Does anyone know what the price should be for a 2 year old spayed female purebred Maine Coon?

Niki5sims

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Hi, the person who purchased this cat as a kitten has to leave the country and has offered it to me for a price. I have no idea what is fair? Does anyone have experience with this? What is a fair price for an older Maine Coon?
 

GoldyCat

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The price depends on a number of factors. But before I start asking those questions, you need to have the current owner check his/her contract. Many breeders include a clause in the contract that if the buyer cannot or does not want to keep the cat it must be returned to the breeder, not sold or given to someone else.

So now the questions.
Is she registered with one of the cat associations (CFA, TICA, etc.)?
Was she originally sold as pet quality or show quality?
Does she have any medical issues that will require ongoing vet care/expenses?

Prices can vary widely, partly depending on the cat's background and partly on the part of the country/world where she is being sold.
 

Caspers Human

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I'm not an expert in Maine Coon cats but I have a little bit of life experience in a similar area that might help us get a start on things.
(My father was a dog breeder.)

First question: Is it a pet cat, a show cat or a breeding cat?

Pet cats are likely to be the least expensive, breeding cats might be the most expensive and show cats would probably be somewhere in between.

Pets, I would guess, should cost a couple-few hundred dollars and breeders might cost a couple thousand.

What else do you know? Does she have pedigree papers?
Since she's spayed, she's definitely not for breeding. Probably a pet.

Second question: What did the original owner pay?

That would give you a starting point to bargain from.

How does she behave? Most Maine Coons have good personalities but if she has behavior issues, you can ask for a lower price. If she's well behaved, that would be the sign of good upbringing and should merit more.

I don't know what else to ask... Does she have medical issues? Is she strongly bonded to a certain human? Is she a picky eater? Is she strictly an indoor cat or indoor/outdoor?

How well do you like her that might make her worth more to you?
 
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sivyaleah

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The price depends on a number of factors. But before I start asking those questions, you need to have the current owner check his/her contract. Many breeders include a clause in the contract that if the buyer cannot or does not want to keep the cat it must be returned to the breeder, not sold or given to someone else.

So now the questions.
Is she registered with one of the cat associations (CFA, TICA, etc.)?
Was she originally sold as pet quality or show quality?
Does she have any medical issues that will require ongoing vet care/expenses?

Prices can vary widely, partly depending on the cat's background and partly on the part of the country/world where she is being sold.
I second all of this.
Every good breeder will put a "right of first refusal" into their contract. It is up to the owner to contact the breeder first to see if they are interested in taking the cat back and rehoming it. If not, then they may go ahead and find a new home. Most reputable breeders are very concerned where their cats wind up and would want to ensure they are in good hands.

I went through this some years back when I considered adopting a purebred Ragdoll that wound up being offered by a local rescue. I went to meet the owner and cat, saw the cat's paperwork, contract from the breeder and read it completely. When I saw that clause, I became concerned as to why these people were rehoming this cat. Well, I soon found out when I sat on the couch and the cat lunged at me for literally NO reason at all. Clearly, something was wrong with her, but who knew what? Anyway, I declined the adoption, and immediately conferred with the recuse organization about what I'd read in the contract. I also, with help from others, was able to get in touch with the breeder who then got involved and took the cat back to her home to rehabilitate her. I later found out she eventually went to a new home, completely a changed cat.

My point of this, is one needs to be careful and ask all the right questions.

As for price, as others mention it depends on so many factors. Health, her behavior, is she really a purebred - absolutely ask to see her papers! If they are unable to produce her registration papers, consider her a domestic cat although she sure looks like a Maine Coon, we have one so I think I'm qualified to guess on that, and negotiate from there.

FYI the price for a well bred, socialized kitten from a reputable breeder, pet quality - can easily range from $1000 and up. We paid $1200 for our MC kitten so that gives you an idea. An adult should be far less.
 
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Niki5sims

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Hi, I appreciate all of your help! I met the cat and she is very nice. She was sold with an agreement to spay (she was spayed) from show quality parents but with a household pet clause. All of her medical documents were available (no issues) and the paperwork was there with the breeder information blacked out. She is from Indiana and the college student who bought her lives out of the country and does not have citizenship. She lived here to go to Medical School and is now returning to Afghanistan. The student doesn’t have the time to get her back to Indiana and has not discussed letting her go to me with the breeder. She is asking between $285-$325 for her. I don’t have the name and number of the breeder but sent photos of the cat and explained the situation to every Maine Coon breeder in Indiana that I could locate last night. No answers as of yet. The cat was listed on GoKitty. I am just worried that if I don’t take her in, who will? There is a huge problem here in Arizona with all the shelters being full and pets being dumped on the streets (It’s 110 degrees here). I definitely do not think the current owner would do this she is absolutely devastated about leaving her cat, but I am not sure I should give her $285?
 

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N Niki5sims The price seems very reasonable. If you went to a shelter or rescue you would wind up paying around $100 when all was said and done to adopt a cat, depending on what part of the country you are in. That's what we paid for our domestic cat through a rescue.

