Feline Polycythemia Vera

sanglupus

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A few days ago my cat who just had her 4th birthday had a sudden seizure. When I first saw her I thought she had broken a limb or her back and was trying to get back up, it was terrifying. I ran to help, and probe various bones but couldn't find anything wrong, and then a few seconds later it was like nothing had happened. Actually, she was able to stand up and walk away with a degree of uncertainty in her step, but not like she was experiencing any pain at all.

We took her to the vet, and had some traditional bloodwork done and found that her red blood cell count was abnormally high. This was a bit of a surprise considering only 6 months ago blood work was done due to a kidney condition she had developed which had left her rather dehydrated and needing subcutaneous fluids. Now though, she seems totally fine, I mean completely normal. Like her normal self, however the vet is telling me that she will be needing a phlebotomy every month in order to maintain her blood count at a level that her brain will be able to tolerate.

They are talking about pulling something like 100ml of blood every month (and that's the "conservative" amount) or administering some oxyurea every day for the rest of her life. The treatment that they are looking at will wind up costing basically 400 dollars a month due to the time that the procedure will take. Does this make any sense to anyone? When we had taken her to the doctor the last time, she was definitely very sick, and got better very quickly following antibiotics, but could a kidney infection of that severity prompt this kind of condition 6 months later? We already had an x-ray done to check for kidney abnormalities, and an ultrasound done afterwards just to be sure, but nothing showed up. Her lungs appeared completely normal so she isn't suffering from a lack of oxygen uptake from what they can tell... and as far as I can ascertain they don't understand anything about the condition and have to refer to specialists way out in bumble to figure out treatment plans... ARGHHHHH someone with half a veterinary brain help me out, or anyone that has ever dealt with this before. Basically the condition means that her bone marrow is producing more red blood cells by almost double what she needs which is leading to a difficulty in blood flow through smaller capillaries and could potentially lead to a stroke. Anyone have any ideas please? :(

We are hoping that there has to be some other explanation for the increased RBC count, would a marrow test indicate a problem?  Or would it also test positive if she was producing more blood due to allergies or low oxygen?  She likes sleeping under blankets... would that lead to low oxygen? :(
 

Willowy

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I know someone (a human :tongue2:) with polycythemia vera. The doctors take a few pints of blood every couple weeks. But I don't think that costs him $400 a month! No reason taking blood should cost that much for a cat either.

I'm not sure of other causes, sorry :(. Maybe a specialist would be helpful.
 
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sanglupus

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Yeah, I was hoping that someone might have had some experience with this in felines.  The less people that seem to respond, the less I think this vet has any idea what they are talking about.
 

amundaloo

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Hello!

I have worked at a veterinary clinic for years and have 2 cats; one of which has just been diagnosed as having primary Polycythemia Vera. This condition is either primary (caused by a genetic mutation) or secondary (caused by "something" else). Red blood cells will elevate when your feline is dehydrated (and you mentioned your feline has been recently treated with fluid therapy), which is obvious from clinical observation, or is facing a period of acute stress, due to splenic contractions. If it is due to acute stress (and I mean something as stressful as a cat fight or getting hit by a car), you should note a spike in the RBC count of not more than 15% (where normal RBC counts are 35%). So, that being said, we should only see up to 50% RBC in even the most stressful times. If the count is any higher, there is an underlying cause.

It really seems as though your vet has done the most appropriate diagnostics to rule out any secondary causes of the suspiciously high RBC count. Ultrasound is used to rule out a tumor on the kidney, which is a surefire way to have a dramatic increase in RBC counts. X-rays are used to rule out a cardiac condition that is effecting the way oxygen is diffused throughout the body, which would also dramatically increase RBC counts. Once these diagnostics are done (and believe me, I know first-hand the expense associated with these diagnostics) and they are negative (and in your feline's situation, they are), your vet can make the appropriate diagnosis of primary Polycythemia Vera. Yes, this is a very rare condition, and, yes, this condition is classified as a chronic type of leukemia; however, it is treatable with proper medical intervention. The vet at my clinic has never seen a case of primary Polycythemia Vera since she started practicing 20 years ago.

