Hair serum transferred to cats coat

Sweetpea.

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Hello
Can I please get some advice. I never usually use add on products in my hair. I have just moved to a new city and having trouble with the water ..long story short I used a hair serum one night and immediately washed it out the next morning due to the greasiness. This was over a week ago. I must have transferred from my hands to my cats coat because their they are grease balls. I’ve just replaced their brushes as I thought we were past everything but noticed todaytheir new ones are greasy and they still feel pretty greasy. I’m guess I’m transferring it back and forth with the brush? Idk, it as caviar hair serum. Any suggestions on how I can get rid of this mess minus a bath. As soon as I pet them I feel like I need to use sanitizer then wash to keep the grease from spreading. Would blotting papers help?
 

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Hi, blotting paper maybe, aren't there dry shampoos for pets that might work?
 
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Sweetpea.

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Thank you I will try the wipes. I actually bought that brand of shampoo several years ago from PetSmart before I realized baths were not going to happen!! On the dry shampoo.. I know when I used to use it it made my hair feel more dirty like it needed to be washed. A couple of years ago one of the cats was having really bad dandruff and I tried BurtsBees for her. I only did one brush thru her and to me it’s seems like it made her more greasy. My cats shed ALOT and sometimes I’ll pet them with damp hands to pull off hair. So I think wipes would be a good thin. I’ll also check their bedding for washing. Thank you all!
 
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Sweetpea.

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I was actually just reading the reviews on those wipes and they mentioned allow which I just googled and it says is toxic to cats
 

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Aloe is generally considered to be toxic to cats (dogs and horses, too) only if they eat it.

As to how toxic aloe is, that depends on the size/age of the cat and how much they eat. One or two licks might only make them sick enough to throw up or get diarrhea. If they eat more, the symptoms will be worse. It's hard to say exactly how much it would take to make a cat sick enough to go to the hospital because there are too many factors.

For pet wipes with aloe, I don't think there is a lot of risk because a cat generally won't eat them. I can't imagine why a cat would think they are good to eat but you never know.

I just wouldn't buy pet wipes with aloe in them. Chances of your cat getting sick from them is most important but, also, aloe doesn't really bring anything to the table. Aloe Vera gel can be soothing and makes your skin feel nice but it doesn't do much else. It doesn't have very many healing properties that can't be had from some other products. It probably isn't worth the premium price you pay for products made with aloe. Besides, aloe is meant to soothe skin. Cats are covered in fur. What good would it do if the stuff doesn't get on the cat's skin where it's "supposed" to go?

I wouldn't recommend products with aloe in them just on the grounds that they are based on little more than "empty marketing."
(Products that are designed to appeal to consumers' emotions and sense of consumerism rather than ones that have any real scientific merit or tangible value.)

If you like aloe because it's nice for your skin, go ahead and buy some but don't have any illusions that it has any magical properties. It doesn't. It's just "plant goop..." Plant goop that can make your cats sick if they eat it.

BTW: What hair serum did you use? What brand? Do you care to tell?
If we know what it is, maybe, we can look up the ingredients list. That way we can try to figure out a way to remove it from places where it's not wanted.

Off the top of my head, I'd say that "Dawn" dish detergent is my first guess. If you don't like that idea, my second suggestion is Dr. Bronner's castile soap. Both of them are good at removing oil and grease. They might make your cats' skin and fur a bit dry for a short time but it should go back to normal fairly quickly.

Mix some up in a bowl of warm water until it's nice and sudsy. Dip a washcloth in the soap solution and wipe down the cats. Follow with a cloth dipped in plain, warm water.

Washable bedding and upholstery can probably just be cleaned in the washing machine with your regular laundry detergent.

Surface washable items that can't go in the wash such as pillows, draperies and furniture can probably be cleaned with a wet cloth, the same as you do for the cats, themselves.
 
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Sweetpea.

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Aloe is generally considered to be toxic to cats (dogs and horses, too) only if they eat it.

As to how toxic aloe is, that depends on the size/age of the cat and how much they eat. One or two licks might only make them sick enough to throw up or get diarrhea. If they eat more, the symptoms will be worse. It's hard to say exactly how much it would take to make a cat sick enough to go to the hospital because there are too many factors.

For pet wipes with aloe, I don't think there is a lot of risk because a cat generally won't eat them. I can't imagine why a cat would think they are good to eat but you never know.

I just wouldn't buy pet wipes with aloe in them. Chances of your cat getting sick from them is most important but, also, aloe doesn't really bring anything to the table. Aloe Vera gel can be soothing and makes your skin feel nice but it doesn't do much else. It doesn't have very many healing properties that can't be had from some other products. It probably isn't worth the premium price you pay for products made with aloe. Besides, aloe is meant to soothe skin. Cats are covered in fur. What good would it do if the stuff doesn't get on the cat's skin where it's "supposed" to go?

