Having a Dilemma on Neutering

solomonar

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No matter what you decide on neutering or on finding him a home, vaccination is a must. As soon as possible.
That is because first thing is to keep him healthy.

So the priority list, in my humble opinion:
1) vaccination (no matter what else you decide to do)
2) find him a home (that is no matter what you do, you cant remove cars from the street and anyway it is the best solution)
3) make sure he has sufficient food and water (that is because of both his personal wellbeing and to avoid fight with other cats)
4) for you to decide about neutering (if 2 does not work in due time)
 
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Willowy

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Hmm, I would have guessed the vets would have vaccinated him when he had the pillow foot surgery. Anyway, yes, if it wasn't done before he should be vaccinated now. That really doesn't have anything to do with neutering, except for the risk of being at the vet's office while unvaccinated, but he's already done that.
 

niki-nicole

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That is the problem with only kind-of taking care of a feral colony. Feeding is the easy part. To fully take care of them, they should all be getting regular vaccines and checkups by trapping them and spaying/neutering to keep the population down.

Failure to do this will result in an ever-increasing population, more fights and injuries, more diseases passing through causing worse issues (especially eyes and lungs), and even deadly diseases like FPV. A tiny little kitten we took in had FPV and we had to put him to sleep when he could no longer function. I held him as he was given the shot to end his life. It was heartbreaking. This is why I'm so passionate about spaying and neutering. Kittens are so vulnerable and can have miserable lives with eye infections, covered in lice and fleas at just a few days old, and not enough food. Or older cats with arthritis and other infirmities causing them to starve to death.

Cats are not native animals. Humans are responsible for them whether they are in our houses or our neighborhoods.

If you can't do this, try to get a TNR organization to help.
 

niki-nicole

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Sorry I'm coming off strong. I come from a line of cat ladies. My grandparents took care of a feral colony because people figured out they could dump their cats their. They were constantly trying to vaccinate, spay/neuter, and treat all the different illnesses.

But I am happy you are helping with what you can. Every little bit helps.
 
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