The only safe way to really treat Polycythemia Vera is by phlebotomy (drawing out some of the blood in order to decrease the packed cell volume, which will inevitably kill your cat if you just "leave it"). There is some evidence to show that 2 different medications may actually help keep the RBC count at bay (and this is only appropriate once phlebotomies are done and RBC counts are in the desirable range), BUT they are KNOWN teratogens. Teratogens are responsible for causing birth defects and apparent sterility in men. I do not know your personal situation but if you are planning on having a family, I would strongly suggest that you NOT use hydroxyurea and opt for spending the money and conduct periodic bloodwork to evaluate CBCs to check the level of RBC counts. Once the counts get too high, the vet will perform a phlebotomy. I noticed that someone commented on the $400 price tag just to "draw blood". NO. That is far from what a phlebotomy is. When you draw the amount of blood that is needed to perform a phlebotomy, you must replace with saline or the body will go into shock. ALSO, because you are drawing blood (not just the RBC), you are withdrawing all the good stuff; that is, the plasma in the blood that carries all vitamins and nutrients. To avoid this, you must ensure that you are using vitamin supplements to help support your feline. Unfortunately, there is no way for a vet to tell you how often this needs to be done because, like all cancers, each is different. Each animal will generate RBCs at their own rate. Sometimes they (phlebotomies) need to be done every couple weeks but some only need it to be done every 8 weeks or so. 

It will not be an easy road (or an inexpensive one), but if you love your critter and wish to keep her alive, you will do what you have to do. I was horrified to learn that my cat has this condition but luckily she is asymptomatic (also very odd, given the fact that the condition usually presents with some clinical signs - like seizures, lethargy, overall malaise) and as long as she's happy, I will continue to treat her. I would be GLAD to answer any questions you have. I love what I do and I especially enjoy educating people about their pets. Feel free to PM me if you'd like to discuss further. 

I wish you the best of luck and hope for the best. 

Amanda
 
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lunarleslie

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Hello -

My boy Motley has polycythemia vera and he is starting hydroxyurea next week. You mentioned you have a lot of experience with this disease...was your kitty on this medication? I am very nervous to put him on this cancer drug and there is so little information out there and so few people have had personal experience with it. Any advice or comments would be appreciated! Thank you - Leslie
 

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Hi there,

I thought long and hard about hydroxyurea and decided against it only because it is a teratogen (known to cause birth defects). I'm still a young woman and intend on having children so my vet was very hesitant to even suggest the medication. Hydroxyurea is really the only medication that is indicated for Polycythemia Vera so I imagine you will have some success on this medication. With my kitty, we opted to monitor her RBC levels once each month and, when they get higher than ~70%, we have the phlebotomy done. It seems as though my kitty is on a 7-8 month cycle so I guess we're very lucky. Because of the rarity of this disease my vet had to consult with lab experts and they initially told her that these phlebotomies would likely have to be done every 3-6 WEEKS!!! We were shocked and obviously so upset for my kitty. I am in a unique situation because I do some work for my vet each month and, in exchange, I get "free" veterinary care. I'm also a little lucky that my kitty doesn't seem to have a really vicious case of this disease and just the full vials of blood that we draw each month seem to help regulate the RBC levels a little. Plus, I'm able to take the blood myself at home and just bring the vial in with me, which is excellent for my kitty. Obviously there aren't very many people that have the opportunity to do this and doing bloodwork and phlebotomies so often would render many people broke. My opinion: try the hydroxyurea, even just on a trial basis to see how it goes...unfortunately, we don't have many treatment options! When was your kitty diagnosed, did you do other tests to rule out other reasons for the high RBC?
 

lunarleslie

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Thank you for your reply!

Motley had a blood test last March for something else which revealed an elevated PCV of  69%. I had many other tests done (x-rays, ultrasound, more blood work). He does have a slightly enlarged heart but the vets don't seem to think this is the primary cause, thus, we are treating it as primary polycythemia. He has had a few phlebotomies since March which bring his levels down to the high 50s. I didn't want to try hydroxyurea unless we absolutely had to. Unfortunately his PCV seems to rise quickly, anywhere from 1.5-3 months and it isn't ideal for him to have phlebotomies that frequently because he has to be put under. Then, a few weeks ago, shortly after a phlebotomy, he had a seizure. It was very scary but he recovered and hasn't had another one since.

He will start on hydroxy next week with close monitoring of his WBCs, RBCs and platelets. If anything seems to go askew I will simply take him off the medication and proceed with phlebotomies. I am just really hoping the medication works and that he tolerates it well. He is a healthy and happy boy...he doesn't know that he's sick and is very tired of going to the vet (he absolutely hates it!) so I am hoping we can get this thing under control. I am also a female of child bearing age, but will wear gloves when administering and just be very careful with it.