I wouldn't recommend products with aloe in them just on the grounds that they are based on little more than "empty marketing."
(Products that are designed to appeal to consumers' emotions and sense of consumerism rather than ones that have any real scientific merit or tangible value.)

If you like aloe because it's nice for your skin, go ahead and buy some but don't have any illusions that it has any magical properties. It doesn't. It's just "plant goop..." Plant goop that can make your cats sick if they eat it.

BTW: What hair serum did you use? What brand? Do you care to tell?
If we know what it is, maybe, we can look up the ingredients list. That way we can try to figure out a way to remove it from places where it's not wanted.

Off the top of my head, I'd say that "Dawn" dish detergent is my first guess. If you don't like that idea, my second suggestion is Dr. Bronner's castile soap. Both of them are good at removing oil and grease. They might make your cats' skin and fur a bit dry for a short time but it should go back to normal fairly quickly.

Mix some up in a bowl of warm water until it's nice and sudsy. Dip a washcloth in the soap solution and wipe down the cats. Follow with a cloth dipped in plain, warm water.

Washable bedding and upholstery can probably just be cleaned in the washing machine with your regular laundry detergent.

Surface washable items that can't go in the wash such as pillows, draperies and furniture can probably be cleaned with a wet cloth, the same as you do for the cats, themselves.
Thank you for that info. The product was alterna caviar bond serum. I do have some baby wipes they are called water wipes. Any other suggestions on wipes? Getting these cats into a bath, I don’t think that will happen.
 
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Sweetpea.

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Gosh I have been looking thru ingredients and they are stacked!! I had left over water wipes as my late pup had horrible skin issues and I would sometimes use these. They are 99.9 water .01 grapefruit extract. I have just read grapefruit is extremely toxic and can be absorbed into skin. Glad I didn’t use them yet. How do all these pet wipes sell so well with so much in them that is bad sheesh. On a side note, Can someone please help me with how to directly reply in a message, is there a shortcut? On one of my last threads I had to write my post in notepad and copy paste into the website because when I try to copy paste a user name straight into the post this is what happens : @ Furballsmom Furballsmom
 
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Sweetpea.

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Okay well never mind on the shortcut for the username I guess. On my very first reply to a post it made some kind of <bold username > type wording instead of the names and would not post correctly…
 

Caspers Human

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How do all these pet wipes sell so well with so much in them that is bad sheesh.
Empty marketing: Putting pretty pictures on packages to catch the consumer's eye, coupled with flashy, "weasel words" to confuse and deceive people into buying a product when it doesn't have any real merit. It's all in the advertising!

People need to learn to be more critical when looking at new products. Read the BACK of the package before you buy. Learn to recognize BS when you see it and call it out when you can.

I took a look at the ingredients list of that hair product you didn't like. It was made up, mostly, of oils and things.
You might have done just as well if you slathered your hair with Crisco shortening and went to bed with your head wrapped in a plastic bag. While it's all well and good to use a quality shampoo to clean and moisturize your hair to make it look and feel nice, we have to remember that hair is made up of little more than dead cells. Other than to keep our hair clean, well groomed and occasionally apply some moisturizing conditioner to make it feel nice, there is little to nothing that can be done to "repair" hair. It's already dead!

How to remove it? The same way you would remove grease or oil... soap. Soaps and detergents that are made from sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) usually work best. I know that some people don't like to use SLS but, as long as you don't use it too frequently and only use it externally, it won't hurt you. It can make your hair and skin too dry because it is efficient at stripping away the naturally occurring oils. The worst it is likely to do is cause irritation if you use it too frequently. Just use SLS sparingly and not too often.

Dawn dish detergent is made from SLS. It works great at getting grease off dishes. It'll do the same to get grease off other things. Just don't overuse it.

Dr. Bronner's castile soap is not made from SLS. It's made from hemp oil, saponified with sodium hydroxide. It'll remove oil and grease but not quite as well as Dawn. You might have to do it twice if the dirt is heavy.

The Dr. Bronner company also makes an SLS-based cleaner called "Sal Suds." We use it around the house to clean up spills and cat puke. We mix it with water and put it in a spray bottle. When we need it, we spray it on, let it work for a minute then wipe with a clean cloth until the dirt is gone. It works well, exactly as it says on the label.

I don't know if I would use Sal Suds on my cat. I suppose if it was something that was particularly messy or potentially bad like automotive grease, I would. It probably won't hurt a cat but the label does say "For External Use Only - Not to be Used for Bathing." If it was an emergency, I would consider it. If it did use it, I would do so sparingly.

Since you have a couple of cats that are covered in grease and they are spreading it all around the house, I might consider this to be a "minor emergency." Go ahead and use it if you think it's necessary. Just read the label, follow instructions and use sparingly.

To be honest, if you already have some dish detergent like Dawn (or similar) I'd use that first. You already have some. You know the product, you know how it works and you already know how to use it.

No sense in going out to buy a new product just for a one-off use unless you think you'd like to try something new.

My opinion: Stick with what you know. :)
 
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