Gingivitis in 16 month old cat

Madeline06

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My cat has just been seen at the vets for something else and some “severe gingivitis” was picked up. He’s only 16 months old and has logic gel daily. Is showing no pain or drooling and eats fine. I have 6 cats and now 5 of them have some levels of gingivitis. My oldest cat is only 3 years old, so my cats are all super young and I’m sad that they have these issues already.

with the 16 month old, the vet is already on about removing teeth?! Is she overreacting?I am going to get a second opinion with a different vet soon because this vet is always quite difficult and seems one of those that overreacts about everything. I just didn’t expect tooth extraction to be mentioned until my babies are much older and was a bit shocked to be honest.

what are your experiences with gingivitis in young cats?
 

Maurey

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If she’s on about removing teeth, could be that she suspects FORL. If she’s not a dental specialist, you should get a second opinion, regardless. FORL can’t always be accurately diagnosed without an x-ray, either. Dental health is largely genetic, so some cats start displaying issues quite young. Logic gel is a poor option for most animals prone to dental issues — gold standard is brushing at home with pet toothpaste; I use the Curaprox 1006 toothbrush and Virbac CET toothpaste.
Ideally all your cats with gingivitis should be seen by a dental professional before you start exposing them to brushing, though, as some may need a professional cleaning done under anaesthesia due to the extent of the buildup on their teeth.
 

Tik cat's mum

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I have a kitten who has gingivitis he's nearly 1 now. He was taken to the vet for a eye infection and the vet noticed his gums. He'd had to keep going back for repeated eye infections so the vet suggested testing him for FCV because that can cause issues with gum disease. His test came back positive and I was told to presume that my 4 year old has it too. I was told that teeth cleaning is a must so we went from brushing once a day to twice. At the moment we are managing with antimflamatrys when his gums are inflamed and just watch and wait. He has no plague build up just inflammation of his gums. He doesn't show any signs of discomfort but his gums can look very painful, cat's hide pain. It would be worth getting the young one tested that way you could either rule out FCV or know what your dealing with.
 

MissClouseau

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Are you brushing their teeth? If not, some level of gingivitis is definitely expected. It's common anyway - genes are believed to be a factor too so some cats get it earlier or more severe than the others. Some viral infections cats get as kittens also cause gingivitis and/or other dental issues. My cousin's one cat almost lost a tooth that way when he was less than a year old. I have seen quite a few street cats younger than 2 who had to have almost full tooth extraction as well.

That said, if he doesn't show any sign of pain and eats fine, it might be a better idea to first try brushing, dental treats, water additives, etc and re-check the situation again. I think you are totally right to get a second opinion from a different vet.
 

Antonio65

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A few questions.
Are all your cats related/siblings?
What are you feeding them?
Are they up-to-date with vaccinations?

I might be wrong, but sometimes a calicivirus infection could be mixed up with a gingivitis. If your cats are all fully vaccinated, but they are siblings, they could have got the virus before the first vaccine, and hence they aren't protected against that virus despite the shots.
If they are not vaccinated, then it could be a case of virus.
Also, some food give gums inflammation that can lead to bad gingivitis.

As for the tooth extraction, don't rush it, take your time and see if any medical treatment can fix the issue. Also, a dental cleaning could solve the problem. Like MissClouseau MissClouseau said, brushing your cats' teeth is a good way to save them from inflammation.
 
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Madeline06

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No I don’t brush their teeth, just using the logic gel at the moment, but will start brushing if it’s necessary after getting more advice etc.

we arebuying a house so in a unique period of 6 months where I can’t spend any money so I can’t do anything until all that has gone through anyway. I always have savings but for many reasons I can’t spend the cash at the moment. It’s different with other issues as the pet insurance covers that so I get the money back quite quickly.

once we have moved I plan on looking into this more and getting 2nd opinions etc. Unless he starts showing pain and drooling, then it would be a matter of urgency and we would find the money right now!

yea all my cats are vaccinated except my youngest (she has cat flu, I presume calici, spayed but not vaccinated yet as the vets want to wait another month or two just to be safe).

thanks everyone, will see how things go over the next few months and look into some more easy dental care for my babies other than the logic gel.
 
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Madeline06

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oh missed a couple of questions!

As said above - all vaccinated except for the youngest :)
Youngest 2 are siblings, both had calici when I got them, other 4 not related, only one has had calici (limping calici after a vaccine). The 16 month old with gingivitis has never shown signs of calici before.
All up to date with vaccines, religiously!
They eat royal canin hypoallergenic dry food and Almo nature chicken mousse wet twice a day.


A few questions.
Are all your cats related/siblings?
What are you feeding them?
Are they up-to-date with vaccinations?

I might be wrong, but sometimes a calicivirus infection could be mixed up with a gingivitis. If your cats are all fully vaccinated, but they are siblings, they could have got the virus before the first vaccine, and hence they aren't protected against that virus despite the shots.
If they are not vaccinated, then it could be a case of virus.
Also, some food give gums inflammation that can lead to bad gingivitis.

As for the tooth extraction, don't rush it, take your time and see if any medical treatment can fix the issue. Also, a dental cleaning could solve the problem. Like MissClouseau MissClouseau said, brushing your cats' teeth is a good way to save them from inflammation.
 
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Madeline06

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Update - found a finger toothbrush that came with the logic gel. Just managed to brush all 6 cats teeth! Got them when they were sleepy. Maybe not for as long as needed but it’s a start. I’ll start brushing daily as this has really opened my eyes. I’ve ordered the virbac toothbrush and toothpaste kit fish flavour :)
 

Antonio65

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Update - found a finger toothbrush that came with the logic gel. Just managed to brush all 6 cats teeth! Got them when they were sleepy. Maybe not for as long as needed but it’s a start. I’ll start brushing daily as this has really opened my eyes. I’ve ordered the virbac toothbrush and toothpaste kit fish flavour :)
I checked the label for Logic Gel (that I didn't know) and it says:
Logic Oral Hygiene Gel Pet Toothpaste is a true veterinary toothpaste, achieves results without brushing your pets teeth.
Whilst brushing the teeth is known to be the most effective means of removing plaque, this is not always possible.
Logic oral hygiene gel contains a multi enzyme complex which works on the plaque helping to destroy existing plaque and prevent the formation of new plaque.
The gel also contains a mild abrasive, whilst the gel itself boosts the action of saliva. Supplied in a tube with applicator to allow direct application to the teeth.

It doesn't say it helps with gums inflammation.

My cat had some gingivitis (later diagnosed as a consequence of calicivirus) and was prescribed another product, Restomyl Gel, the label says
Useful for relieving mucosal irritation and redness, secondary to oral problems and specialist dental procedures (e.g. dental scaling and polishing, tooth extractions, reduction of periodontal pockets). For dogs and cats.

I think you could try a similar product that soothes the inflammation, along with the toothpaste you are using.
 
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