It's also hard because the disease is SO rare so there isn't a lot of support or literature/research on cats who have the condition. Also, most vets have had no experience with this disease so it's just a lot of guessing and trail and error.

How is your kitty doing these days?

Thanks,

Leslie
 

acacia15

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About 10 years ago when he wast 2.5 years old, my male cat Chance developed polycythemia vera. His RBC was at 70% when they did his first blood test. After a bone marrow test that determined his disease was of unknown origin, the vet recommended that we put him hydroxyurea. As I write this paragraph, it sounds like it was all so simple -- but it wasn't! It was many days of touch and go, crying, and the complete unknown as the doctors tried to determine what was wrong with him and if a short or long term treatment plan was even available.

After the initial scare and development of a treatment plan, we brought him in for blood tests about every 4-6 months to make sure that his levels were remaining consistent while on the medication. The frequency of his drug dose changed over the years. Ultimately, we were able to keep his blood level in the normal range by giving him one pill a week. And thankfully, he has a plastic obsession and the pill was a capsule, so he considered it a treat. So did I because pilling this cat every week would not have been easy!

After about 9 years of being on the drug -- it stopped working for him and his red blood count rose and he showed the same symptoms as the first time: lethargy, loss of limb movement, heavy blinking.

We tested the last dose of meds to see if they were correct. They were. We tried some other medication that made him completely stop eating. We were running out of options. 

The doctors told us that at that point, the only way to keep him red blood cell count in the normal range was to do a phlebotomy every 4 weeks. It was a tough decision. It meant one day a month he was brought to the vet for a few hours while they did this treatment. Would we be doing this for us or for the cat? After much discussion, we decided that since the other 29 days of his life were still fun for him, we went ahead with the phlebotomy plan.

Unfortunately, after about a year of phlebotomies, there was too much scar tissue in his veins for the specialists to get enough blood. We looked into a few options that would have turned him into "Franken-cat" and we decided instead that we would keep him happy and comfortable until his RBC got too high for him to survive and then we'd put his to sleep.

Unbelievably, after the first month on his own without blood draws, he was fine. Another month went by and still no tell-tale behavior of high red blood cells. I took him in for blood tests to check his levels, and he had mysteriously leveled off in the safe (for him) range of high 40s/low 50s.

Even his internist was surprised. Her though was that his bone marrow had been overproducing red cells for so many years that it finally gave up. 

For Chance, he's lived the last year phlebotomy and medication free, and has only been subjected to 2 blood tests -- both of which came back with good numbers.

In the many cases that our internist has seen of cats with polycythemia vera, Chance is the only one who stopped the over production. He's due for another blood test next week, and I'm hopeful that he'll have good numbers once again, as his behavior is completely  normal.

We know he won't be around forever, so every month he's still here we are happy to have him in our lives. And in the 12 years of his life so far -- he's proven to be quite the incredible cat.

I wish you luck with your cat. 
 

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Thank you SO much! I cannot tell you how much I appreciate your response. I have felt so alone in dealing with this disease and am so thankful to have found someone willing to share their experience.

It gives me much hope to know that Chance did so well on the meds for 9 years. Motley has been on the meds for two weeks now and seems to be doing well. I give him the liquid form and he actually really likes it, which is no small blessing! He is 9 years old, so if he could go for a good number of years on the medication I would be so happy.

I'm so glad to hear that Chance seems to have spontaneously gone into remission. Talk about a medical miracle. I hope his levels continue to remain in a safe range. Sounds like he has been through a lot and is so lucky to have owners (or servants as I tend to think of myself) who not only are willing to go through the time, expense and emotions in dealing with this, but also know that his quality of life is ultimately the most important consideration.

With Motley, I too, am just trying to be grateful for the time I had and time I still have with him. As long as his quality of life is good I will continue to do whatever I need to do in terms of keeping his levels in check.

Wishing you and Chance all the best!

