Diet Questions for Kitten with Urinary Tract Issues

peanutbutterbonanza

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Hello!

Earlier this month I adopted a 3-4month old kitten from a shelter and was told he came in with bloody urine so he was being treated with antibiotics for the UTI. The bloody urine didn't end with the end of the course of antibiotics so when I took him back to my vet they did a bunch of tests and found out that he has a very large bladder stone which requires surgery to remove. It's being removed tomorrow and they've given me a prescription for Royal Canin urinary health cat foods.

Have people had good experiences with this food? I've found some mixed reviews when I've researched this food on my own and a lot of people seem to think that a wet food diet that's high in protein is better overall because Royal Canin is too high in carbohydrates.

I'm definitely no expert in cat nutrition and I'm not going to deviate from the prescribed food without consulting with my vet, but I'm having a hard time figuring out what I should ask my vet about or if these concerns are even reasonable at all. Since it's so uncommon for cats this young to have urinary issues (especially severe ones) I feel like I do need to take a more active role instead of wholly relying on good hydration.

I'd love to hear about experiences that other people have had with urinary health cat foods or what factors you think are important to consider

Thank you!
 

FeebysOwner

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Hi. Poor kitty! Do you know if the stone(s) is(are) oxalate or struvite? Royal Canin SO is one script food, another is Hill's C/D. Either way, it would be best to have your kitty on canned food as opposed to dry. The best thing for helping prevent stone production - in either case - is moisture, moisture, moisture. The other thing to consider is getting a specialist involved because this kitten is way too young for there not to be something else going on 'behind the scenes'.

Feeby was 5yo when she had to have surgery for oxalate stones in her bladder. These types of stones can't be dissolved and require surgical removal. Normally, struvite are clusters of stones and in many cases can be dissolved with foods like RC SO or Hill's C/D. After Feeby's surgery she was put on Hill's C/D (dry) and I later added RC SO - also dry. Not until 3 years ago did I add the canned versions of both, and Feeby has been stone free since her surgery - she is now almost 16+. But, knowing what I know today - despite her success with the dried foods - I would have started her out with the canned versions.

Feeby is an avid water drinker, which probably has helped her. So, if your kitten is not, you might want to try a water fountain to see if that helps to entice him to drink more.

Still - bottom line - see a specialist to find out what is behind such a young kitten getting a stone big enough to warrant surgery.
 

mrsgreenjeens

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I was wondering WHY surgery was required, and I think FeebysOwner FeebysOwner just answered the question. These stones must be oxalate.

For the immediately future I would feed the prescription foods, but I would request the canned version if I were you. AND, just for your reading pleasure, here is a thread with even more reading links to bone up on your oxalate crystal knowledge:

Calcium Oxalate Bladder Stones Prevention Question
 
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peanutbutterbonanza

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Hi. Poor kitty! Do you know if the stone(s) is(are) oxalate or struvite? Royal Canin SO is one script food, another is Hill's C/D. Either way, it would be best to have your kitty on canned food as opposed to dry. The best thing for helping prevent stone production - in either case - is moisture, moisture, moisture. The other thing to consider is getting a specialist involved because this kitten is way too young for there not to be something else going on 'behind the scenes'.

Feeby was 5yo when she had to have surgery for oxalate stones in her bladder. These types of stones can't be dissolved and require surgical removal. Normally, struvite are clusters of stones and in many cases can be dissolved with foods like RC SO or Hill's C/D. After Feeby's surgery she was put on Hill's C/D (dry) and I later added RC SO - also dry. Not until 3 years ago did I add the canned versions of both, and Feeby has been stone free since her surgery - she is now almost 16+. But, knowing what I know today - despite her success with the dried foods - I would have started her out with the canned versions.

Feeby is an avid water drinker, which probably has helped her. So, if your kitten is not, you might want to try a water fountain to see if that helps to entice him to drink more.

Still - bottom line - see a specialist to find out what is behind such a young kitten getting a stone big enough to warrant surgery.
The vet didn't tell me if they were oxalate or struvite, I think it was mostly the size that warranted the surgery but I'll definitely ask when I go to pick him up today. They gave me a prescription for the wet and dry versions of the Royal Canin food so I'll definitely go with the wet food.

I'm glad your cat has been stone free and the diet she's been on has worked well for her :)

I wouldn't say my kitten is a great drinker (at least compared to my other cat) and I did just acquire a fountain, which I'm hoping will help some. I've also been adding a little bit of water to his wet food when I give it to him, so I'll probably keep doing that as well.

Thank you so much!
 
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peanutbutterbonanza

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I was wondering WHY surgery was required, and I think FeebysOwner FeebysOwner just answered the question. These stones must be oxalate.

For the immediately future I would feed the prescription foods, but I would request the canned version if I were you. AND, just for your reading pleasure, here is a thread with even more reading links to bone up on your oxalate crystal knowledge:

Calcium Oxalate Bladder Stones Prevention Question
They gave me a prescription for the canned and dry versions of the food and told me that either/both would be fine so I am planning to go with the wet canned food.

Thanks for the link to that thread, I'll have to keep reading through it but the info looks really helpful!
 
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