So to me, for a purebred cat, it does not sound outlandish at all. If you can afford it, and love the cat and feel comfortable with all the background info, it sounds like you have a new fur friend coming :redheartpump:

And we here certainly can help you through any challenges you may come up against acclimating her to your home, food, behavior, health etc. She's quite lovely in appearance, looks like she could use being groomed though.
 

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Well, just as an opinion, if she's a nice cat, I wanted her, and I was concerned about where else she might end up, I would offer a price, tell the owner her cat would get a wonderful home, and see what happens. I could then continue to follow up with breeders if they contacted me, but at least the cat would be safe.
 
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Niki5sims

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I'm not an expert in Maine Coon cats but I have a little bit of life experience in a similar area that might help us get a start on things.
(My father was a dog breeder.)

First question: Is it a pet cat, a show cat or a breeding cat?

Pet cats are likely to be the least expensive, breeding cats might be the most expensive and show cats would probably be somewhere in between.

Pets, I would guess, should cost a couple-few hundred dollars and breeders might cost a couple thousand.

What else do you know? Does she have pedigree papers?
Since she's spayed, she's definitely not for breeding. Probably a pet.

Second question: What did the original owner pay?

That would give you a starting point to bargain from.

How does she behave? Most Maine Coons have good personalities but if she has behavior issues, you can ask for a lower price. If she's well behaved, that would be the sign of good upbringing and should merit more.

I don't know what else to ask... Does she have medical issues? Is she strongly bonded to a certain human? Is she a picky eater? Is she strictly an indoor cat or indoor/outdoor?

How well do you like her that might make her worth more to you?
Strictly indoor cat, bonded to her owner, but because the owner is a college student she has had the opportunity to bond with many other people and pets. She is well socialized. She has full paperwork with breeder information blacked out.
 

sivyaleah

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Also, Maine Coons are quite different than any other cat I've had and I think most others who live with them would say the same. If you wind up with her, there are several Facebook groups which are for purebred MC's only that I've found very helpful. As much as I deplore Facebook, I've received great advice and info for our girl on in these groups.
 
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Niki5sims

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N Niki5sims The price seems very reasonable. If you went to a shelter or rescue you would wind up paying around $100 when all was said and done to adopt a cat, depending on what part of the country you are in. That's what we paid for our domestic cat through a rescue.

So to me, for a purebred cat, it does not sound outlandish at all. If you can afford it, and love the cat and feel comfortable with all the background info, it sounds like you have a new fur friend coming :redheartpump:

And we here certainly can help you through any challenges you may come up against acclimating her to your home, food, behavior, health etc. She's quite lovely in appearance, looks like she could use being groomed though.
Thank you, I have been reading up on how to acclimate an older cat to a new home and I’m sure I will have lots of questions.
 

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The price is reasonable even for a well-cared-for moggie; spays/vaccines/etc. are expensive. And if she comes with supplies that's especially reasonable.

I am a bit concerned about the breeder's info being blacked out. There's no reason for that. The current owner's personal info could be blacked out, but they should be willing to tell you who the breeder is. That makes it seem a bit shady.

Also be sure to follow all the usual buying safety protocols. Don't send a wire, don't exchange money until they hand you the cat, don't meet up alone, etc.
 
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Niki5sims

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Thank you, I have been reading up on how to acclimate an older cat to a new home and I’m sure I will have lots of questions.
Do Maine Coons go to a groomer ? I didn’t think of that? I have a groomer for my Cockapoo but I don’t think the cat would be emotionally ready to deal with that experience for a couple of months. I have a kit and the current owner has clipped her nails and brushed her but I don’t think she has been to a groomer. The photos I posted were taken this week.
 
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Niki5sims

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The price is reasonable even for a well-cared-for moggie; spays/vaccines/etc. are expensive. And if she comes with supplies that's especially reasonable.

I am a bit concerned about the breeder's info being blacked out. There's no reason for that. The current owner's personal info could be blacked out, but they should be willing to tell you who the breeder is. That makes it seem a bit shady.

Also be sure to follow all the usual buying safety protocols. Don't send a wire, don't exchange money until they hand you the cat, don't meet up alone, etc.
She does come with a months worth of quality food, toys, quality litter a carrier, brushes, nail clippers and her blanket. I just need to get a litter box and a cat tree.
 
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Niki5sims

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She does come with a months worth of quality food, toys, quality litter a carrier, brushes, nail clippers and her blanket. I just need to get a litter box and a cat tree.
The owner will bring her to my home with everything before payment and stay a little while so the cat can interact with me in my home before the owner leaves. I thought that would be important for the cat so that she would feel more like she was moved to be with me rather than my taking her away from her owner?
 

sivyaleah

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Do Maine Coons go to a groomer ? I didn’t think of that? I have a groomer for my Cockapoo but I don’t think the cat would be emotionally ready to deal with that experience for a couple of months. I have a kit and the current owner has clipped her nails and brushed her but I don’t think she has been to a groomer. The photos I posted were taken this week.
Nope you can do it yourself for sure as long as she tolerates it. Most cats do, but some don't. Our domestic girl literally drools when we comb her out. Our Maine Coon, ummm, HATES it but we have finally come to an understanding on it after many months and the story is way too long and off topic to get into here.