Leslie
 

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Thank you all very much for these postings.  I have an 8 year old male cat named Valo, who is like a child to me.  4 days ago, I took him and his brother to the vet for a routine wellness checkup.  Since they suggested blood work be done in cats older than 7 years, I agreed.  Yesterday, my very loving vet called me with the bad news: elevated RBCs, and all that goes with it.  His RBCs were extremely high, hematocrit was 70 and hemoglobin also extremely high, and MCV and MCH levels were low.  I brought Valo back to the vet within an hour, so they could retest his blood.  This time, his hematocrit was 78.  My vet suggested the "blood letting" procedure to buy us time until I could get him into a specialist for an ultrasound.  I agreed.  Valo has showed absolutely no symptoms of any problems whatsoever.  This poor baby has the sweetest personality on earth.  He's a 15 pound lap cat.  When he was only a year old, he went through numerous tests and over a month without eating or drinking on his own until, finally, a specialist diagnosed him with pancreatitis.  He (luckily) hasn't had any complications since then.  He also has food allergies, so I feed him ZD, a special low-allergen food from my vet.  I take him to the vet often, get him all his vaccines, and take care of him as if he were literally my child, so it kills me that he is going through this now.  I can't get him into the specialist for 6 more days, so in the meantime, I've done my research and found some pretty horrifying things.  Reading all of your responses makes me feel a little bit better.  After reading that this polycythemia could be caused by a kidney tumor or bone marrow cancer, and then reading the prognosis for both of those issues, I'm finding it difficult to do anything but hold him and cry.  I also read an article on petMD about "transient" polycythemia, which from what I gathered is a response to an abnormal spike in epinephrine brought on by stress.  Could this possibly be the problem? He HATES his cat carrier...it is a struggle to get him in there.  He HATES the car, and he DESPISES the vet.  His poor little body shakes the entire time we're there.  So when they did this last blood test, I had to help the vet tech hold him down, while the vet pulled his leg out and prodded around trying to find a vein to draw blood from.  This had to be extremely stressful for him.  We could all feel him shaking.  I'm just not sure if stress could cause his hematocrit to be 78...that's really high.  Also, there's really no way to tell if it is the "transient" type, because there will never be a time he's calm at the vet.  After the blood letting, his hematocrit was at 60.  He will get his ultrasound in 6 days, and I'm praying and begging that it's not a kidney problem, because pretty much everything else I read seemed manageable.

Thank you all again, I'm hoping that I will get similar news from the ultrasound and I can keep my furry baby with me for many more years.

-Natalie
 

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Hi Natalie,

I am so sorry to hear about Valo - I know how scary this is. My cats are also very much my children. Valo and his brother are so very lucky to have a mom like you!

From the time I found out about Motley's elevated RBCs, through all of the tests, and the "let's wait and see if this medicine works" phase, I was a complete wreck. I think of the emotional roller coaster I went through almost exactly a year ago and it's not a pleasant memory. My best advice to you is try, as hard as it is, try to remain positive and calm, for Valo's sake if not your own.

I was so worried it was a kidney tumor too. After the ultrasound results showed that it was not, I was somewhat relieved but still a basket case. 

Between the initial test results and myriad of tests, Motley had a few phlebotomies (blood letting) to keep his blood from getting too sludgy. He actually did have one seizure (which can happen with blood that is too thick) during this time - oh my lord was that not the scariest thing ever!

Motley also HATES, DESPISES the vet. I am not a vet by any stretch of the imagination, but I do not think even a high level of stress could produce those hematocrit levels.  BUT I could be wrong. 

He is in the safe zone for now (since his RBCs are now in at an acceptable level). So please, PLEASE, try to relax while you wait until your appt with the specialist. I was so wound up, anxious and afraid that I think my neurosis made Motley sick as he went through a week of eating very little and lethargy. I had to go out of town on business, and my mom stayed at my house and watched my boys. A couple days after I was gone Motley returned to normal. I think it was because my mom wasn't hovering around him like a crazy person and crying all the time. As you know, these guys are very sensitive souls and it is so important that we keep a calm, positive vibe for them, no matter how hard it is for us! 

Will you let me know the results of the ultrasound? If normal, and if he ends up being diagnosed with polycythemia vera (I'm sure you've read about that in your research) I would be more than happy to discuss with you my experience with it. 

Take care,

Leslie
 

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Hi Leslie,

Thank you so much for your kind words and encouraging message.  It really does help me to hear from people who love their cats as much as I love mine.  I'm so happy that Motley is doing well! Valo is still in good spirits- running around, chasing the other cats, climbing the furniture, and attacking my hair.  I will do my best to mirror his spirits so I don't cause him any anxiety.  I will definitely let you know the test results when I get them on Wednesday.  Give Motley a pat on the head for me! Talk to you soon.

