Growth on paw pad toes

white shadow

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Hi Mochiandme and welcome to the forum !

If what I'm seeing is a growth and, if it's what I'm thinking it appears to be........then, no, there's nothing that you yourself can - nor should try - to do about it.

It will require veterinary treatment to be resolved.

It isn't anything that requires emergency attention - it's something that needs to be seen to by a Vet who is well experienced with cats.


Now...........how 'bout some pics of the rest of her:hyper:
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Mochiandme

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Hi Mochiandme and welcome to the forum !

If what I'm seeing is a growth and, if it's what I'm thinking it appears to be........then, no, there's nothing that you yourself can - nor should try - to do about it.

It will require veterinary treatment to be resolved.

It isn't anything that requires emergency attention - it's something that needs to be seen to by a Vet who is well experienced with cats.


Now...........how 'bout some pics of the rest of her:hyper:
.
Lol we bottle fed her. She’s my baby girl :redheartpump:
 

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Caspers Human

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I'm not a vet but I have an idea about what this is.

When I was a kid, my father used to raise hunting dogs. I have seen something like this happen on a dog's paw.

I believe it's called a "cutaneous horn." We just used to call it a "paw horn."
It's generally benign. It's just something that happens to some animals.
It can also happen to people, too. :eek:

Nobody is totally sure why it happens but some people believe it is caused by friction against the skin.

Hunting dogs spend a lot of time running around on rough ground, climbing over things and putting a lot of wear and tear on their paws. A couple of our dogs would get growths similar to the one on your cat's paw.

Cutaneous horns aren't harmful, by themselves, but if they get injured on something they can become infected.
Cutaneous horns don't necessarily need treatment unless they become bothersome.
If it isn't causing your cat any pain and if it's not getting injured or infected, it'll probably be all right to leave well enough alone.

When our dogs used to get them, my father just took a razor blade and sliced them off! :eek:
But, the thing is, sometimes they would still grow back.

What you really need to do is have your vet look at your cat's paw just to be sure that it isn't something else.
If you think it might cause your cat any trouble, you can ask him to remove it.

Seriously, though! All my stories aside... it's probably nothing but you should still give your vet a call. :)
 
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Mochiandme

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Hi Mochiandme and welcome to the forum !

If what I'm seeing is a growth and, if it's what I'm thinking it appears to be........then, no, there's nothing that you yourself can - nor should try - to do about it.

It will require veterinary treatment to be resolved.

It isn't anything that requires emergency attention - it's something that needs to be seen to by a Vet who is well experienced with cats.


Now...........how 'bout some pics of the rest of her:hyper:
.
Can I ask what you believe it is? She's licking the wall now and she sometimes does that to the couch too. But it makes me nervous because I had a cat pass away from cancer. He was bottle fed and he never goes outside but he would go out on the patio and lick the concrete....because he needs minerals in him
Kisses for Star 💔
 

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Mochiandme

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I'm not a vet but I have an idea about what this is.

When I was a kid, my father used to raise hunting dogs. I have seen something like this happen on a dog's paw.

I believe it's called a "cutaneous horn." We just used to call it a "paw horn."
It's generally benign. It's just something that happens to some animals.
It can also happen to people, too. :eek:

Nobody is totally sure why it happens but some people believe it is caused by friction against the skin.

Hunting dogs spend a lot of time running around on rough ground, climbing over things and putting a lot of wear and tear on their paws. A couple of our dogs would get growths similar to the one on your cat's paw.

Cutaneous horns aren't harmful, by themselves, but if they get injured on something they can become infected.
Cutaneous horns don't necessarily need treatment unless they become bothersome.
If it isn't causing your cat any pain and if it's not getting injured or infected, it'll probably be all right to leave well enough alone.

When our dogs used to get them, my father just took a razor blade and sliced them off! :eek:
But, the thing is, sometimes they would still grow back.

What you really need to do is have your vet look at your cat's paw just to be sure that it isn't something else.
If you think it might cause your cat any trouble, you can ask him to remove it.

Seriously, though! All my stories aside... it's probably nothing but you should still give your vet a call. :)
Did it hurt when he would cut them off? Or bleed?
 

Caspers Human

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No, I don’t remember them bleeding.

I wasn’t suggesting that you cut off your cat”s growth. You need to talk to your vet before you do anything.

My father, pretty much, had his vet on speed dial, back in those days. I’m certain that he and the vet were in constant communication about this kind of thing. Raising hunting dogs for sale isn’t a cheap affair. Much as I speak casually about things he used to do, my father wouldn’t do anything that would risk his stock and trade.

The things I talk about are meant to give perspective and to help people understand things better, not to advise. (Unless I specifically say so.)

Just give your vet a phone call and ask. Since you have pictures, they might like it if you e-mailed them. If your vet thinks it’s a problem, they’ll tell you to come right in. If not, they might just tell you that they can look at it the next time you bring your cat in for a checkup.

I don’t believe this is a problem. My vote is for the latter.
 
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Mochiandme

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No, I don’t remember them bleeding.

I wasn’t suggesting that you cut off your cat”s growth. You need to talk to your vet before you do anything.

My father, pretty much, had his vet on speed dial, back in those days. I’m certain that he and the vet were in constant communication about this kind of thing. Raising hunting dogs for sale isn’t a cheap affair. Much as I speak casually about things he used to do, my father wouldn’t do anything that would risk his stock and trade.

The things I talk about are meant to give perspective and to help people understand things better, not to advise. (Unless I specifically say so.)

Just give your vet a phone call and ask. Since you have pictures, they might like it if you e-mailed them. If your vet thinks it’s a problem, they’ll tell you to come right in. If not, they might just tell you that they can look at it the next time you bring your cat in for a checkup.

I don’t believe this is a problem. My vote is for the latter.
Thank you I understand. I wish I had my vet on speed dial lol I volunteer at a vet clinic and I know how busy they are so I'll try to call.
 
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