How do people have tons of cats that’s get along in one home?

clary7

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Every once in a while I’ll see a post on social media of a person that owns 20+ cats or a sanctuary home with 100+ cats. Just now I watched this video of a lady that has 1,000+ cats (she rescues and rehomes)


Every time I see one of these posts or videos though I always wonder how it’s possible to have so many cats in one place and have them all get along, or at least not fight each other. I have only 5 cats and even with so few they have their issues with each other. So I don’t understand how it’s possible for some people to have 10 or even 100 cats and have them all get along without some of them fighting. I would absolutely love to have 10 or more cats, and if I ever have enough money I would absolutely make a cat sanctuary (as I plan to buy lots of land in a few years so I can definitely make it happen) and rescue at least 50 cats if I could. But I just don’t understand how this can be possible from a behavioral standpoint. Can someone help me understand? Because I am starting to think that in the future I shouldn’t have more than 3 cats at once because of how they develop issues with each other over time, but I love cats and would much rather rescue as many as I could afford. I just don’t get how it’s possible to have tons and tons of cats in one place without some fighting going on or some cats being scared and anxious of all the other cats.
 

ArtNJ

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I've noticed this too. Not this extreme, but with the posters here that have 7 or so. And also with the shelter. You hear all the time "I dont understand why he is being like this, the shelter said he is fine with other cats!" And for me, and many many others that post here, if you add a new cat, and the residents aren't young, its huge problems. I've wondered if there is a social/biological effect that makes colonies possible -- i.e., you get enough cats together, and there is a natural biological force that counters the tendency of new cats to cause trouble. I mean, we know there is a natural biological force that prevents adults from attacking kittens with intent to injure, so its not totaly crazy to hypothesize a restraining force in different circumstances. Whereas you introduce a new cat without that colony effect, and its more like an interloper wandering into the resident's territory.
 

Mamanyt1953

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I think that A ArtNJ is onto something here. Added, to that, one cat entering the territory of a clowder would, I'd think, be very cautious and on its best behavior, since, "Hey, all these guys are friends..."
 

Kat0121

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I think that A ArtNJ is onto something here. Added, to that, one cat entering the territory of a clowder would, I'd think, be very cautious and on its best behavior, since, "Hey, all these guys are friends..."
I think it depends a lot on how the clowder operates. Norachan Norachan has a large clowder and they seem to operate like a well oiled machine. They come from many different backgrounds yet they seem to really get along. I think if one of the cats accepts the newbie the others will be more likely to do so as well. They will watch and see how it goes and then decide for themselves. Little Boy (my kitty crush) seems to be the cat in her clowder who welcomes newcomers into the family. I think that he's earned respect from the rest of the clowder and if the newbie is accepted by him then he/she must be ok.
 

Norachan

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I currently have 19, the most I ever had in this house was 27 but that was because I had a litter of foster kittens waiting to go to new homes as well as my resident cats.

I have a huge enclosure. I don't think I'd be able to cope if my cats were indoor only. I've also catified the house as much as possible, so the cats have plenty of vertical space. And as Kat0121 Kat0121 said, I have my secret weapon Little Boy. He's not to keen on new adult males, but female cats are always welcome and he adores kittens.

You need to make sure everyone is spayed and neutered. You need to do the introductions slowly. You need to buy industrial amounts of enzyme cleaner and pee pads, because introducing new cats usually means the resident boys have to spray the door of the room the newbies are in.

But if you don't mind all the extra cleaning and have the space and funds to do it large groups of cats can be lots of fun.

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clary7

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Okay I see, this makes sense. How many cats minimum should there be though to get this effect?
 

BoaztheAdventureCat

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I'm not sure how this is possible either. The animal rescue that I'm a volunteer for has had to battle with the local cat hoarder who's been causing trouble for my whole neighborhood for years, so we kind of get a bad taste in our mouths whenever we hear of people owning an enormous group of cats.
 

