Finally Had Enough

dandelion22

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I have decided that Sheena, the alpha bully in our household, has to go. I just had a few questions for the wise readers here! In the contract that I signed when I adopted the two sisters from a shelter, it says that they are a bonded pair and must not be separated. They are definitely not bonded; they avoid each other and sleep in separate rooms, or Sheena intimidates the smaller cat or attacks her. If you read my past posts, I have been dealing with the bullying for three years and I am done.

My question is, before I approach the place I adopted them from, do I need to worry about breaking a contract and being penalized? I don't want to re-home both cats, just the problem one. I am positive that she would thrive in a single cat household, and that the bullied cat can finally relax and thrive without her sister. Has anyone else run into problems with returning a cat to the adoption agency? Thanks!
 

FeebysOwner

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I am not familiar with these 'contracts', but certainly they 'run out' after a period of time? You could call and ask the details, if they are not in your contract. The other thing to consider is that you waited three years to decide to get rid of one the two 'bonded' cats, so that may also play into what kind of response/reaction you get.

If you should find out that enough time has lapsed with the initial agreement, have you considered looking for other options to find a home for Sheena, if you truly believe she is better suited to a home as an only cat?

I think that rather than assume you need to return Sheena to the original adoption center, that you thoroughly investigate other possible options for rehoming. That might go a long way in helping her to find another home - with or without the initial adoption center.
 
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dandelion22

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Thank you for responding! The contract I mentioned is something commonly done when adopting through an agency, which is what I did. The contract is legal and binding, since it was signed by both myself and the foster parents of the cats. The agreement is that I return the cats to them if I decided I can't keep them anymore, and there is a bonded pair stipulation that they not be separated.

I was trying to find out if anyone else that posts here had signed a similar contract, and if it caused problems in trying to re-home the pet.
 

Furballsmom

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Hi, I know this isn't the answer to your question but I would talk to them first, including to the foster if they allow that. Describe the current situation of the two cats' totally non-bonded behavior, that you've been dealing with this for years, etc.

Just to mention, you really want to be able to go through the shelter rather than rehoming this cat yourself. They have the screening process down to a pretty good science, and if you were to post in social media, you have to do the screening yourself.

This article applies for adults as well;

"Kittens To Good Homes" - How To Find A Good Forever Home For Your Kittens - TheCatSite
 
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cmshap

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This is an interesting issue, but like Furballsmom Furballsmom said, try honest communication first. Signed agreements can be legally thrown out if both parties agree to new terms. Don't necessarily feel like you have absolutely zero other options.

You can, of course, be held to the contract you signed, but it's not set in stone if both parties come to an agreement to change it.

That's just my two cents, which may not be helpful, but I'd try talking to the other parties first.
 
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dandelion22

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I guess I will have to speak to them. I didn't want to try re-homing the cat on my own, because there are weird people out there, lol. I would trust this agency because they delivered both cats to my house after I had gone through the other steps, and they also asked to be shown through the house to make sure it was a good fit.

The cat I want to re-home is a darling when she isn't being a bully. I am sure that someone will fall in love with her just as I did. My health just can't take this constant stress between the two fur babies, and it can't be good for them, either.
 

cmshap

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The cat I want to re-home is a darling when she isn't being a bully. I am sure that someone will fall in love with her just as I did. My health just can't take this constant stress between the two fur babies, and it can't be good for them, either.
Yeah, your intentions are good, and it's a good idea to rehome through a shelter.

I just don't understand why anyone would draw up a contract saying "these two cats must never be separated." That makes no sense. I am relatively a cat-novice (currently living with my first cat, ever), but I've sucked up a lot of information from this forum and other sources, and even I know that sometimes, individual cats will just never get along. Despite patiently following all the best practices involved with multiple-cat households.

Also, environment alone can change things. Two cats might get along at a shelter, where there really isn't any room to be more comfortable and territorial... then you move them to a larger home, and their behavior changes. Anybody who knows anything about cats should realize this (not referring to you, but to whomever wrote up this contract).

That's why I suggest talking about it first, and bring all the specific things you've tried and observed as ammo for the conversation.
 

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Because truly bonded pairs will pine and never be happy again without their bonded friend. Some will stop eating, some will just go under the furniture and not come out willingly. They won't bond to the person that takes them because the separation seems to have taught them that bonding is dangerous.
 

jclark

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I have decided that Sheena, the alpha bully in our household, has to go. I just had a few questions for the wise readers here! In the contract that I signed when I adopted the two sisters from a shelter, it says that they are a bonded pair and must not be separated. They are definitely not bonded; they avoid each other and sleep in separate rooms, or Sheena intimidates the smaller cat or attacks her. If you read my past posts, I have been dealing with the bullying for three years and I am done.

My question is, before I approach the place I adopted them from, do I need to worry about breaking a contract and being penalized? I don't want to re-home both cats, just the problem one. I am positive that she would thrive in a single cat household, and that the bullied cat can finally relax and thrive without her sister. Has anyone else run into problems with returning a cat to the adoption agency? Thanks!
Do what you want. Cats aren't guaranteed to remain bonded as they age. My, littermates, are 10 yrs old and tolerate each other. Long gone are the days of grooming and sleeping with each other
 

cmshap

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Because truly bonded pairs will pine and never be happy again without their bonded friend. Some will stop eating, some will just go under the furniture and not come out willingly. They won't bond to the person that takes them because the separation seems to have taught them that bonding is dangerous.
Well, who decides what makes a bonded pair? And under what conditions?