-Natalie
 

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I was just searching "polycythemia Vera" and came accross your post, as we just brought our 5 year old male cat home after a 2 day stay at the vet. Today they performed a "letting" or phlebotomy on him, which the person who posted below (Amundaloo?) is absolutely correct in saying it is NOT just drawing blood.  honestly, I wish I could say that we paid $400 for this today but our bill was more to the tune of almost $900.  Our vet too had never seen a case of this and was perplexed by it at first.  We are still awaiting test to see if this is the actual diagnosis or if there is another underlying problem such as a kidney tumor. The treatment for the Polycythemia we were told is a drug called Hydroxyurea daily for the first month or so, then 3 times a week after that for lifetime.  Also, bloodwork every week for the first month and then monthly and so on.  I wish you the best of luck with your cat..I can imagine what your feeling and my heart goes out to you..
 

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I can certainly understand the worry that comes with this diagnosis...there really is very little literature about this extremely rare disease. I posted quite a while ago and my kitty, Hercules, and just wanted to let everyone know that she has been doing well with this condition! I manage a veterinary practice so I do have the benefit of drawing blood at home and bringing it into work to have her complete blood counts tested (absolutely limited stress for Hercules and I'm so grateful for this). I do this once a month (I think the frequent blood draws have somewhat helped the RBC counts). Hercules was diagnosed January 2013 and I've done 3 phelbotomies since (as of March) - it seems that Hercules needs them every 6 months. I never started the Hydroxyurea and would only consider this if the phlebotomies were no longer an option for her. 

I do find it strange that some animals exhibit symptoms of the disease and others don't. Hercules didn't exhibit a single symptom, not even decreased energy. In fact, her biological sister (same age) sleeps more than she does. I was truly shocked when I saw her blood counts - she should have been obviously clinically ill but she wasn't! The only reason my cat was diagnosed with this disease was because I had preanesthetic bloodwork done before a routine dental cleaning! It was an absolute and total fluke. 

The question about the possibility of stress raising RBC count: yes but only about 10%. Actually, dogs exhibit more pronounced splenic contractions during stressful events (i.e. visit to the vet clinic), which account for higher RBC counts. If Polycythemia Vera is being considered, it's because it is an impossibility that stress is the root cause (though I wish so badly that I could say otherwise). If the ultrasound shows no mass on the kidney and there aren't any obvious reasons for the increased RBCs (i.e. dehydration), it really points to true Polycythemia Vera. 

Acacia15 - what a great story! Your story was actually really heartwarming. Honestly, if his CBC stay in a normal range, who's to say Chance won't live to be 20? I'd say that there's a chance for Chance (lol)!

lunarleslie, natattaack & Kshaw - I also love that there are people out there that love their cats like I love mine. I wouldn't think twice to do everything I could for my girl. How are your kitties managing? I know trips to the clinics can really stress out kitties; has anyone tried spraying the cat carriers with some pheromones like Feliway? It may help a little - and a little goes a long way.
 

adelheid

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Hello,

my poor little cat has been diagnosed with  'Polycythermia Vera'.  We just found out on Thursday evening, he seemed to be well until he had a fit on Thursday morning and another one on Thursday evening at an Animal Hospital.  He is only 6 years old - he is still in hospital now, they draw blood a few times now- initially the red blood platelets were 70%, then 60% and today up again to 65%.  The vet who phoned me earlier said that they will take blood again - she thinks it is not unusual that this happens first.  If this happens again, then they have to treat him with 'Hydroxyurea'.  Has anyone got experience with these tablets and how long can a cat live on this treatment?  

The hospital fees will be very expensive - I am a pensioner and can't afford thousands of pounds every month.  Of course, I want to help my little cat to get better but should there be just lots of pain and not much improvement, I sadly have to think again.

Thank you for any answers

Adelheid
 

gomezopotamia

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Hey Adelheid:) My cat was also diagnosed with this back in April. I haven't posted about him to the forum because his backstory is quite long a complicated.

But when we first discovered it, his blood count was 73. Since the beginning of April we have had three phlebotomies total. He seems to regenerate 5-6 points a week. He actually just started on Hydroxyurea last week. He went in for a CBC today, but it may take some time for the medication to suppress the bone marrow. I'll be sure to keep you updated on how he does with the hydroxyurea so you'll know what to expect. So far he hasn't had any vomiting, diarrhea, or nausea. But he does seem a bit more sleepy than normal. The medication is also reasonably adorable. I believe it was about $40ish for a months supply. It will certainly be a difficult journay.

Does your cat have any other side effects? Please keep us posted. This is one very strange and difficult disease, but it's possible to manage it. Take care.

Angela
 

adelheid

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Hello!