Kat0121

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I'm not sure how this is possible either. The animal rescue that I'm a volunteer for has had to battle with the local cat hoarder who's been causing trouble for my whole neighborhood for years, so we kind of get a bad taste in our mouths whenever we hear of people owning an enormous group of cats.
There's a huge difference between people who just collect animals and let them cause havoc by not taking proper care of them and those who take the responsibility seriously.. Look at all of the shelters out there who don't cage their cats and have them free in the same area. It's done all the time. Some cats will fit in with the group like they have always been there and some won't.
 

Norachan

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The animal rescue that I'm a volunteer for has had to battle with the local cat hoarder who's been causing trouble for my whole neighborhood for years, so we kind of get a bad taste in our mouths whenever we hear of people owning an enormous group of cats.
You can't let one bad hoarder colour your impression of everyone else who cares for multiple cats.
:)
There's a huge difference between people who just collect animals and let them cause havoc by not taking proper care of them and those who take the responsibility seriously
:yeah:
You have to know your limits. I know that 20 is about the most I can afford to care for properly and about the maximum number of cats that can live comfortably in the house and enclosure that I have.

I would have loved to have kept all the foster kittens I cared for, but I knew that cute, healthy, socialized kittens would be very easy to rehome. There's always going to be another cat that isn't suitable for rehoming due to disease or behaviour problems. I keep the one who are too feral to handle or who have FIV or something like that.

And everyone is spayed, neutered, vaccinated, given a proper diet and vet attention whenever necessary. They don't roam around or cause any problems for my neighbours.
 

Meowmee

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Every once in a while I’ll see a post on social media of a person that owns 20+ cats or a sanctuary home with 100+ cats. Just now I watched this video of a lady that has 1,000+ cats (she rescues and rehomes)


Every time I see one of these posts or videos though I always wonder how it’s possible to have so many cats in one place and have them all get along, or at least not fight each other. I have only 5 cats and even with so few they have their issues with each other. So I don’t understand how it’s possible for some people to have 10 or even 100 cats and have them all get along without some of them fighting. I would absolutely love to have 10 or more cats, and if I ever have enough money I would absolutely make a cat sanctuary (as I plan to buy lots of land in a few years so I can definitely make it happen) and rescue at least 50 cats if I could. But I just don’t understand how this can be possible from a behavioral standpoint. Can someone help me understand? Because I am starting to think that in the future I shouldn’t have more than 3 cats at once because of how they develop issues with each other over time, but I love cats and would much rather rescue as many as I could afford. I just don’t get how it’s possible to have tons and tons of cats in one place without some fighting going on or some cats being scared and anxious of all the other cats.
I am not sure really. It all depends on the cats, and the person. Her cats go outside too, so that probably helps a lot. That many cats would drive me crazy as much as I love them. 😹😹

We have five now and it’s a lot of work. I am hoping eventually to find a home for my lastest two who came inside but they are not touchable and have fiv. it is not easy with an older cat to find a new home.

When I took Merlin in, he had bitten me, he was fiv/ felv negative, but in he end no one would help me, so a cat who bit you is the hardest to find a home for. I trained him not to bite though and he is the biggest love bug. My family didn't want him at the time but then changed their minds.

They new guys are sweet boys, and love each other. I have cared for them for 8-9 years outside. I hope they will evolve, and become less scared of people. So far the cats all get along ok, but the new guys are still in a large bedroom by themselves mostly. They are not treat motivated at all, I tried all of that with them.

Someone who ran a shelter I volunteered for had maybe 15-20 cats and 2-4 dogs at a time in her small home, and others in a heated building in cages during quarantine. They would then go to fosters or to stores for adoption. I don’t know how she did it, but she loved all her fur babies. None of the cats went outside either!
 

CaseysMom

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Do you think there's a certain age "past" where it becomes harder to introduce a new cat? Just wondering, because Tiny is approaching a year old, and I wonder if I'm missing the window to "easily" get her a sibling. Honestly though, I mostly lean toward having an only cat. She seems very happy. :blush:
 

jaxtabby

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Only have three boys in my house and that is a house full for me They all get along and play with an occasion out of control moment but quickly make up and all sleep together at time. I can’t imagine having 20+ cats in my house as these as all I can care for now.
 
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