Holding bad leg up

tiggerwillow

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The vet has said that leg will always be weaker than her other legs, she's going into the vet again on the 28th

She's able to put weight on it but she's holding that leg up more than she used to, only for a few seconds at a time

her weak/bad leg is her back right leg, she had a major injury in it back in 2020 and had to have the leg pinned back together

pins are still firmly in place, she just tires really fast in that leg lately

just wondering how I can help her with it at this point

she only holds it up for a matter of seconds when she's stood still - like when she's chewing on some grasses

she can't push very well with it any more cause someone is remote controlling it and keeps messing with it
 

FeebysOwner

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If the pins are in place, does that mean she went through at least some x-rays? Did the vet mention anything about some arthritis setting in? Adequan or Solensia are both geared toward pain related to arthritis, the former one also has a joint supplement in it.

Have you consulted with a vet that specializes in orthopedics to see if they have any suggestions for treatments that might help?
 

neely

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I also wondered about the possibility of arthritis perhaps due to scar tissue after her major injury. Could she take something like Gabapentin for pain or discomfort?
 
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tiggerwillow

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She has injections once a month to help with arthritis she was on metacam then gabapention (spelling) but metacam caused her to vomit and diarrhea, the gabapention (idk spelling) she refused to take at all, she would pretend to have it then spit it out in the litter tray and bury it
 
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tiggerwillow

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The injection thing is solensia (I think that's the right spelling)

I suck
 

neely

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When you see the vet on the 28th you may want to ask about the possibility of her problem being neurological. Good luck and please keep us posted after the vet appointment. :crossfingers:
 
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tiggerwillow

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When you see the vet on the 28th you may want to ask about the possibility of her problem being neurological. Good luck and please keep us posted after the vet appointment. :crossfingers:
Her leg only got like this after the injury in 2020 so idk
 

FeebysOwner

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Some cats are getting both Solensia and Adequan, so another consideration. As far as the injury, there could be nerve damage which is along the lines of a neurological issue. Something else you can talk to the vet about.
 
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tiggerwillow

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Some cats are getting both Solensia and Adequan, so another consideration. As far as the injury, there could be nerve damage which is along the lines of a neurological issue. Something else you can talk to the vet about.
thanks feeby

vet had put her on a couple of medications before the injection but she came off them for different reasons

the metacam cause first there was a concern about her kidneys, then she started having diareah and vomitting

then the tablets she kept spitting them out into the litter tray and burying them - so naturally when they've been covered in cat litter i couldn't reuse them

the injection is helping, i think her holding her leg up is more a case of it tires so fast cause she wants to jump places then her leg gives way
 

FeebysOwner

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I am guessing the leg is weaker rather than getting tired easier. Maybe that is what you mean. I wonder about some physical therapy if you don't believe there is nerve damage?
 
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tiggerwillow

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I am guessing the leg is weaker rather than getting tired easier. Maybe that is what you mean. I wonder about some physical therapy if you don't believe there is nerve damage?
there probably is nerve damage tbh, the vet said a couple of years ago she will always have problems with the leg, since that injury

poor baby :heartshape:
 
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tiggerwillow

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Tigger update, so I not being a spams and starting a new thread: vet has seen her, a quick in and out cause they had a emergency so one vet was doing the non emergency stuff, every other vet was helping with the emergency

Vet has said that her leg will get weaker and weaker as she ages, she has put the weight back on that she lost, vet thinks her body is telling her she needs more food, they gave her the normal injection she gets but haven't done anything more this time, they be monitoring her every month for now cause they don't think she currently needs anything doing other than the injection

I'm worrying over if her leg gets so bad she can't use it at all, well it will eventually get that bad but hopefully not for a long time

Vet said cause she's struggling to keep weight on (age related) to give her food when she asks cause it'll stop her weight from dropping like it did, she put that weight back cause I been feeding her more than usual

Willow will stop eating when she's had enough, she self regulates, so my idea is when I'm working leave food down as soon as I leave for work, see how it goes
 

FeebysOwner

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I still think looking into physical therapy is a good idea. I'd like to hear from a specialist that Willow's leg is only going to get worse and that therapy, which has many forms, would not help. I don't think that is what you would hear.

As drastic as it may sound, perhaps amputation is an option. Cats adapt very well, and that would certainly prevent Willow's leg from being able to decline further. Of course, age and general health is a consideration, as well as looking at therapy options that would obviously be much less drastic.
 

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There are rear end harnesses which make it easier to help a pet with a back leg problem. Dogs usually take to these quite well, although I am not sure about cats. This is an example but I am not suggesting that you need to buy this kind. It might even be possible to make one yourself if you think it would help.
Cats
 
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tiggerwillow

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Question: if the worst happens and the vet decides to take her leg off, is Tigger likely to cope with the anasthectic? (spelling)

She's 12

I know with Willow (8/9 years old) if Willow was the one to need anasthectic, the vets would be very caucious (spelling) cause Willow has a known heart murmur (mild, but the vets have said previously they would have to be very careful giving her anasthectic)

To our knowledge, Tigger doesn't have anything wrong with her heart, her bad leg is her disability, poor baby
 
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tiggerwillow

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reason for asking this is cause Mum said today that Tigger's a old cat now when we was discussing worst case scenarios and said she might not cope with anasthectics
 

FeebysOwner

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Question: if the worst happens and the vet decides to take her leg off, is Tigger likely to cope with the anasthectic? (spelling) She's 12 I know with Willow (8/9 years old) if Willow was the one to need anasthectic, the vets would be very caucious (spelling) cause Willow has a known heart murmur (mild, but the vets have said previously they would have to be very careful giving her anasthectic) To our knowledge, Tigger doesn't have anything wrong with her heart, her bad leg is her disability, poor baby
Most vets would do a full work up on Tigger which, at her age, should include an EKG and/or ECG - that would tell them the condition her heart is in and if there would be any special precautions to take. There are also some anethesia products that are more conducive for older cats.

Although considered a senior, 12 is really not that old, especially if Tigger's health is good otherwise. Maybe I am biased, but I am taking care of a 19+ yo, so 12 looks pretty good to me!
 
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