I have worked at a veterinary clinic for years and have 2 cats; one of which has just been diagnosed as having primary Polycythemia Vera. This condition is either primary (caused by a genetic mutation) or secondary (caused by "something" else). Red blood cells will elevate when your feline is dehydrated (and you mentioned your feline has been recently treated with fluid therapy), which is obvious from clinical observation, or is facing a period of acute stress, due to splenic contractions. If it is due to acute stress (and I mean something as stressful as a cat fight or getting hit by a car), you should note a spike in the RBC count of not more than 15% (where normal RBC counts are 35%). So, that being said, we should only see up to 50% RBC in even the most stressful times. If the count is any higher, there is an underlying cause.

It really seems as though your vet has done the most appropriate diagnostics to rule out any secondary causes of the suspiciously high RBC count. Ultrasound is used to rule out a tumor on the kidney, which is a surefire way to have a dramatic increase in RBC counts. X-rays are used to rule out a cardiac condition that is effecting the way oxygen is diffused throughout the body, which would also dramatically increase RBC counts. Once these diagnostics are done (and believe me, I know first-hand the expense associated with these diagnostics) and they are negative (and in your feline's situation, they are), your vet can make the appropriate diagnosis of primary Polycythemia Vera. Yes, this is a very rare condition, and, yes, this condition is classified as a chronic type of leukemia; however, it is treatable with proper medical intervention. The vet at my clinic has never seen a case of primary Polycythemia Vera since she started practicing 20 years ago.

The only safe way to really treat Polycythemia Vera is by phlebotomy (drawing out some of the blood in order to decrease the packed cell volume, which will inevitably kill your cat if you just "leave it"). There is some evidence to show that 2 different medications may actually help keep the RBC count at bay (and this is only appropriate once phlebotomies are done and RBC counts are in the desirable range), BUT they are KNOWN teratogens. Teratogens are responsible for causing birth defects and apparent sterility in men. I do not know your personal situation but if you are planning on having a family, I would strongly suggest that you NOT use hydroxyurea and opt for spending the money and conduct periodic bloodwork to evaluate CBCs to check the level of RBC counts. Once the counts get too high, the vet will perform a phlebotomy. I noticed that someone commented on the $400 price tag just to "draw blood". NO. That is far from what a phlebotomy is. When you draw the amount of blood that is needed to perform a phlebotomy, you must replace with saline or the body will go into shock. ALSO, because you are drawing blood (not just the RBC), you are withdrawing all the good stuff; that is, the plasma in the blood that carries all vitamins and nutrients. To avoid this, you must ensure that you are using vitamin supplements to help support your feline. Unfortunately, there is no way for a vet to tell you how often this needs to be done because, like all cancers, each is different. Each animal will generate RBCs at their own rate. Sometimes they (phlebotomies) need to be done every couple weeks but some only need it to be done every 8 weeks or so. 

It will not be an easy road (or an inexpensive one), but if you love your critter and wish to keep her alive, you will do what you have to do. I was horrified to learn that my cat has this condition but luckily she is asymptomatic (also very odd, given the fact that the condition usually presents with some clinical signs - like seizures, lethargy, overall malaise) and as long as she's happy, I will continue to treat her. I would be GLAD to answer any questions you have. I love what I do and I especially enjoy educating people about their pets. Feel free to PM me if you'd like to discuss further. 

I wish you the best of luck and hope for the best. 

Amanda
Hello Amanda,

our little boy Rupert has been diagnosed with 'Polycythemia Vera' on 26.6.14.  He had two fits on that day, one at home the other one at the vets.  I am in touch with Angela on this forum and she pointed out that you have quite a bit experience with this rare blood cancer.

Rupert is doing really well at the moment. They have taken 60 ml of his blood over 4 days, his blood count went from 70 to 60 then 65 again and now it is down to 57.  My question to you is: - is it possible that some cats take a while for their red blood cells to go down and  for it to show up and do you think it might be likely that it will still go down further without any blood letting.  He feels much stronger, jumps from the kitchen table now and it would be just ideal if he could do without constant blood lettings.  His last blood letting was on 30.6.14.

Angela pointed out that your cat needs just 2 per year.

I hope you cat is doing well.

It would be really nice if you would come back to me.

Have a good Sunday,

Adelheid
 

adelheid

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Hello Sanglulus,

I just wanted to know how your kittie is doing and if she still needs as many blood lettings as beforehand.

My little boy Rupert who is just 6 years 2 months old has been diagnosed with Polycythemia Vera 4 weeks ago.

His blood count is down to 58 (from 70) and his last blood letting was on 30.6.14.

Has anyone told you how long your kittie can live with this condition?

Have a good day,

Thanks,

Adelheid
 
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