She just looked a little disheveled in that first photo which is why I mentioned it. If by some chance she happens to be matted underneath (very possible if she wasn't cared for properly) you may have to have her shaved down but you'll deal with that later on once you get her. Hopefully that isn't the case. But yes, there are cat groomers out there, though not as prevalent as dog groomers.
 

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I've only just seen this thread but as a price guide I paid £200 (about $250) for my Oliver but he was 10 yrs old and came with a magnificent pedigree. As a kitten or adolescent he would have been very expensive. He's 13 yrs now and it was the best £200 I've ever spent.
 

sivyaleah

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The owner will bring her to my home with everything before payment and stay a little while so the cat can interact with me in my home before the owner leaves. I thought that would be important for the cat so that she would feel more like she was moved to be with me rather than my taking her away from her owner?
Do not let her bring the cat to your house if possible. Meet in a neutral, public place for the hand off.
Safety first. You do not know the person.

EDITED: Once you get her home, best thing is to put her into a small room alone, with litter box, food, water (opposite side of room from litter box), a comfortable resting place and some toys/cat tree and leave her alone for a while. Try to block off anywhere in the room she can hide where you can't get to her. Let her decompress. She probably will be a little stressed from the car ride(s) and changes. Give her some time to adjust and don't panic if she isn't being real friendly at first. Even under the best of circumstances any cat, regardless if they came from a prior home or a shelter, will be a bit off at first.

Or not. Some come in and own the place immediately. Just depends on the cat.
 
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Niki5sims

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Strictly indoor cat, bonded to her owner, but because the owner is a college student she has had the opportunity to bond with many other people and pets. She is well socialized. She has full paperwork with breeder information blacked out.
Thank you!
 

Caspers Human

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The cat's owner is asking $285 to $325. Fairly reasonable.

How much do you want THIS cat? Given the asking price and what you know, how much do YOU think the cat is worth and how much are you willing and able to pay? What's the highest price you're willing to pay? Think about YOURSELF and not the other person, for the moment.

Is $300 a reasonable number for you?
For sake of discussion, let's say that your price is $300.

Lower your starting price to, maybe $250 or even $200. Let the other person respond and gauge their response. If they are firm at $325, let it go... No sale. If they are willing to talk, ask what they are willing to take. Let THEM talk you up to your maximum price. When you both reach an agreeable price, shake hands and say, "Sold." :)

However, if they are being a jerk about it, don't be afraid to walk away. If the seller knows that you are willing to take a walk, they are more likely to bargain.

Since it is a well behaved cat with papers and no medical issues, you should be prepared to pay a little bit extra. The seller did the work of bringing the cat up and taking good care of it. That's worth $$.

If you really, really like this cat and you feel like this is "your cat" then it's probably worth a few $$ more to bring her home.

As far as how or when to pay, that's part of the negotiation, too. The way my father did it was "Half up Front" and "Half on Delivery." When somebody paid their "honest money" he put a collar on the puppy's neck with the buyer's name. When the pups were ready to go to their new homes, the people brought the rest of their money and took the dog home, on the spot. Your situation is a little bit different so you can adjust for your own circumstance. However, paying "honest money" up front plus "cash on the barrel" when the deal is closed is a time-honored way to make an honest deal.

No, Dad didn't take the puppies to their new home. The buyer came and got them. We're not saying that the seller has any ulterior motives or anything. It's just not Kosher for them to come to your house. It's not the way things are done. I guess, if you wanted to have a reason for this custom, you can say it's because you want to make a "clean break" from the cat living in its old home.

Also, once the cat is in your home, bought and paid, she should be YOUR cat. It's nice to think that the seller cares for the cat and might want to see her but, like I said, you want a clean break. The seller shouldn't visit the cat or bug you to know what she is up to, all of the time. I'd say that the seller has the right to know that the cat has a good home but, beyond that, it's a clean break. Maybe you could e-mail a picture of the cat in her new home, just to let them know that everything is all right but, after that, YOU are her new human.

The only other thing that I can think of is to make sure that you agree upon an adjustment period with the seller. What if the cat just can't adjust to her new home? You'll want to have an "out." This is really not likely because Maine Coons are such well-mannered, adaptable cats but it is something you should keep in mind. Let's say a few weeks or a month... If the cat just isn't happy in her new home, can you call the person and negotiate a way to send her back? Again, not likely but you should talk about that before you plunk down your hard-earned cash.

Same thing for preexisting medical issues. If she gets sick because of some problem that she had before she came home with you, there should be an agreement on what to do.

Beyond those things, I think you are looking at a very nice cat. She seems to be healthy and, from what you say, well behaved.
If you really like her and want to bring her home, I don't think that $200 to $300 is too much to pay for a purebred Maine Coon cat as a pet.

From here, the decision is up to you.

Do you really feel like she is the cat for you? ;)
 
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