Do you think my cat really is a Ragdoll/Snowshoe mix?

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BellaMaxx2020

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Decent canned is better than good dry. Easier to make decent wet food.
The problem is, not all cats likes wet. None of my residents love canned, even if they have learned to eat at least a little.
Interesting! Thank you!
 

moxiewild

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Ah sorry, I don't know, his coat seemed a bit thin and oily, but if you just got him who knows what he could have been eating or his stress level. I think when I initially read this I mixed up threads that I was commenting on. I didn't mean to be nosy or worry you lol.
To be honest, the second I saw the photo my immediate reaction was “Whoa, he’s got some kidney cat-like fur going on there...”.

I foster/adopt mostly seniors, and this is what most of them look like. I was a bit surprised to learn he was only 2... that actually would alarm me more?

Definitely could be a grooming issue from stress that will improve on its own with time/adjustment, but B BellaMaxx2020 , I would keep an eye on it - the greasy/oily and spiked/clumped look isn’t normal.

I missed this exact thing for a long time with my first cat (who I adopted when he was 15) because I was totally new to cats. He was sick, and his coat condition was a glaring symptom.

However, he had several “old kitty diseases” so I assure you it is incredibly unlikely your kitty is suffering the same. I only mention it because I thought my cat’s fur was normal since I didn’t have much of a reference point prior to adopting him, and you don’t seem to be overly familiar with cats yourself if I’m understanding correctly.

But to be clear, his coat condition in that picture looks resoundingly not normal.

Maybe it’s just a bad picture/moment?

Otherwise, it could be simple, temporary stress from the move or just generally poor grooming habits. Or, it could be something more (including chronic stress issues). So keep an eye on it!

It also wouldn’t hurt to bring a new cat to the vet anyway for a general wellness check. A vet would be far more capable and qualified to assess it (and anything else)!

Congrats on the new buddy! ❤
 
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BellaMaxx2020

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Thank you! Yes, I made an appointment with our vet because I am worried about my new buddy. Thank you for the comments, they really help with insight! I am new to this site also but I'm really liking it so far because it seems people really care about cats & other's cat's wellbeing 😊🥰 I will update this & let everyone know how his vet appointment goes 😁

To be honest, the second I saw the photo my immediate reaction was “Whoa, he’s got some kidney cat-like fur going on there...”.

I foster/adopt mostly seniors, and this is what most of them look like. I was a bit surprised to learn he was only 2... that actually would alarm me more?

Definitely could be a grooming issue from stress that will improve on its own with time/adjustment, but B BellaMaxx2020 , I would keep an eye on it - the greasy/oily and spiked/clumped look isn’t normal.

I missed this exact thing for a long time with my first cat (who I adopted when he was 15) because I was totally new to cats. He was sick, and his coat condition was a glaring symptom.

However, he had several “old kitty diseases” so I assure you it is incredibly unlikely your kitty is suffering the same. I only mention it because I thought my cat’s fur was normal since I didn’t have much of a reference point prior to adopting him, and you don’t seem to be overly familiar with cats yourself if I’m understanding correctly.

But to be clear, his coat condition in that picture looks resoundingly not normal.

Maybe it’s just a bad picture/moment?

Otherwise, it could be simple, temporary stress from the move or just generally poor grooming habits. Or, it could be something more (including chronic stress issues). So keep an eye on it!

It also wouldn’t hurt to bring a new cat to the vet anyway for a general wellness check. A vet would be far more capable and qualified to assess it (and anything else)!

Congrats on the new buddy! ❤
 
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