Also, what determines that they will remain a bonded pair after being moved to a new home?

My point is that this situation can change. I don't know everything that dandelion22 dandelion22 has tried, but they said they've been at it for three years.

Surely, the "bonded pair" thing has a chance of not being permanent, depending on conditions.
 
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dandelion22

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I agree with most points made here! I have siblings whom I never contact and that I don't get along with at all, despite growing up with them, lol. Nobody expects litter mates to love each other to the end. I am going to try asking in a legal forum what the possible ramifications would be if i separate the two cats. I am positive that the smaller cat won't miss her sister; possibly will be peering over her shoulder for quite some time, if anything.
 

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My cat Maggie is not over weight,like a mini leapord. Peaches is small,7 pds. Same issue with my cats. I can understand why you want to rehome. Peaches is ruler over my apartment. She has come to accept Maggie,yes,there is fighting but not as much. If I understand right, Zoe does not stand up for herself. I clicker trained Maggie to come when called. They are now senior. Peaches used to sleep on my bed and growl if Maggie got on. Now Maggie sleeps with me. Hope things work out for you
 

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Contact the rescue. Like most rescues, our contract states that a cat must be returned to us rather than being rehomed. This is so that the potential new home and owners are properly researched. You would have difficulty doing so on your own as vets etc probably would not respond to your inquiry. I believe the rescue would consider taking just one cat back. Why would they want to rehome two cats? Call.
 
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dandelion22

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Contact the rescue. Like most rescues, our contract states that a cat must be returned to us rather than being rehomed. This is so that the potential new home and owners are properly researched. You would have difficulty doing so on your own as vets etc probably would not respond to your inquiry. I believe the rescue would consider taking just one cat back. Why would they want to rehome two cats? Call.
I think you are right. I am contacting them tonight, as I still have all their info.
 

Kwik

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dandelion22 dandelion22
So I'm going to ask a stupid question-Im thinking when you realized these cats did not get along you must've contacted the shelter in the past -right? I've not read any of your past posts regarding the issues you've had for 3 years but it seems to me that contract was breached because they were not a bonded pair from the start..... the only issue will be why you waited 3 yrs if you've not reached out to them before now

I'm not mentioning this to be disrespectful,only bring it up in the hopes you have told them about this problem before and that would be in your favor
 

cmshap

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I've not read any of your past posts regarding the issues you've had for 3 years but it seems to me that contract was breached because they were not a bonded pair from the start..... the only issue will be why you waited 3 yrs if you've not reached out to them before now
This is exactly the point I was trying to make.

Some human, probably one person, decided that these two cats were a bonded pair while they were in a shelter. This human may have had good intentions... they probably were just trying to make sure that both cats were adopted to a loving home, instead of one being left in the shelter.

But like I said, circumstances can change drastically after moving cats to a new home. I personally don't know much other than what I read here and on other sources, and I've only ever lived with one cat, but I KNOW that you cannot guarantee cats will get along in all circumstances.

Kwik Kwik 's point is a good one, that the cats are simply not behaving like a bonded pair. And if you are giving them territory and space to live comfortably, you aren't doing anything wrong. I would contest the "bonded pair" claim.
 

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I have decided that Sheena, the alpha bully in our household, has to go. I just had a few questions for the wise readers here! In the contract that I signed when I adopted the two sisters from a shelter, it says that they are a bonded pair and must not be separated. They are definitely not bonded; they avoid each other and sleep in separate rooms, or Sheena intimidates the smaller cat or attacks her. If you read my past posts, I have been dealing with the bullying for three years and I am done.

My question is, before I approach the place I adopted them from, do I need to worry about breaking a contract and being penalized? I don't want to re-home both cats, just the problem one. I am positive that she would thrive in a single cat household, and that the bullied cat can finally relax and thrive without her sister. Has anyone else run into problems with returning a cat to the adoption agency? Thanks!
Since it is a contract, you'll need legal advice from someone in your area. (State/province/country/etc)

Even if someone on the site has experience, it'll likely differ from place to place as laws do.
 

Alldara

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dandelion22 dandelion22 Just to add...try to get a free consultation with someone, not just a legal forum. On a legal forum you have no way of knowing if someone even is allowed to practice law or provide legal advice.

Looking forward to hearing what the rescue decides though.
 

Alldara

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cmshap cmshap Usually bonded pairs play with, sleep with and groom eachother daily. But a big sign will usually be distress if the other one is gone.

I have to agree that it seems some places will categorize any animal that co-exsists well together as bonded sometimes. Nobel and Lily used to groom one another and play for example. Even cuddle but they were never bonded. Nobel was still sad when she passed.

It's a very different experience watching a bonded pair. I think "having a bond" and "bonded pair" are two different things, frequently confused.
 
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