Just imagine an over excited dog with a toddler, not fighting and biting or clawing, just dont know their own strength, you will have to step in and distract or intervene if gets to rough, its only play and nothing viscous but your other cat being older will probably lose a lot of her timidity with such a rowdy playmate and will discipline the kitten fairy quick. Then again the Bengal could be a laid back cat and given a lot of play and attention from you wont pester the other cat.
But most likely the Bengal will bond to your other cat and love her to death if your other cat allows it.
Its good you are thinking about this, a lot of people buy Bengals for their looks alone and the cats end up being abondoned or in shelters because they cant handle having such hyperactive cats when they are young..they calm down a lot as they mature but mine is 5 years old and still thinks he is a kitten sometimes.
 
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Mamanyt1953

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To be absolutely fair, Silver Crazy Silver Crazy 's cat came to him from a very rough background, and may well be just now getting to be a kitten! So keep that in mind, as well! Bengals are very active, but if you expect that, and respect that, and take the other advice onboard, you should be fine!
 
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Renne

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For now I decided not to adopt that kitten, after all, and I already told the owner. Having doubts is not a good sign when adopting a kitten. But we're keeping in touch with the owner, maybe later when she has new kittens I'll change my mind. I'm going to read a book I've found on how to make cats live together so that I don't feel so overwhelmed and uninformed about the topic when I make such an important decision.

EDIT: That said, are there good sites dedicated to Bengals or books specifically on Bengal cats? I'd love to learn as much as I can about the breed from credible sources.
 
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